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Turning* Shop

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Michael Giery, Jan 6, 2021.

  1. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    My ceilings are just under 9 foot. If I am carrying a sheet of plywood, I have to set the narrow end down flat on the ground to stand it up right. Can't set it on a corner and then stand it upright. Should have gone for 10 foot... Should have run duct work for dust collection up in the ceiling rafters.

    robo hippy
     
  2. Hugh

    Hugh

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    Other thoughts I have had about building a shop........Have you thought about putting in electrical outlets in the ceiling? Like over the area where you are putting your lathe, bandsaw. Think both 220V and 110v.
    Also, put in twice as many outlets around the shop as you think you will need or want. Way easy when building from new. Also, outlets outside the shop. There will be days when you want to sit outside and use a carver or something electrical. Saves on breaking out the extension cords....an item that one can trip on.
    Cabinets for the shop. Ones on the wall....normal cabinet. Ones on the floor......make then sets of drawers. Make the drawers big enough to hold your various tool cases (routers and such). Get good drawer slides. My friend the cabinet maker did that in my shop. Wonderful. You do not have to get down on your knees to get at the back of some cabinet shelf. You just have to pull out the drawer to get the items in the back. My knees just love the drawers. I do have a cabinet with shelves......I find I never use it. It has stuff, but I never get down to get stuff out. Hurts my knees too much.
    Also, when you get cabinets built......think about the height you want. What height works best for you?
    Some good info in the past responses. Some, I should have had before I had my shop built.
     
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  3. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    I did put a couple of plugs in the ceiling, but if you ever change how you want your shop set up, that can mean dangling cords where you don't want them. A few staples in the ceiling won't look pretty, but it works. In my flat work room, I have several in the floor, but they were planned around work stations. I don't like cords on the floor. Some times I am more prone to stumbling than others.... I don't bounce like I used to...

    robo hippy
     
  4. Mark Jundanian

    Mark Jundanian

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    Even if an overhead outlet doesn't end up exactly where you want it it is easy to run the cord along the joists/rafters.

    I put in overhead outlets for light fixtures, but didn't think to do it for machinery. Still I use plastic coated threaded "j" hooks to run a few cords along the ceiling and out of the way.

    I use larger j hooks to run flex hose for the DC.

    All the light fixtures are separate plug wired units and plugged into overhead outlets. So it's easy to re-configure or add to the lighting. And swapping out for different lighting is a simple matter of un-plugging one and pluggung in another.
     
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  5. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    You can use Wiremold channel or solid strut channel ran the length of the ceiling to distribute power the length of your shop. They make device boxes that can be moved at anytime along the channel. There are also several companies that make light duty power bus duct in 30A, 60A and 100A versions that use bus plugs that connect into the power duct channel that runs the length of the work shop area. They use these systems in various manufacturing and craft production areas to efficiently and cleanly run power in a work area. In many production type work areas the products may change or the process may change and this allows easy movement of the power drops for equipment, lights and hand tool receptacles. In a typical shop environment this will save you time and money not having to hire and electrician every time you move or add a piece of equipment or rearrange your shop. There are also a couple of companies that manufacture a Trolley Duct system, this product allows the movement of the drop power cord along the length of the trolley while it is in use. In the sewing industry they refer to this product as FeedRail and Electro-Rail that is used to distribute power throughout a production work space. Most of your commercial and industrial electricians are familiar with these systems and the installation is fairly simple and quick.
     
  6. Timothy Hoyt

    Timothy Hoyt

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    Lots of good suggestions have been made.
    I currently have 9' ceilings in my shop and am very happy. 8' would be too low and I suspect 10' would be too much.
    Having a garage door makes the area a garage in the eyes of the code official. You're probably OK for fire separation but watch out for the sloped floor requirement. You might be able to get around it by installing a floor drain (put some baby oil in the trap).
     
  7. Glenn Lefley

    Glenn Lefley

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    The reason people put baby oil in a trap is two fold.oil floats and does not evaporate. So it- Stops smell of stagnant water and most important stops the evaporation of water out of the trap so it never dries out and you get a sewer smell!
     
