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video available for basics?

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by Brian Meyette, Oct 29, 2009.

  1. Brian Meyette

    Brian Meyette

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2009
    Messages:
    4
    Location (City & State):
    Cornish, NH
    Home Page:
    I took wood lathe work in high school, but that was quite a long time ago. I have a lathe, and I'd like to try turning out some bowls. Other than playing with trial-and-error, I don't recall exactly what the tools are called and which one to use in what circumstances. I've viewed a couple videos on the internet, but they don't focus on the tools; which one to use for what and how to hold it; what part of it to present to the wood and how to move it.

    I think the half-round ones are called gouges, and that's mainly what I've been using. But I am not sure what part of the surface to put on the wood, what angle the tool should be to the wood, and whether to move the tool left to right or right to left. I assume the vertical angle should be about perpendicular, but on the horizontal angle, I don't know whether to "push" or "pull" the tool.

    I've looked on supplier sites like Penn State, but haven't found any videos that cover basics like this. Is there such a video out there? Or maybe a book? Something covering the basics of sharpening the tools would be good, too. Any recommendations?

    thanks,
    brian
     
  2. John Abt

    John Abt

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2006
    Messages:
    149
    Location (City & State):
    Hanover, MD
    Brian,

    Depending on what you want to turn, there are several excellent videos available from either Packard or Craft Supplies. Other Woodworking stores also sell them but the two I mentioned have the widest selection.

    There will be lots of opinions about which video is best, but for bowl turning, I recommend Bill Grumbine's videos and Mike Mahoney's as well. Richard Raffan is also excellent. For spindle work and skew chisels, you can't beat the Alan Lacer series (Raffan is also excellent here as well).

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. Mark Warden

    Mark Warden

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
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    334
    Location (City & State):
    Sinking Spring Pa.
  4. LHauch

    LHauch

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Messages:
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    Location (City & State):
    Lacey, WA
    Home Page:
    Hi Bryan,

    Check out Keith Rowley's 'Woodturning A Foundation Course' Book and Video available from Craft Supplies USA: http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com

    This will give you the woodturning basics. Bill Grumbine's two videos are excellent for learning how to turn bowls.

    I also recommend the Jimmy Clewes videos, while I have not seen his new 'Back to Basics' DVD, I'm sure that he's done a bang up job. (I have most of his other DVDs, and have taken a couple of courses from him.)

    Cheers,
    Larry
     
  5. Brian Meyette

    Brian Meyette

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2009
    Messages:
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    Location (City & State):
    Cornish, NH
    Home Page:
    ordered videos

    I ordered one each of the 3 names mentioned. Guess I'll have plenty of viewing!
    thanks for the assistance,
    brian
     
  6. Rick Taylor

    Rick Taylor

    Joined:
    May 29, 2004
    Messages:
    42
    Location (City & State):
    Kimmswick MO
    I agree all the dvds mentioned about are excellent, but I would highly recommend "Bowl Turning" by Del Stubbs. It is dated because it was made many years ago but gives great coverage of the basics. Del has a great method of teaching and is very effective. Although it is primarily about Bowl Turning, he goes into detail about all the diferent types of tools (including spindle), how to sharpen them as well as how to effectively present them to the wood to get the best surface. I am sure it is available on line at either Amazon.com or the Taunton Press web site. It may be available for free from your local library. You may also want to see where your nearest AAW chapter is and see if they have it in their library. This will also put you in contact with other club members that will be very happy to help you with your new addiction.

    Rick
     
  7. Griesbach

    Griesbach

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Messages:
    390
    Location (City & State):
    Oshkosh, WI
    All the suggestions here are excellent and I highly recommend Grumbine's videos.

    However, find the AAW chapter nearest you and contact them about joining. They may have a mentoring program and that could well be just what you need. Here's a link to locating an AAW Chapter.

    http://www.woodturner.org/community/chapters/LocalChapters.asp
     
  8. odie

    odie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    5,413
    Location (City & State):
    Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
    Brian.......

