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Sharpening Jigs

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by Chris Bresette, Sep 1, 2018.

  1. Chris Bresette

    Chris Bresette

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    Sep 1, 2018
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    Location (City & State):
    Kansas City, Missouri
    I have just started my attempts at wood turning and need some advice. I have purchased a lathe and some chisels (Robert Sorby), but have been advised that the tools may not be as sharp as they need to be (even though they are brand new). In any event, I was also told that the Wolverine sharpening systems were the tools that I need. My research has shown that there are two selections: (1) Wolverine Grinding Jig and (2) Wolverine Vari-Grind Jig.

    My question to the experienced turners is, "Which of these jigs should I purchase, or should I purchase both?"
     
  2. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Turning tools need to be sharpened often. On a small natural edge bowl I will sharpen at least 4 times.
    New tools are usually not real sharp and if they were they would need to be sharpened after some minutes of use.

    The woulverine is by far the most widely used sharpening system.

    The woulverine jig is the basic system -2 tracks, platform, and a pocket.
    The varigrind is an add on to the woulverine system that facilitates sharpening finger nails grinds and wing grinds on gouges.

    Most commonly the grinder and tracks are mounted on plywood. Grinders often need a spacer tor raise them the correct distance above the tracks. They could also be bolted or screwed onto the top of a bench or table.

    These are the two,items as shown on the ONEWAY web site.
    B65B468B-DA13-491B-B459-7C843EE83888.jpeg C637E556-686C-41FF-B90E-A1006D118E2C.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2018
    Chris Bresette likes this.
  3. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I think that most everyone gets both. The Varigrind is used to sharpen bowl gouges and spindle gouges. There are two versions of the Varigrind, the Original and the Varigrind II. Most people use the original because it is more versatile in the shapes of grinds that it can put on a gouge.

    The platform is used for most everything else. I bought the skew sharpening attachment for the Wolverine about 15 years ago and I don't remember ever using it.

    As Al said most tools don't come sharp enough to use and even if they did, it is necessary to sharpen them frequently .... several times just while turning one piece.

    It would be a tremendous benefit to attend your local AAW woodturning chapter, the Kansas City Woodturners to get paired up with a mentor. It will save you lots of frustration and put you light years ahead of trying to figure out the basics on your own.

    Here is their website: http://kcwoodturners.org
     
  4. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    There are several companies that make this style of sharpening jig, the complete system allows quick and easy sharpening of most lathe tools.
     
    Chris Bresette likes this.
  5. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    I have the Wolverine system and really like it. I am a perfectionist and almost went bonkers setting up the system of a piece on 3/4 inch plywood. Setting the centers of the wheels, centers of the tracks, etc. were a chore. I installed it on a Rikon slow speed grinder I got on sale at Woodcraft. I don't have the Vari-grind but it's on the list.
     
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  6. Chris Bresette

    Chris Bresette

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    This is great advice and I will do just that. Thanks!
     
  7. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    I was at Woodcraft and they have the Rikon grinder on sale at $99.95 or such. I treated myself to a birthday present and bought the Vari Grind for my bowl and spindle gouges. Told the Mrs. who came by to check on me that the kids can give me $$$ toward it. Will post a question as a separate thread.
     
  8. Perry Hilbert

    Perry Hilbert

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    Sep 27, 2017
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    Location (City & State):
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    I initally learned to turn decades ago before jigs, before fancy bowel gouge grinds etc. I can sharpen a skew or roughing gouge just fine free hand. The fingernail grinds are a devil to do without a jig and it takes lots of experience to get them free hand. Last night, a guy at my turning club demonstrated a hooked shaped scraper. The guy could actually reach back up underneath and do an under cut while spindle or bowl turning. I have never seen anything do a cove so fast. It was something he developed while tinkering in his shop. I looked closely at the thing and for the life of me, I could not figure out why it works so well. The man free hands all his grinds. What he turns in an hour takes me a day..
     
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