  8. Hugh

    Hugh

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    A further thought about electrical outlets in the ceiling. To fix the problem about moving tools at a later date.....get the electrician to leave about 6-8 feet extra wire above the rafters. That would allow one to move an outlet around in a ceiling. Just a thought.
    When I had the electrician wire my shop, there was no extra wire. And I wanted to move the lathe to a different spot. But, I was able t swing the wire over to where I wanted it. Worked OK.
     
  9. R Henrickson

    R Henrickson

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    That is exactly what I had done, and it has worked out well. My shop space is in my basement (with exposed floor joists), with limited wall space. Dropping socket boxes on a 2x4 to just above head height makes them easily accessible and keeps cords etc from underfoot. Having the extra length meant that when I got a new and larger lathe, I was able to adjust the location of the power plug.
     
  10. Kevin Jenness

    Kevin Jenness

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    I was in a custom house under construction watching Sparky rough in the kitchen can lights, leaving about 20' of cable coiled above the joists. When he noticed eyes on him he just shrugged and said, "Designer loop".
     
  11. odie

    odie

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    I have several machines that aren't next to a wall, and having ceiling outlets keeps power cords off the floor. This is one of the best things I ever did, when I put the current shop together. :D

    -----odie-----
     
  12. Lawrence Duckworth

    Lawrence Duckworth

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    I put most all of my electrical outlets at 55".... high enough not to interfere with work bench and low enough not to mess with cabinets. one thing that may sound a bit nit picky is make the ground port on your 30 and 50 amp outlets face down so the plug hangs.
     
  13. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    I just dropped a extra length wire. The wire is stiff enough that it does not fall out of the ceiling and I have it long enough that it can be moved anywhere needed. This could be done with both 220 and 110.
     
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  14. Peter D'Attomo

    Peter D'Attomo

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    Mike, you've gotten an abundance of suggestions and I'll add one I did not read. Add mats to the shop so that you're not on concrete. Good luck, I can only hope and wish for that size shop. :)
     
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  15. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Back in the 80's I worked on a new automobile manufacturing facility that I helped the electrical contractor bid the project and we worked together to do some design build solutions for the facility after he got the job. One of the production areas we used a solid strut channel ran the lengths of the assembly line areas and supported the luminaires from the strut channel and also ran 120V circuits through the channel for the luminaires and 120V receptacles for tools used on the assembly lines. The channel is rated for supporting equipment and as a wireway for electrical power.
     
  16. Mark Jundanian

    Mark Jundanian

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    Another thought. If it's an option I favor positioning the lathe to face the entrance. That way I'm less likely to be startled by somone coming into the shop.
     
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  17. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    Mark, I had forgotten that point. I did set up my lathes so I can see the front door of my shop or see out the window so I can see some one coming in...

    robo hippy
     
  18. Don O. Jr.

    Don O. Jr.

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    Don't forget about an air compressor.
     
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  19. Michael Giery

    Michael Giery

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    Great point about not being startled. My plan was to 1) have a sign on the door "if you hear machines running do not enter" and/or 2) have a small latch on the inside of the door so no one can just walk in. Problem with #2 is if I have a bad accident I have essentially locked myself in and locked any would be help out.....

    Question on the air compressor. I see several shops that have the compressor set up outside of the shop whether under an awning or in a separate little closet. What is the reason for this?

    Thanks
    Michael
     
  20. Glenn Lefley

    Glenn Lefley

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    Noise! And they produce heat if running all the time. But mostly noise!
     
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  21. odie

    odie

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    This is true......the compressor will drive you nuts if it's continually running. I know that because my first compressor only had a 20 gallon tank, and it pretty much was continually starting and stopping!

    If you do decide to keep your compressor in the shop, get as large a tank as you can. When I decided to upgrade my compressor, I put it in the shop, as a matter of convenience at the time. Mine has an 80 gallon tank. (Another option might be two, or more tanks online.) I no longer use air tools for sanding, so my main purpose is blowing chips and dust away around lathe and shop. While turning, I'd guess my compressor turns on about once an hour for a couple minutes.......that's not too hard to take, in my opinion. :)

    -----odie-----
    IMG_2395 (2).JPG IMG_2396.JPG
     
  22. Lawrence Duckworth

    Lawrence Duckworth

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    speaking of noise, what about dust collection? mines homemade a hideously loud.
     
