1. Welcome new registering member. Your username must be your real First and Last name (for example: John Doe). "Screen names" and "handles" are not allowed and your registration will be deleted if you don't use your real name. Also, do not use all caps nor all lower case.

Well after watching countless videos.......

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by Bobby Smith, Dec 11, 2018.

  1. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2004
    Messages:
    6,689
    Location (City & State):
    Lakeland, Florida
    Home Page:
    Bobby below is from the picture you posted of your gouge.
    The beauty of the side ground gouge is that the bevel angle changes as you move from nose to wing
    Your nose bevel angel is 60. The bevel angles at “A” and “B” will be smaller

    They will be similar to the bevel angles on the Ellsworth grind.
    At Position “A” where I do much of my push cutting has an angle of 45-40 degrees. A smoother cut than using the nose.
    At position “B” where I do most of the pull cutting has a bevel angle 30-25.

    Often the push cut begins on the nose and once the bevel riding cut is working the tool is rolled to cut in the sweet spot “A”.


    2447760A-8F6F-4798-A728-F33FA24A17BD.jpeg
     
  2. Bobby Smith

    Bobby Smith

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2018
    Messages:
    241
    Location (City & State):
    Midland, TX
    I learn more and more form y'all! Thanks Al!
     
  3. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2015
    Messages:
    2,335
    Location (City & State):
    Maui, Hawaii
    Home Page:
    You could build a spring pole sharpening system to go along with the spring pole lathe...
     
  4. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2015
    Messages:
    2,335
    Location (City & State):
    Maui, Hawaii
    Home Page:
    Bobby, personally, looking back, I believe that sharpening and understanding bevels, angles, for all the different tools, different uses, etc., was just as difficult as learning to turn. Furthermore, you can't really turn well until you know how to sharpen right. The two are intrinsically tied together. If you have not done so yet, I highly recommend you watch Stuart Peter Batty video: 7 principles of woodturning. So, don't get discouraged, keep learning and practicing. My hero turner, Bill Jones, was asked how he got so good woodturning, he answered: "why, you just stand in front of the lathe"! Is that simple, keep putting in the hours. Aloha
     
    Dean Center and Bobby Smith like this.
  5. john lucas

    john lucas AAW Forum Expert

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2004
    Messages:
    7,495
    Location (City & State):
    Cookeville TN USA
    Sharpening takes the same skill as turning. You simply have to stand at the grinder. My recommendation is don't try all the different grinds. Pick one, learn to sharpen and use that tool. When you get really good at that only then is it time to learn more and start experimenting. That's part of why there are so many different grinds out there. Someone just sort of figured out what worked for them and ground it that way. That's how I ended up with a very long wing grind. I did not know until later that others were using that grind.
     
    Dean Center and Bobby Smith like this.
  6. robo hippy

    robo hippy

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,058
    Location (City & State):
    Eugene, OR
    I did try pretty much all of the different grinds, and eventually settled on several that are favorites. Now, if I could just settle on the angles I want on my NRSs..... I don't think I use the skew chisel type at all any more, mostly 70/30 or 60/30, some times burnished burr, some times grinder burr, some times up side down grinder burr....

    robo hippy
     
  7. Bobby Smith

    Bobby Smith

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2018
    Messages:
    241
    Location (City & State):
    Midland, TX
    I appreciate the comments and help y'all. I will check out those Stuart videos there Emiliano. I don't get discouraged about much at all. I don't turn that much except for some pens. I want to start another small bowl in a few days. I know there are those that have already learned techniques over the years, and I know it will take me quite sometime to get my own techniques down, but until then, I also search for ways to help make my journey shorter. Right now, I will stick to standard grinds for my tools until I feel the need to change it up. I don't do extreme turning, and don't anticipate that for months/years down the road. My plan is to learn more how to use my tools to make my projects easier to do and still look good! I know everything has a learning curve and I am following the curve slowly but I don't think it hurts to have little short cuts along the way. I like my sorby system and it gives me a great view of how much more learning I need to accomplish sharpening my tools. I still have my grinder setup, but might as well use the tools that work for me also. Hopefully I can get back to some good turning soon. Thanks y'all!!
     
    Emiliano Achaval likes this.
  8. Ron Grob

    Ron Grob

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2018
    Messages:
    29
    Location (City & State):
    Springfield, VA
    Well, I'm now the happy owner of the ProEdge as well! My birthday is coming up and there's a group of guys that I regularly talk with that pretty regularly send each other gifts. We're from all over the country with a common interest in pipes and cigars. Well one of the guys lives fairly close and we get together every so often - he's a turner also so we end up talking a lot about it. A couple weeks ago we met up in Timonium, MD for a woodworking show that was held there. While taking a break from the show and talking with some other guys, I mentioned that I was giving some serious consideration to the the proedge instead of getting CBN wheels for my grinder.

    Well, yesterday I had a 36 pound box delivered to the house that included a brand spanking new ProEdge! I've ordered the jigs I need for it - can't wait to get it bolted to my bench and working.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
    Bill Boehme and Bobby Smith like this.
  9. Bobby Smith

    Bobby Smith

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2018
    Messages:
    241
    Location (City & State):
    Midland, TX
    I like mine very much Rob! I'm sure you will too. I'm also learning to use the slide jigs better now for my shorter tools that don't really work with the setup gauge and jig. I'm usually only using a couple tools at a time so I keep it set for those specific tools to just go and touchup real fast when I need a quick sharpen. I'm thinking of investing in the knife jig also. Its a little steeply priced but I do have a few knives I like to keep sharp. Lets us know how you like it after you've got it setup and used.
     
