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Shop Dust - How much do you really have?

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Mike Adams, Jul 1, 2020.

  1. Mike Adams

    Mike Adams

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2020
    Messages:
    173
    Location:
    Bloomfield, New Jersey
    Hi,

    I just setup a Wen air cleaner in the shop, and as other have posted before me, I went through the shop this morning with a dust mask and a blow gun. I'm monitoring the dust using this cool particle meter I bought from Banggood.com:
    [​IMG]
    I had it up to 150 pm2.5 particles and it's slowly dropping as the air cleaner does it's thing and far off dust settles again. I'll go around a few more times with the blow gun today until the meter stays in the green after blowing dust.

    I bought this particle meter for a different use, but now I think I'll hang it where I can see it while turning.

    Note: There are other particle meters that look like consumer products for about the same price.
     
  2. odie

    odie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    5,270
    Location:
    Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
    Are you monitoring your particle meter during different times of day, and while turning, and sanding?

    The WEN air filter is a worthwhile investment......however, I wonder how much dust is actually captured.....? I wouldn't be surprised to hear that it's less than 20%......

    I'm only using the WEN during sanding operations, but, I'm using a respirator nearly ALL the time.:D

    -----odie-----
     
  3. Mike Adams

    Mike Adams

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2020
    Messages:
    173
    Location:
    Bloomfield, New Jersey
    I'm sure planning to keep an eye on it. It took about 30 minutes to knock down the dust from the first blow from +250 to 7-8. Before I started, the dust was about constant at 15.

    [​IMG]

    You can see the discoloration on the rear filter. I bought a replacement set when I ordered the unit, so I'm ready to replace it after I'm satisfied that I've gotten the loose dust collected.

    Most of my turning is wet and I don't bother with a dust mask unless I start seeing dust while cutting or when sanding. I just need to mount it closer to the ceiling. My shop's in the basement of my 1924 home with 78" to the rafters. Maybe the Budget Committee will approve having a service line run out to the garage this year... I'd love to have my shop out of the house!
     
  4. Chris Edwards

    Chris Edwards

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2020
    Messages:
    53
    Location:
    Lebanon, TN
    I have the Jet equivalent, ceiling mounted. I also bought the washable outer filter, which looks like it does a pretty good job as the internal filters look very clean.

    I'm mainly a flat wood worker, with dust extraction on most of my tools, but it's amazing how much dust gets caught on the air cleaner filter after a couple of months.

    The shelves around my shop stay relatively dust free, which indicates, there's no a lot of dust that doesn't get captured.

    I often set it on the timer and let it run for about 4 hours after I leave my garage for the day.

    I'd love to get a dust/particle meter, but every time I get close to buying one, I find something else I'd rather have, or think I need.
     
  5. John Hicks

    John Hicks

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2020
    Messages:
    149
    Location:
    Hoodsport, Washington
    I put a 16" louvered exhaust fan behind my lathe It is much better at getting rid of the sanding dust than the two box air filters I had on the ceiling. Probably not good in the winter though. The box fans were hard to get to and plugged up too fast. I also run a 5 micron filtered dust collector while turning. The shop still gets a heavy coat of dust, no matter what I do. Once a month or so, I blow it all out the garage door with a stihl backpack blower!
     
  6. robo hippy

    robo hippy

    Joined:
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    2,721
    Location:
    Eugene, OR
    I have a friend who blows out his shop regularly. His method is to take a 42 inch air plane prop, mount it on a big electric motor, which is on a tripod, bolt the tripod to the floor, open the windows, and then turn on the motor and his blower. Takes about 20 minutes for all the dust to vacate the shop, which I think is 1800 ft. or more...

    robo hippy
     
    John Hicks likes this.
  7. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2017
    Messages:
    608
    Location:
    Jasper, Alabama
    Hi Odie, the respirator that you use, does it work for flumes also?
     
  8. odie

    odie

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    Location:
    Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
    Hi Lamar.......No, I don't believe either one is rated for fumes.......I'm using two respirators.......Resp-o-rator and Airstream.

    Talk to you later, Lamar. :D

    -----odie-----
     
    Lamar Wright likes this.
  9. John Torchick

    John Torchick

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Messages:
    2,592
    Location:
    Southeast Tennessee
    I use a box fan and furnace filter. I turn it on before I close the shop and run for 2-3 hours. Surprising what it removes. Wife saw this on a remodel job on HGTV. IMHO, only thing that came out useful for the channel.
     
