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Sorby 8803H

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by Andrew Meyer, Feb 18, 2012.

  1. Andrew Meyer

    Andrew Meyer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
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    Location (City & State):
    North Carolina
    I'm considering buying the Sorby 8803H, large multi-tip tool, to make some large bowls that will have a small lip at the opening. Has anyone used this tool?
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2012
  2. Andrew Meyer

    Andrew Meyer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
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    Location (City & State):
    North Carolina
    I guess no one has ever used this tool....
     
  3. Bill Blasic

    Bill Blasic

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2006
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    524
    Location (City & State):
    Erie, PA
    Andrew,
    Although I have never used that exact tool I have in the past bought other Sorby Multi-tip tools. They never saw much use as I found other tools worked better for me. They were either given away or sold as they were just taking up space. See if you can find at least a place to look at one before you buy.
    Bill
     
  4. Andrew Meyer

    Andrew Meyer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
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    Location (City & State):
    North Carolina
    I did look at one. Since then, I've seen the Monster tools on their website. They look even better. Are there any others you'd suggest lookin at?
     
  5. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    Admittedly, I have never used one, but based on the design..

    it is one of those tools that looks like it would work great, and cutting with the tip straight won't present any problems, but handheld with the tip out >~30 degrees can lead to some bad things. The problem is handheld the wrist can only hold on for some much of a rotation and instinctively doesn't want to let go. The idea with a hollowing tool is you down want the line of the tip to the shaft to be much more than on center. Too much off center creates too much fulcrum and a greater ability to twist.
     
  6. DOCworks

    DOCworks

    Joined:
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    Location (City & State):
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    Andrew this tool is similar in design to the David Ellsworth hollowing tools except the head can articulate a bit. The main difference is the handle that David uses is 28+ inches long and is held differently with the stabilizing hand behind your side, kind of like holding a pool cue. The tool will twist when you take too big of a cut, which is fine. It takes some getting used to but the design works. Most of the other hollowing tools you will find the cutting tip is in line with the shaft and reduces the twisting torque produced but the other tool design. This is not necessarily better just different. Then you get into cutting tip design and material...HSS, Cobalt and Carbide. I would really reccomend getting with a local club and take a go on as many as you can before purchasing. I have used about half of the different ones out there and own 4 different types not including the ones I've made. They all have their place. The captured bar or the articutaled bar tools(much different than the Sorby tool) are the easiest to use, but also the most expensive...even if you make them. Sorry if this wasn't a lot of help. Short answer, I'd keep looking.
     

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