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Yet another wood ID request.

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Russell Nugent, Sep 22, 2020.

  1. Russell Nugent

    Russell Nugent

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    Being from the land of poplar and spruce, I wasn't even aware an oak could grow here. Anyone have a hint about what kind of oak im looking at? Being new to turning oak I had no idea how quickly it an cause surface rust. Seems to dull tools quick as well.
     

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  2. odie

    odie

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    @Russell Nugent My guess would be Swamp White Oak. First thought was White Oak, but that wasn't native your area. Swamp White Oak seems likely to grow in Alberta.
    https://www.wood-database.com/swamp-white-oak/

    ==================================================

    Funny, I was just logging on to ask a similar question. This photo was taken in Texas, and was sent by a friend. Anyone have any guesses as to what we're looking at here? Unfortunately, I don't have a photo of the rest of the tree.....:(

    -----odie-----
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Russell Nugent

    Russell Nugent

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    Looks like the tree melted
     
  4. Lou Jacobs

    Lou Jacobs

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    Is this an urban tree? Is it possible the tree was planted inside a concrete or steel circle, and after filling the diameter of the hole it had to spill over to keep growing?
    Just a weird burl developing at ground level?
     
  5. Randy Anderson

    Randy Anderson

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    I have an app on my iPhone called PictureThis that identifies plants and trees. It might work. It is incredibly accurate and sometimes amazes me at how it can identify things with minimal info. Simply snap a photo of leaves or bark and it searches a huge database and comes back with the identity and a lot of info about it. I've never had it fail on leaves. On bark it's not as predictable but does work. The app is not cheap but you can continue to use it for free if you ignore the ads and requests to subscribe.
     
    odie likes this.
  6. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    No idea but we could probably easily relieve him of that problem tree
     
    odie likes this.
  7. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Randy, thanks for the info for PIctureThis! I could definitely use it. Will see if I can get the app on my Android.
     
  8. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    I was thinking the bowl looked like black locust. They do survive well in harsh winters. What did it smell like? The locust kind of smells bitter. Oak has more of a vinegar type smell, very distinct.

    robo hippy
     
  9. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I’m with @robo hippy Looks like locust..

    A locust bowl my wife turned 618CBB56-646C-4597-93F2-90820E5E4A13.jpeg
     
  10. Hugh

    Hugh

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    Unknown what Oak......but, I think it is an Oak. Look at the rays at about 11 o'clock on the inside of the bowl.
    I believe there are something like 800 Oaks.
    Find a good local tree book and if you can come up with some leaves.....big help.

    Odie.........guess only.......a Maple tree?
    Or maybe just a "Burl Tree"?
     
  11. Russell Nugent

    Russell Nugent

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    Leaves are long gone. Have attached a picture of the bark if that helps. Not a native tree. Was planted in the 1920's, that's all I know.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Charles Cadenhead

    Charles Cadenhead

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    Texas doesn't have a lot of native maples (maybe 1 or 2 varieties). The bark looks a like live oak, especially around the burls.
     
  13. Don Wattenhofer

    Don Wattenhofer

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    Looks like one large root burl and a big job to get it out of the ground.
     
    Charles Cadenhead likes this.
  14. Don Wattenhofer

    Don Wattenhofer

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    If the bark has gray smooth areas, which is hard to tell on a natural edge piece like that, I would say red oak and that surface rust is caused by the high tannin content. The tannin will also cause the your fingers to turn black. The leaves on a red oak have pointed lobes, the leaves on white oak have rounded lobes and the other sub species I don't know. There are plant identification sites on the internet so if you could get a photo of the leaves and a larger section of bark you could probably get it identified. I am located in west central MN due east of Fargo ND where the oaks are mostly red & white just last week I cut down a 14" diameter red and have started to turn bowls similar to yours. Look at the thread titled live edge end grain bowls for the latest reply from me, which features a red oak bowl.
     
  15. Glenn Lefley

    Glenn Lefley

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    The bark looks exactly like eastern cottonwood.
     
  16. John Dillon

    John Dillon

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  17. John Walls

    John Walls

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    Odie, American Hophornbeam, Ironwood, Hardhack also Leverwood according to Picturethis app. Of course, this is an app species identification program, I'm personally clueless. Looks like a dress Mortica from the Adams family wears... LOL
     
  18. John Dillon

    John Dillon

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    I've turned some Chinese Elm that looks almost exactly like Russells bowl. Creamy deep brown color w/ similar sapwood color. Some tannic acid in Elm too.
     
  19. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    RE: the oak, Bur Oak is the only horticultural oak sold in our area of Montana. I believe there may be a couple of other oaks hardy enough to survive, but not sold by nurseries. Since it was probably not a native plant in Alberta, Bur Oak may be the answer. The leaves and acorns would help narrow things down.

    RE: the pictured tree, I can't say what kind it is, but looking at the ground around the tree, it looks like water has flowed over the area. The swelling might then be the root crown. Doesn't mesquite have a below ground burl? Could that be what Odie's picture shows?
     
  20. Glenn Lefley

    Glenn Lefley

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    How does your picture this app work on the picture of the bark of the other tree chunk above? I think it’s eastern cottonwood which is common in our neck of the woods. Alberta/ B.C.
     
  21. John Walls

    John Walls

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    If your asking about the bark Russell posted, it says it's White Mulberry. According to the app, again I'm clueless.... LOL


    I'm going to have to walk around and play with this new to me app. Could be fun!
     
