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So I bought a new lathe tool

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Mike Adams, Aug 1, 2020 at 9:56 AM.

  1. Mike Adams

    Mike Adams

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2020
    Messages:
    169
    Location:
    Bloomfield, New Jersey
    I picked up one of the Little Beaver's designed by Larry Martin (The Wood Whirler) from their current maker on Ebay.

    I love this thing. It's like having a super roughing gouge that works with bowl blanks. It has a square, radiused carbide cutter and a serious chip deflector. The tang is 1/2 inch.

    [​IMG]
     
    Mark Jundanian likes this.
  2. Mark Jundanian

    Mark Jundanian

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2018
    Messages:
    461
    Location:
    La Grange, IL
    Similar approach to mounting the cutter as Harrison's 90* detailer. Are you using the tool point on, or positionong the shaft 45* to the cut?
     
  3. Mike Adams

    Mike Adams

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2020
    Messages:
    169
    Location:
    Bloomfield, New Jersey
    I do have the Harrison tool. I bought a set of his full-size tools when I started experimenting with carbides some time back, right after trying a "New Edge Tools" (long since closed) carbide gouge for pens. It's okay for light duty, but the shaft is only a half inch and the tool tends to bounce around if when doing anything more than light cuts. I used mine mainly for grooves and a bit of spindle work. It's not beefy enough to be in the same league as this beast. Seriously.

    I tried both presentations today. I ran it perpendicular to the work and at 45. Perpendicular was great for knocking down the corners some and then I ran it back and forth at 45 and really hogged away wood getting the pieces round. The chip deflector isn't for show, either. When hogging, the tool throws out a serious chip stream.

    I've seen video of Larry using it to hollow a bowl, but haven't tried that yet.

    Even if I never use it for anything but bringing blanks to round it's worth every cent to me.
     
    Mark Jundanian likes this.
  4. robo hippy

    robo hippy

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2007
    Messages:
    2,710
    Location:
    Eugene, OR
    As far as I am concerned, scrapers are the most efficient tool for removing huge amounts of stock in a hurry. I use standard scrapers. If you have a round cutter in that, more for the inside, you can sweep it back and forth, and get pretty close to final shape so one or two passes with a gouge and you are done. I don't have a chip guard, so learned to stand just slightly off to the side to turn rather than standing in the throw zone of the shavings.

    robo hippy
     

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