1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. The forum migration is complete. We had some issues with the hosting provider and I had to restore the server a 2nd time so if you happened to post from about 9:30pm - 11pm PST your post may have been removed. Please double check to see if its still there. If you have any issues post them in the technical support forum or email the AAW Forum Staff at forum_moderator@aawforum.org. Thanks!
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Welcome new registering member. Your username must be your real First and Last name (for example: John Doe). "Screen names" and "handles" are not allowed and your registration will be deleted if you don't use your real name. Also, do not use all caps nor all lower case.

Favorite chuck?

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Claudio Feler, Oct 27, 2020.

  1. Timothy Allen

    Timothy Allen

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2019
    Messages:
    114
    Location (City & State):
    NH and ME
    I tried the standard jackscrew method (no go). I tried WD-40 (but not yet PB Blaster....) in where it could seep in between the adapter and the chuck, and tried the jackscrews again (no go). I tried getting some sort of wedge or pry bar in between the shoulder of the chuck adapter and the chuck body, but couldn't find a way to get enough "bite" or good enough leverage (no go). I took a solid 1" x 8 threaded piece I had (a spindle adapter) and threaded that into the chuck adaptor, then opened up a machine vise wide enough to clear the adapter but closed enough to support the chuck body on top of the vise jaws, stuck a 1/2" diameter rod through chuck onto my solid bit threaded into the chuck adapter, and wailed on it with a hammer (no go). Now you got me thinking about how I might be able to use the 35-ton hydraulic press I have in my lab at a school....

    I can still use the chuck on my new lathe with the 1-1/4 x 8 to 1 x 8 spindle adapter, but of course it would be better to use the proper chuck adapter...

    I never really liked the tommy bars anyway ;-)
     
  2. odie

    odie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    5,413
    Location (City & State):
    Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
    I had three chucks in the past that had those tommy bars.....and that was the main reason I no longer have them!.....so, I wouldn't blame you one bit if you just got a new chuck.

    However, I see you tried to wedge something in-between the adaptor and chuck body. If you managed to tip the adaptor even a thousandth, it could have exacerbated the difficulty in removing it. You may want to try using a brass mallet, or something that won't damage the adaptor, and try hammering it back into the socket......just in case you did tilt it a bit. (Of course, if you don't mind ruining the adaptor, then go ahead and use a steel faced hammer! :eek:) Then go back to using the factory method of removing it again. If you did manage to tilt the adaptor, then straightening it back out may be just the thing to break it loose, once it's straightened up again.

    ......or, not! :D

    -----odie-----
     
    Bill Boehme likes this.
  3. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    11,364
    Location (City & State):
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    The problem is "stiction". Unless you see corrosion, the tapered insert can usually be removed by first preloading the screws and then striking the side of the insert with a steel hammer to apply strong enough shocks to break loose the static friction. Keep in mind that both parts are "strained" so it will be an iterative process of torquing the screws and then applying some sharp shocks with the hammer. At first, you may not feel much if any movement of the screws, but be persistent ... eventually, the screws will begin to turn in small increments. While these grade 8 screws can take a considerable amount of torque, it is possible to snap the head off ... and it's a really bad sinking feeling when that happens. So now I have calibrated my muscle memory to know how much is too much. Fortunately, there had been enough movement that I was able to continue removing the insert while making certain that I didn't snap off the other screw.

    Once the insert has been removed you will see that the screws have mushroomed slightly on the ends so it will be necessary to grind that portion off before attempting to remove the screws from the insert. Do not reuse the screws because they have been overstressed and will likely break. Kevin at Oneway told me that the only screws they use are Unbrako grade 8 cap screws. He said that they have evaluated other brands of grade 8 cap screws and they have higher failure rates than the Unbrako screws. If you can't find them locally, you can get them from Oneway.

    Before you begin it would be a good idea to talk to Kevin to get more detailed guidance.
     
    odie likes this.
  4. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    11,364
    Location (City & State):
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    Odie is right. Sticking a wedge between the insert and body was the wrong thing to do because that is almost guaranteed to make things worse. The adapter must come out straight. The metal in the tapered socket has been elastically stretched while the insert taper has been elastically compressed. I think that the most practical way to remove the insert is to use the jackscrews while apply hammer shocks to break loose the stiction.
     
    odie likes this.
  5. Roger Holzmacher

    Roger Holzmacher

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2020
    Messages:
    9
    Location (City & State):
    Babylon, NY
    Oneway should include new screws with the adapters.
     
  6. Glenn Lefley

    Glenn Lefley

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2017
    Messages:
    537
    Location (City & State):
    Invermere, British Columbia
    Put end in ice water then try hitting it out. Or is it rusted!
     
  7. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    11,364
    Location (City & State):
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    That might be true if you're buying a new adapter.
     
  8. Tom De Winter

    Tom De Winter

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2020
    Messages:
    79
    Location (City & State):
    Quad Cities, IL
    FYI The new Nova Pro-Tec SuperNova 2 chucks are now available at Woodworker Specialties.
    https://woodworkerspecialties.biz/
    I've received superb service from this company.
     
  9. Bob Sheppard

    Bob Sheppard

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2017
    Messages:
    152
    Location (City & State):
    Wanaque, NJ
    Timothy- have you tried soaking the chuck/adapter with PB Blaster? I've had a lot of luck with it on getting stuck/ rusted pieces apart. You may need to spray it several days in a row, to get it to penetrate and work.
    I buy it at a HD or Lowes.
     
