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Shine juice goes dull

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by John Hicks, Sep 15, 2020.

  1. John Hicks

    John Hicks

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2020
    Messages:
    185
    Location (City & State):
    Hoodsport, Washington
    So I like to use shine juice quite a bit; but I have had problems with the finish going dull a few days after application. I'm wondering if this is normal? I seal the piece with zinsser's seal coat (thinned down 30%. Usually two or three coats of it. After drying for an hour or so, I sand it out with 400-600 and 3m white synthetic pads. Then I use a shine juice formula that I got from Capt Eddie's videos. I have experimented with speed and application techniques; also replaced the 1/3 rule, with a bit less walnut oil or boiled linseed oil.
    I get a nice shine after several (4-6) coats and it looks like glass. Several days later, it almost always goes dull as the oil dries out of the finish; re chucking and reapplying does help a bit, but that glass shine I had is gone.
    The only wood that seems to keep a shine, is super hard, closed grain types like walnut crotch or curly maple.

    I ask, is this an inherent problem with this type of finish? Or am I just messing everything up?
    I have had much better results lately with a water based lacquer that I used to spray on furniture (RESISTHANE) that is cut 60/40 with alcohol; and hand applied with a paper towel. But it is much more time intensive and less forgiving than shellac.
     
  2. Dennis J Gooding

    Dennis J Gooding

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2010
    Messages:
    556
    Location (City & State):
    Grants Pass Oregon
    John, I don't pretend to be an expert on finishes and do not know what shine juice is. I have used both walnut oil and BLO individually and observe that while wet, they are glossy but turn dull as they cure. (Rather slowly in the case of walnut oil if there is not strong ambient light). This has not been a problem for me, because I have used them for utilitarian pieces not show pieces. Have you tried buffing again after curing? I am a bit doubtful, because I doubt if either oil would cure to to produce the rock hard surface that one usually wants for buffing.
     
  3. GRJensen

    GRJensen

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2011
    Messages:
    157
    Location (City & State):
    Bay Settlement, WI
    "Shine Juice" is equal parts of Boiled Linseed Oil, Shellac, and Denatured Alcohol. It is not a very durable finish, and does tend to lose its luster over time.
     
  4. Russell Nugent

    Russell Nugent

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2019
    Messages:
    146
    Location (City & State):
    Bashaw, Alberta
    I find it loses it's shine after a few days. I found the same thing with a couple of other friction products. Benefits from a good buffing after that but I've pretty much given up on it except in winter when I can't spray laquer. I'll use it on some Christmas ornaments when I need to get them done for Christmas after forgetting to do them till Christmas eve.
     
    John Hicks and Tim Connell like this.
  5. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1,746
    Location (City & State):
    Brandon, MS
    I have a bowl from cottonwood that I used shine juice on in 2013 and it still has the same gloss tho not a high gloss it does shine. I use shellac from flakes and that may be a part of your problem. But then I have had good results on furniture using shellac to create a French Polish. I did not like the shine juice because you have to use the lathe and it does get tedious. On the good side it is easy to take off problem areas and redo that finish when the first efforts do not look right.
     

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