    Ron Grob likes this.
  10. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    11,447
    Location (City & State):
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    I would like to be friends with your friends. :D
     
    Ron Grob and Bobby Smith like this.
  11. Ron Grob

    Ron Grob

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2018
    Messages:
    29
    Location (City & State):
    Springfield, VA
    It's a "what goes around comes around" type of thing really. We enjoy "bombing" someone for special things. Like days that end in "Y" :D
     
    Bill Boehme likes this.
  12. William Born

    William Born

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2019
    Messages:
    9
    Location (City & State):
    New Hope, Alabama
    I am a fairly new turner. Started with Carbides and an now still learning to use the HSS chisels. Mainly spindle work - Mini birdhouses, inside-out ornaments, etc.
    I bought the Sorby ProEdge system last July (2019). I like the repeatability best. I lost the center of the mocular in both eyes about 10 years ago thus I have problems seeing fine details. I initially tried the Wolverine system but had problems in setup and repeatability because each eye has a different focus point. For instance looking at the date "2019" I see only see either the 20 or the 19, but not both at the same time, I have to shift my eyes.
    In my case the Proedge is much simpler to to set up for repeatability. I just takes a few seconds to resharpen.
    As to the 60 and 120 ceramic belts from Sorby and SuperGrit. I have used both and I think the Sorby belts are superior in grain size /d distribution and I seem to get a better grind with them. I still use the SoperGit ones for any major reshaping.
    Please excuse any misspelled word in this post - I also have problems in reading / proofreading.
     
    Bobby Smith likes this.
  13. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    11,447
    Location (City & State):
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    Welcome to the forum, William. Don't worry about spelling errors. Nobody is grading spelling here. When I try to proofread what I have typed, my psychological scotoma causes me to read what I intended to type and not what I actually typed.
     
    Charles Cadenhead likes this.
  14. Roger Wiegand

    Roger Wiegand

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2018
    Messages:
    360
    Location (City & State):
    Wayland, MA
    Home Page:
    Whatever sort of grinder you use to profile our tools, it's hard to bead an edge honed with a fine-grit diamond hone. On a skew I think it is pretty much essential, but since I've started honing I spend 1/10th the amount of time setting up and grinding my bowl gouge, and get cleaner cuts to boot. It only takes about 10-15 seconds to refresh the edge with a diamond slipstone, without moving away from the lathe. I now only go back to the grinder once or twice a day rather than every 5-10 minutes.
     
    Mike Adams likes this.
  15. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2016
    Messages:
    1,923
    Location (City & State):
    Nebraska
    It seems like the natural learning curve for most turners over time starts with basic turning skills on the lathe, progressing to basic sharpening skills on the grinder, progressing to honing skills of the cutting edge, progressing to tool geometry and wood grain geometry that allows the advanced turner to use various angled cutting tools at the appropriate angle for the wood grain being turned to achieve a clean cut for the various wood types on the lathe. This natural progression requires copious amounts of time on a lathe, this learning curve can usually be shortened with time spent with skilled turners sharing their years of knowledge gained during their turning journey. We will see additional advancements in turning over future generations as these skill sets are aggregated by each successive generation of advanced turners. When you look at crystal stone pieces turned several thousand years ago you realize there are more discoveries to be made with turning techniques that were lost over time during the dark ages.
     
    Bobby Smith likes this.
  16. Rick Wetzel

    Rick Wetzel

    Joined:
    May 22, 2019
    Messages:
    3
    Location (City & State):
    Dexter, Oregon
    Great! Another Sorby Pro Edge discussion!
    I bought mine almost a year ago, but even though I like it very much, I was starting to feel like the odd man out. It just kind of seems over looked in the majority of sharpening discussions.
    That Super Grit source sounds like it's worth checking out! Thanks for mentioning it.
    Two other things: I too have been toying with the idea of the knife sharpening jig in the future.
    Also I wished there was more information out there regarding drill bit sharpening on the Sorby.
    I've tried it a few times, but not knowing exactly what I'm doing, it's kind of hit or miss for me.
    Over all, I find it's a most excellent tool.
     
    Bobby Smith likes this.
  17. Mike Adams

    Mike Adams

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2020
    Messages:
    189
    Location (City & State):
    Bloomfield, New Jersey

    I've seen several of those. They usually have some sort of foot powered sharpening wheel.
     
  18. John Torchick

    John Torchick

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Messages:
    2,817
    Location (City & State):
    Cleveland, Tennessee
    Mike Adams and Bobby Smith like this.
  19. John Torchick

    John Torchick

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Messages:
    2,817
    Location (City & State):
    Cleveland, Tennessee
    Told I posted the same video twice. Had two names for it. My mistake.
     
  20. Mike Adams

    Mike Adams

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2020
    Messages:
    189
    Location (City & State):
    Bloomfield, New Jersey
    I was going to do that mod on a Harbor Freight 4x36, 6" sander to make it a knock off Pro-Edge. I looked hard at the ProEdge but couldn't get it past the finance committee ;-)

    I bought a CBN wheel, instead.
     
  21. John Torchick

    John Torchick

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Messages:
    2,817
    Location (City & State):
    Cleveland, Tennessee
    Ye olde finance committee! I have one here. We each have a vote but her vote is bigger than mine.
     
    Mike Adams likes this.
  22. Mike Adams

    Mike Adams

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2020
    Messages:
    189
    Location (City & State):
    Bloomfield, New Jersey
    Wow.... That exactly how it is for me, too! They must have both gotten their accounting training from the same school :)
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice