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"Stay out of the line of fire"

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Dennis Weiner, Dec 31, 2020.

  1. Dennis Weiner

    Dennis Weiner

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    Body armor? Maybe the group can recommend something stylish that goes with my Dennis Stuart Arm Brace
    So that I can properly joust the wood. Lol

    The hook that we were using was the Andre Martel Hook tool see photo. If you take a traditional scraper and present it to the wood below center it will invariably catch. If you approach the wood with the tip of the AMHT it will grab wood similarly. The hook tools base is fairly thin and it will snap. See broken base. also when you teach a skill to an experienced woodturner they often get ahead of you. He didn’t even give me a chance to instruct him to rotate the tool and approach the wood with the heal of the tool. It happened in an instance. FB914F8C-EC39-4E0A-9150-9439D0C2D05E.jpeg 0B9C0152-7995-4204-8190-28D6CB1E2559.jpeg
     
  2. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Line of fire could be like the M26 grenade- dangerous within a diameter of 15 meters.
     
  3. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    The doctors?
     
  4. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    When I went to Arrowmont, I was a bit jumpy, to say the least. I kept hearing near catches all the time. Twice, my neighbor, his bowl flew off the lathe. I tried to help him he told me he was happy with his technique. Finally, he did ask me for help, I noticed you don't have any catches, you are doing something right, he told me, LOL We had a bowl land at someone's feet, on the other side of the shop, almost...
     
    hockenbery likes this.
  5. Russell Nugent

    Russell Nugent

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    We on this site are a tiny segment of the woodturning population. You wanna be scared by safety issues go to the turning reddit and see what they've got going on for advice.
    My favorite scary thing I've seen so far though is a review on amazon of a set of carving gouges I was looking at. The last review just said " not a good product, bent as soon as I tried to use them on the lathe".
     
  6. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    On Facebook, yesterday I watched a "master" He was sheer scraping the inside of a bowl with a bowl gouge, then he was using a scraper because I'm guessing the gouge didn't do it, scrape the inside of a finished bowl all the way up to the rim.
     
  7. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    They are dead by now...after 67 years. Company relocated to central PA. Don't know what happened to the guy's thumb. Possibly ended up in the cafeteria.
     
  8. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    I have seen people doing what they called a 'shear scrape' with a gouge on the inside of a bowl. Without exception, they held the gouge level. This to me is a scraping cut, not a shear scrape. To be a shear scrape or a 'slicing' scrape, the cutting edge has to be presented at an angle, not flat/90 degrees to the rotation. I do use a shear scrape all the way to the rim, and use a scraper with a ) shaped nose and, just like when using a skew, always cut with the lower half of the cutting edge.

    robo hippy
     
    Donovan Bailey and Dennis Weiner like this.
  9. Donovan Bailey

    Donovan Bailey

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    I'd like to endorse one of the shear cuts (both inside and outside of a vessel) that you discussed in one of your videos. This is where you put a fresh grind on a scraper and make a light slicing/shearing cut by turning the scraper on its side at something like a 45 degree angle to the work. When I'm pulling out all of my tricks to try and remedy some ugly surface stuff...I pull this one out every now and then and it sure does work for me on some occasions.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2021
  10. Tom Gall

    Tom Gall

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    Another woodturner's bit of terminology that causes confusion. "Shear (sheer?) scrape" is an oxymoron - can't be one and the same in my opinion. A "shear" (slicing) cut is cutting the wood (nice little curls) - a "scraping" cut usually produces mostly dust. Just my 2¢. :)
     
  11. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    The term 'shear scrape' is probably not accurate, but it is difficult to find another term that applies. Another confusing thing to me is the idea that a scraper doesn't cut, and that it 'scrapes'. If you are not familiar with my use of scrapers, shall we say that I use them a LOT. They are my primary roughing tool for bowl turning, and are far more versatile than many think. Perhaps more accurate would be to say that I use a 'scraping cut' rather than just a scrape. Think about what a card scraper does... In dry wood, I get a lot more dust, no matter what tool I use. With a good sharp scraper, I can pull off shavings that you can see through, and you can't do that unless you are 'cutting'. Same with dry wood cutting, I can pull off thick heavy shavings or dainty float in the air shavings. And yes, I have had people tell me that I don't use a gouge because I never learned how to cut properly with one. While I don't do production work any more, I can keep up with just about any one with a gouge. A scraper is a more efficient tool for heavy stock removal...

    robo hippy
     

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