  23. Kevin Jenness

    Kevin Jenness

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    I am going to post a note on the door saying, "If you hear machines running come around to the side window where I can see you." Locking the door doesn't seem safe.



    1. Space. 2. Noise. 3. Heat. My compressor is upstairs, and the cyclone is outdoors.
     
  24. Mark Jundanian

    Mark Jundanian

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    I agree that locking the door is not wise. My wife is the only other person in our home. Long ago I explained my concerns about being startled and we worked out anarrangement that has been successful. When I'm working and she needs me she stands at a distance in the periphery of my vision and waits for me to notice her, which she says may take 30 sec.

    Also we still have a land line in the workshop. The ringers are off so we don't "receive" calls on it, but if used to call 911 the caller ID displays our address.

    I have a pancake compressor. I put it on a couple of rubber mats to reduce the transmissin of vibration. Knocked off a couple decibels, too. Very small gain, but virtually no cost.
     
  25. Dale Kern

    Dale Kern

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    Shops only come in one size: Too small!-)

    Great ideas here. I would definitely consider walling off the compressor and dust collector for noise control, and even consider ducting the exhaust of the dust collector outside in warm weather. I have been considering this type of modification to my shop for years.

    As for being startled, I had a farmer neighbor come into my shop once with all manner of tools running, and me with hearing protection and focus on not loosing any more fingers (!). He simply flipped the light switch at the door on and off a couple of times (quickly) and I was alerted. I've since added a sign at the door when someone needs my attention to turn the ceiling lights off and on a couple of times. It wakes you up, but without being distracted enough to hurt yourself.
     
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  26. Tom Beatty

    Tom Beatty

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    I have a small shop so bought a California air compressor that is rated at very low db and it is amazingly quiet.
     
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  27. Lou Jacobs

    Lou Jacobs

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    I think it’s been said before, but if you put the cyclone/dust collector outside, you can pretty quickly evacuate heated or air conditioned air out of the shop.
     
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  28. Kevin Jenness

    Kevin Jenness

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    My setup returns filtered air to the shop space. Here in VT its pretty much necessary in winter.
     
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  29. TJ Hamilton

    TJ Hamilton

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    Hi Michael: You are just down hill from me, so greetings and salutations. The shop planning and building is one of life’s great experiences; after our weddings, children and more weddings. You are getting all the usual outstanding advice. However, I noticed no one responded to “cement floors.”

    Free advice is worth what you pay for it: put down tuba4 stringers and cover with 3/4 ply. Tongue and Groove sub-floor works great. Put the good side up, slather it with BLO for color and then a couple of coats of poly. Turning tools dropped won’t get dinged; your feet and legs will thank you and it will look like a “wood shop’!

    Since you’re at sea level I would also recommend using the 6mm plastic drop cloths from the Big Box stores under the tuba4s.

    Separate circuits for the 220 machines; plenty of outlets for the 120 hand tools. Power strips are your friend; you won’t use more than one at a time.

    Glad you are deploying A/C there on SS. Does get a tad humid.

    Blessings, Tom, uphill in GA, with a wooden floor shop.
     
  30. Tom De Winter

    Tom De Winter

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    Guess I'm not fluent in Southern Speak. I had to Google "tuba4s" before realizing what you were talking about. ;)
     
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  31. Lou Jacobs

    Lou Jacobs

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    Glad you clarified that Tom, I thought he was talking about musical instruments! (Covered by plywood?)
     
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  32. Dale Kern

    Dale Kern

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    I agree with you Lou, I will clarify my comment that the ductwork/venting of an outside dust collector should allow either exterior exhaust or return of filtered air to the workspace. Some of the big shops I worked with do it this way and it would work in a small shop also. Returning filtered air to the workshop always makes sense in the dead of winter or the highest humidity conditions of July/August, but venting to the outside is refreshing at times.
     
  33. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    I remembered asking Oneida about the need to filter the air coming back into the shop from the DC. They commented, in an insulted tone, 'you do not need to refilter the air'. If you have the pleated paper filters, and no leaks, then you don't need to filter the air. If you have the old 0.5 micron cloth bags, it might be a good idea.

    robo hippy
     

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