    Get the videos.....I've watched many of them in the past, and I don't honestly think I've watched a bad one.

    I'd like to interject a point in here, though.

    You might also consider getting a book on lathe turning. If the intent is to glean information, there is something about the written word that is entirely different than videos and films. I don't know if my experiences parallel others, but I'm in an entirely different frame of mind when I read.......and the writer gives that information in an entirely different way.....I don't know what the proper term for it is, but information is processed differently in my mind when I make the effort to read it......

    I have a couple or three very old wood lathe books, and I've read all of them from cover to cover years ago. Some of that information has stuck better than if I'm sitting on the Lazyboy and watching it.

    I suppose I must point out that there is something about seeing motion in the videos that cannot ever be duplicated with written material, and that is priceless.......

    My advice is to do both, and you will be better for it.

    ooc
     
  9. Jim Killen

    Jim Killen

    Joined:
    May 7, 2009
    Messages:
    12
    Odie, I think it depends on how an individual learns and processes information. Some people absorb and retain the written word better than a visual lessen, while others do better with a visual demonstration. I'm pretty much self taught, learning mostly from books I bought forty years ago, and practical experience. Now, in the age of computers and DVDs I realize I've been doing things wrong based I what I "thought" an author meant. I think the best approach is some reading, some watching, and lots of practice. I also think good tools are a must! It's hard enough to learn when everything works right, and almost impossible when your tools aren't functioning properly.
     
  10. odie

    odie

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    Location (City & State):
    Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
    Yes, I think that's very true, Jim......

    Just wanted to point out that books are another option. Reading has been good for my overall learning experience, and it might be a good addition to someone else's curriculum as well..........

    ooc
     
  11. Jake Truxal

    Jake Truxal

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2009
    Messages:
    90
    Location (City & State):
    Pittsburgh
    I got an excellent intro video from Robert Sorby called "Starting out Woodturning". Like you, my only real prior experience with wood lathes was in high school wood shop 30+ years ago. But even then there was no real teaching on tools or techniques, we just used the lathes uneducated.

    When I got back into turning last year I bought a Robert Sorby bowl gouge and sent them an email that it didn't cut very well. The tech I corresponded with said I just might not be using it correctly and he sent me the video for free. He said there are "lot's of "scrapers" out there who don't know how to properly use the tools and very few actual turners". Boy was I surprised when I watched the video to learn that I was actually one of those scrapers. I was using practically every tool incorrectly, just below level and straight in on edge. I would spend 5 times as much times sanding as I would turning. My biggest shock was the glass like finish you can get with a properly used skew !

    This video goes thru all the basic tools, their proper use and sharpening. Then they make a few project from start to finish, I think a vase, goblet and bowl. I highly recommend this video, I learned an incredible amount and rewatch the video many times. I'm more of a turner than a scraper now but still have a long way to go. My biggest problem now is I have to constantly change the shape of my project because of gouges caused by "catches". :( Then once you've got that mastered I've found that then there is the whole realm of tool sharpening to be mastered and the subject of finishes is a whole concept in itself which looks like it probably takes years to master. Fortunately this forum has lot's of experienced turners who give great advice.

    BTW, there is (or at least was) a free set of videos you can get from Robert Sorby on their "Speciality Tools".

    As a fellow beginner I strongly recommend learnign to use the tools properly and learn to sharpen. A sharp tool makes a major difference in the quality of the cut. There are plans for sharpening jigs available for free on the internet that you can make vs buying professional system. Also, you need to get an aluminum oxide (white) wheel for your grinder vs the gray wheel that comes standard and the lighter the pressure the better when sharpening.

    I also agree a good book is helpful too. I have one by Richard Raffan, who I gather from reading forums seems to be one of the top turners out there.

    Being a novice too, these are some of the basics I've picked up in the past year that seem to me to be some of the first things to learn, hope they help.
     

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