    Lamar Wright likes this.
  10. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    Feb 6, 2010
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    1,697
    Location:
    Brandon, MS
    The thing about dust is you get it with all operations , yes even green turning. If you have a window close to the lathe you will see it in the sunlight.
    I have a JDS and a Jet. The JDS is plugged into the light system so when the main lights go on so does it. The Jet I have to turn on and set the timer which does not always happen:(. When cleaning the shop just blowing it off the shelf and allowing the filter to collect will get a very small amount of it because it settles in dead airspace. Also you will need to vacum the floor. Use that particle detector at floor level and see how much you stir just walking thru the shop.
    I am not too sure how much good it does leaving the filters on after closing the shop but that is recommended.
     
    Emiliano Achaval likes this.
  11. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Jul 26, 2016
    Messages:
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    Location:
    Nebraska
    The most far-reaching and potent outbreak of dust from the Sahara Desert in decades has begun to significantly affect the Lower 48 states, with air quality deteriorating markedly on the Gulf Coast on Friday. The dust, which hitched a ride along a ribbon of east-to-west winds about 5,000 miles from the Atlantic coast of Senegal and Mauritania, contains enough small particles at low altitudes to make air quality unhealthy, particularly for those with preexisting medical conditions, such as lung and heart ailments and asthma.

    You are breathing in dust, pollen, and other organic and inorganic particulates on a daily basis, your bodies natural defense system does a pretty good job getting rid of these foreign materials, however working in a high dust environment can overwhelm your bodies natural defense system.
     
  12. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    Mike you may be talking apples and oranges but I did not understand where you were coming from on this. For the dust we as woodturners and woodworkers are exposed to there is not only the immediate effect but also the long term.

    Immediate: SOB (shortness of breath) due to clogging of airways and nasal allergies. If you are asthmatic you should have already been taking precautions. Also allegies to various woods we work with for which some are already sensitized to to to preexisting allergies.

    Long term: the effects we get from repeated exposure to allergens (in this case dust) . Over long periods of time , sometime many years, we become sentized to dust of some or all woods and develop allergies. In addition as we age our capacities to handle dusty conditions usually deteriorate and we then cannot stay in dusty environments as long as we once could. Then there is the fact that if we inhale dust all the time it can fill the bronchioles in the lungs and pack in to stay.

    Now the dust from storms affect all of us in a immediate nature but is just something we have to deal with as it happens. Dust in the shop is a fact and must be dealt with on a daily consistent basis.
     
  13. Timothy Allen

    Timothy Allen

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    NH and ME
    Dust from storms and other natural sources is not something we can control, we can only react to it. Dust in our shops is a predictable product of the processes WE engage in, and thus it is something that we can consciously work to reduce and/or contain/collect...
     
  14. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    Not sure how this fits here Mike. Care to elaborate?
     
  15. Mike Adams

    Mike Adams

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    Location:
    Bloomfield, New Jersey
    Likely that would also blow down my house ;-)
     
  16. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Location:
    Nebraska
    People can turn a variety of materials on a lathe, each of these materials can have an impact on the person doing the turning. plenty of exotic and domestic woods which can be toxic along with polymer materials that woodturners use to stabilize or cast billets out of. You also have a number of turners that imbed a variety of organic and inorganic materials into turned items for decorative effects. Some woodturners are turning different types of soft stones and minerals which can also be a hazard. Plenty of adhesives and compounds used to assemble segmented billets turned on a lathe many of these also have short term and long term affects. Most of this sounds like common sense for experienced woodworkers, for a beginning woodturner air quality is one of those factors they usually learn the hard way unless they are given prior warning. How many newbies start off with a lathe, hand tools and worry about the environment they are turning in until later on when their budget allows? On average you have 150,000 lung cancer deaths each year which is directly attributed to air quality. Compare those numbers to a handful of people that take a billet to the head or cobble a Lichtenberg machine together out of microwave transformers. The air you breathe is one of those unseen environmental elements that people often times do not consider because you can not see it or touch it, much like radiation or electricity that has short term and long term detrimental affects. People in the Northwest were warned about volcanic ash when Mount Saint Helens popped off, much of that ash migrated to the east and contributed to the detriment of many that were unaware or ignored the hazard.

    FYI,
    The Saharan dust cloud brought dangerously high levels of fine particulate pollution (PM2.5, particles less than 2.5 microns or 0.0001 inch in diameter) and PM10 (particles less than 10 microns in diameter). Air pollution aggravates COVID-19 symptoms, leading to expected increases in hospital admissions from the disease in regions where dust concentrations spike.
     

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