  22. Russell Nugent

    Russell Nugent

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    I don't think it's cottonwood. Harder and heavier than the ash and elm I turn. Definitely a slight vinegar smell. Im thinking it's burr oak. Could be black locust but I don't know if locust has medullary rays like oak. Whatever it is it's a treat for me to turn nice wood like this. Thanks.
     
  23. Leo Van Der Loo

    Leo Van Der Loo

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    Burr Oak does grow here in N.W. Ontario as I discovered, it is a White Oak species, if there are any acorns (or caps of them you could tell easier.
    The Burr Oak has an acorn that looks like a burr, twigs asnd branches aare looking rough with ridges on them making them look almose square.
    If planted it could be another Oak, I don't know how they stand up to cold temperatures.
     
  24. odie

    odie

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    I have no further information on the big burl, but the person who took that photo thinks it was "live oak", and was in a Texas state park.

    https://www.wood-database.com/live-oak/

    I don't think we can consider that any more of an expert opinion, than the woodturners on this forum.....:D

    -----odie-----
     
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  25. Don Wattenhofer

    Don Wattenhofer

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    The bark in that photo resembles the red oak bark on my property in the north woods of MN where I have a mix of red oak and white oak that I can readily see the difference and verify by looking up at the leaves.
     
  26. Adam Cottrill

    Adam Cottrill

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    It does look like it could be black locust. If you have access to a UV light, it could be used to differentiate oaks from locust. Locust will glow a bright green under uv light, while oak does not (See https://www.wood-database.com/wood-articles/fluorescence-a-secret-weapon-in-wood-identification/). For kicks I took a couple of quick pictures of some scraps I had in my shop (and thanks to my daughters science fair project from a couple of year ago, I have a uv flash light). There are pieces of red oak, white oak, black locust, and honey locust under both natural and artificial light. Interestingly, the inky black background in the UV picture is the same piece of Baltic birch plywood used in the natural light picture, and the lighter sapwood of the locust is noticeably darker under UV light.

    Adam
     

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  27. Dave Landers

    Dave Landers

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    @odie - My initial impression was Texas Live Oak (I grew up in Ft Worth, and spent alot of time on my grandparents place with lots of Live Oak, Mesquite, and something we called Cedar, more likely a Juniper). Also you have a couple other clues: First one is "TX State park", which probably helps narrow it to something native. Second is there are what look like Live Oak leaves on the ground around the tree (brown shed leaves).
    icm_fullxfull.280812900_3gvkd60uemg4g0g0ggg8.jpg
    They could have come from anywhere, but it's a clue. The mature Live Oak leaves are smooth, not lobed like other oaks. There are also some what look like they could be Live Oak suckers growing up around the tree.
    Live Oak is oak, but with evergreen foliage - it's green year-round.

    @Russell Nugent - I got no input on yours. No idea what grows in your part of the continent.
     
  28. Don Wattenhofer

    Don Wattenhofer

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    oakreddown1c.jpg oakredstanding1c.jpg The first pic is red oak and the second is white oak.
     
  29. Timothy White

    Timothy White

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    Odie: your tree could be Balled Cypress.
     
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  30. Don Wattenhofer

    Don Wattenhofer

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    That has got to be Texas humor I hope
     
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  31. Timothy White

    Timothy White

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    It wasn’t meant to be funny. There really is a tree named Balled Cypress. The seed pods are balls similar to Sweet Gum. I have seen Balled Cypress with root structure similar to that.
     
  32. Tim Connell

    Tim Connell

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    @odie Not sure of the tree, but looking at the oak seedlings growing around it, my guess is bur oak.

    @Timothy White It is actually Bald Cypress, not balled.
     
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  33. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Most books call it bald cypress Sounds the same as “Balled”
    One of the few conifers to lose their needles in the winter Hence becoming bald.

    grows from Maryland to Texas likes wet roots.
    Trees have wide buttresses.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2020
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  34. Perry Hilbert

    Perry Hilbert

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    Wow. There are what? 30 different red oaks and 20 different white oaks. I can look out my back door and see 7 different varieties of oak just in the back yard and adjoining cow pasture. Then add the little water oak seeding I have not yet transplanted. I agree that the wood in the OP looks a bit like locust. Certainly as hard on tools as oak. If it glows under a black light it is probably locust. locust back is usually more deeply furrowed than oaks. Most oaks have a slightly disagreeable smell similar to "dog pile" when turned
     
  35. Tim Connell

    Tim Connell

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  36. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    White oaks do not have that significant smell. The smell of red oak reminds me of a winter fire on a crisp morning, but I don't turn it. Too much open grain.
     
  37. Leo Van Der Loo

    Leo Van Der Loo

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    The question I asked from the province of Alberta is wich Oak grows in Alberta, and the answer is,

    result for Alberta Native Oak trees

    The only oak indigenous to the Canadian Prairies, the bur is tough and majestic. Oaks are highly prized around the world for their ornamental value and tough wood and are often referred to as the King of Trees.
     
  38. Russell Nugent

    Russell Nugent

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    Thanks!
     
  39. Perry Hilbert

    Perry Hilbert

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    I get 3x3 red oak cut offs for free from a skid making operation. Yes it is too open grain for some uses and is difficult to get a nice smooth finish. I made an end grain lidded box in the shape of a large egg for a granddaughter. It was about 6 inches tall. Worked at sanding and sealing for probably two hours to get a nice natural finish without the open grain pores. Two hours after she had it, she painted it black.
     
  40. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    :) When you do collaborations you need to coordinate just a little. :)

    The classic test of form is how it looks painted black.
     

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