  10. Glenn Lefley

    Glenn Lefley

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2017
    Messages:
    537
    Location (City & State):
    Invermere, British Columbia
    I second the pb blaster, I had stuck bolts on A truck tried everything, then pb blaster and went in for lunch came back out and off it came!
     
  11. Lars Hansen

    Lars Hansen

    Joined:
    May 8, 2019
    Messages:
    152
    Location (City & State):
    Funen, Denmark
    Tim Tucker, Dennis Weiner and odie like this.
  12. odie

    odie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    5,413
    Location (City & State):
    Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
    Surprising results. PB Blaster next to last place.

    Liquid Wrench first place among the commercial products.....least expensive, too. I have Liquid Wrench, but it's been on my shelf for at least 25 years. The ingredients may have changed in that time. Obviously, I don't have much need for a penetrating oil......only very occasionally.

    -----odie-----

    correction: PB Blaster is the same price as Liquid Wrench.

    .
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2020
  13. Roger Wiegand

    Roger Wiegand

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2018
    Messages:
    314
    Location (City & State):
    Wayland, MA
    Home Page:
    Being severely right/left dyslexic (if there is such a thing) the only way I know how any chuck tightens is through experimentation (every single time). I certainly couldn't tell you whether a chuck is tightening to the left or right if I were watching or turning it myself without considerable thought, and perhaps drawing a diagram, followed by a discussion of "looking from which side?". Fortunately it's a quick, easy experiment. It's sure as heck not intuitive.
     
    Sandy Jarrell and odie like this.
  14. Bob Sheppard

    Bob Sheppard

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2017
    Messages:
    152
    Location (City & State):
    Wanaque, NJ
    Interesting review. But I've been able to loosen rusted parts with PB Blaster, that WD 40 wouldn't touch. I don't know why my results are different, but PB Blaster has worked well for me.
     
  15. Bruce Miller

    Bruce Miller

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2019
    Messages:
    26
    Location (City & State):
    Glen Spey, New York
    I've had the same results as Bob has with PB vs WD-40. I do some restoration of old machinery and soaking frozen parts in PB is always my first step.
     
  16. odie

    odie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    5,413
    Location (City & State):
    Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
    Maybe I'm afflicted similarly, Roger! :eek:

    Which way to turn the chuck key is not intuitive, and I've resolved the matter by engraving a little arrow near the chuck key receptacles that indicates expand mode on all of my chucks.....like this:

    <-----exp


    (Having one of your precious just finished bowls drop out and dent on your lathe bedways tends to make you come up with stupid solutions like this! :rolleyes:)

    -----odie-----
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2020
  17. William Rogers

    William Rogers

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2016
    Messages:
    589
    Location (City & State):
    Haubstadt, Indiana
    When I owned Nova chucks I contracted that disease. I only made matters worse when I bought a couple of Record chucks. I no longer own any Nova or Record chucks and now I am fully cured.
     
    Ed Davidson likes this.
  18. Timothy Allen

    Timothy Allen

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2019
    Messages:
    114
    Location (City & State):
    NH and ME
    Which way to turn your chuck key???? How about which way to manipulate the tommy bars!!!! Now that is real problem! :)
     
    Kent Jaffrey and Mark Jundanian like this.
  19. Bob Sheppard

    Bob Sheppard

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2017
    Messages:
    152
    Location (City & State):
    Wanaque, NJ
    That's what I use PB for, too, Bruce. I'm currently restoring an old DeWalt radial arm saw
     
  20. Bruce Miller

    Bruce Miller

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2019
    Messages:
    26
    Location (City & State):
    Glen Spey, New York
    Hey Bob I’ve done two Dewalt RAS. Restoration

    One a 1946 GP with. 2 Ho motor
    And the other (my crown jewel) a 1957 GA with a 3hp motor. (14” blade).

    pB blaster certainly was very helpful in freeing up those dog point set screws that are placed throughout. I love to use those machines.
     
  21. Timothy Allen

    Timothy Allen

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2019
    Messages:
    114
    Location (City & State):
    NH and ME
    Just want to report success in extracting the old chuck adapter from my Oneway chuck, and made a discovery in the process.

    I removed the jaws, including the base jaws (sliders) so that I could lay the face of the chuck body flat on my bench. Per Odie's advice, I rapped the chuck adapater with a wooden mallet to make sure it was seated. Then I inserted two jack screws and tightened them as far as the little hex key would allow. Then I screwed a spindle adapter into the chuck adapter, suspended the chuck body between the jaws of my machine vise, inserted a 3/4" bolt down through the chuck onto the end of the spindle adapter screwed into the chuck adapter, and then gave that a sharp rap with a steel hammer. Out popped the recalcitrant chuck adapter -- yay!

    But, I noticed a couple of blemishes on the sides of the tapered chuck adapter:
    Adapter-A.JPG Adapter-BJPG.JPG

    It turns out that there were some dimples on the back side of the chuck, that had bulged some metal into the taper socket, which in turn gouged the chuck adapter once it seated.
    Chuck.JPG

    Note I had taken a file to all the burrs before thinking to take these pictures. But those dimples on the back of the chuck must have been there when I first assembled the adapter into it 15 or 20 years ago, and the interference with the adapter was likely what made removal so difficult.

    I also want to apologize to Claudio for having opened the door from his thread on favorite chucks to the back alley of penetrating oils (as interesting as it was ;-)
     
  22. Timothy Allen

    Timothy Allen

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2019
    Messages:
    114
    Location (City & State):
    NH and ME
    BTW, FWIW, in addition to the above Oneway chuck, I now own two Talon chucks (which take the same jaws as the Oneway), a Vicmarc 120 chuck, and a Beall ER32 Collet chuck.
     

Share This Page