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Recommendation of a basic dust collector.

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by Glen Schultz, Jun 2, 2019.

  1. Glen Schultz

    Glen Schultz

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2019
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    Location (City & State):
    Pawcatuck, CT.
    I am setting up a small shop for turning and my other basic wood working to which I am adding a DW735 planer so dust and chip recovery will now be essential.
    Any guidance?
    I was looking at a Rikon for 299 at Woodcraft but first would like some input.
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. William Rogers

    William Rogers

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    Mar 19, 2016
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    Location (City & State):
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    Glen, From my experience I wouldn't get anything smaller than a 1.5hp. I started with a 1hp and it just didn't seem to ever have enough for my tools. The 1.5 hp Jet wasn't bad, as I was dragging the hose from. machine to machine. Many have bought the HF DC and seem to like them starting out. They also put a home made trash can separator in front it the to remove the heavy chips. Search Thien separator for plans for this. I bought a used Jet 3hp several years ago from CL for $250 and eventually added a inexpensive cyclone ($200) to it. Bigger is better.

    DC.jpg
     
  3. john lucas

    john lucas AAW Forum Expert

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    Grizzly makes.some.nice ones priced right. The bigger the better. I dont like the trash can chip collectors. They seem to reduce the volume of air going into the main hose. 1100 cfm is minimum in my opinion but anything you use is better than nothing. Collectors dont work all that good for some machines and great for others. Chip collection for lathes is not good but what your trying to get is the fine dust and they do that.
     
  4. Dan Bevilacqua

    Dan Bevilacqua

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    I have a small shop also. That is why I am sticking with my Seco UFO-90 (1 hp) (12.6 amp)(added felt bag). It is adequate for going from tool to tool. I have had it since 1993, and it still runs great. Fits nicely into a little space that is out of the way when I am done using it. The base has roller so it moves around easily from machine to machine.

    I considered going larger; but, it just will not be a good fit in my small shop. They have a newer model available on the Home Depot website, and although it looks similar as far as size and configuration, I know nothing about comparison of other factors.

    I have seen the Rikon you reference that I saw at Woodcraft a while ago, and from my recollection, it looked about the same size. If I ever need to replace mine, that is the size with which I will go, unless I get a nice big shop :D.
     
  5. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    I soon got tired of the first dust collector I got, a 1 hp on wheels with a cloth bag. When I got the bigger shop, I got a 3 hp Oneida centralized system, which as far as I am concerned, makes the best systems out there. ("Clear View" is another system that gets good reviews, though I haven't heard much about them lately.) They do have smaller foot print systems for the smaller shops. Not in every one's price range. If you have a small corner in the shop, or even wall space, they can fit in pretty well. I do prefer the 'Lone Ranger' start/stop system for remote control as you don't have to point it at the system to turn it off and on. I keep 2 of them handy. The one in the turning area stays on a clip on the wall because the first one vanished in a bag of shavings, or at least I think that is where it went. The second one in the flat work area floats from tool to tool. While the cloth bags are okay, the pleated filters are far better, in part because they offer far more surface area to vent through, so generally you get better air flow. They also offer much finer filtering.

    robo hippy
     
  6. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    No experience with Rikon. I have a Grizzly 1.5 hp that is at least 22 years old. It is a 220v and I have added a pleated canister filter (which added greatly to suction) and this year replaced my home made cyclone with a Dust Deputy ( 5 inch inlet and 6 out) and addded even more to suction. Mine will stay on almost all the time I am in the shop and using the longranger is great but not I just turn in on and leave it.
     
  7. Hy Tran

    Hy Tran

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    Location (City & State):
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    For many years, I had the 1 HP Rikon dust collector. You'll want to buy an aftermarket filter that gets you down to 1 micrometer (1 micron) particle size. The standard Rikon filter, I think, is a 5 micron bag. I can't speak as to whether it has enough volume flow to suck out a planer. For my needs at the time, including a ~$50-ish aftermarket 1 micron bag (American Fabric Filters?), it was fine for capturing sanding dust when turning. Do minimize hose length (in other words, cut the hose to minimum length necessary!)

    Hy
     
  8. Rob Fridenberg

    Rob Fridenberg

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    Location (City & State):
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    Is there a reason that HEPA rated dust collectors do not seem to be in use by the many experienced turners on here?

    Thanks!
     
  9. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    If you keep your tools sharp and know the proper angle to address the wood at you won't need a dust collector, you will only have long continuous wood shavings coming off of the lathe. ;)
     
  10. Russell Nugent

    Russell Nugent

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    Whatever dust collector you get you probably won't even need to turn on with a dewalt 735. The powered chip ejection is pretty crazy. Throws chips clear across my shop. Just hook up the hose and it'll do the rest.
     
  11. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    The dust collector bags and filters used to come with micron ratings. Now they have the HEPA ratings. With the new one for my Oneida, it comes out to some thing like less than 1/2 micron.

    Mike, no matter how sharp your tools are, you still create dust. The edges of the shavings fragment, and if you walk on them at all, or when you sweep and scoop up, dust rises in the air... Then there is sanding....

    robo hippy
     
  12. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    The only people who don't sand are liars. :D
     
    Gerald Lawrence likes this.
  13. Glen Schultz

    Glen Schultz

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    Location (City & State):
    Pawcatuck, CT.
    Thanks for all the input.
    I bought a 1.5HP Shop Fox ( Felt bag up top and clear plastic bag down below.
    It came with a 4 inch "Y" inlet so I installed a blast gate on each side and reduced one side to 2-1/2" for the smaller machines and drill press.
    Works great but with almost all the newer stuff China has it's affect on longevity.
    Time will tell.
     
  14. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    I have a Shop Vac that I hook up to the lathe or BS. It gets some of the fine stuff at the lathe plus it pulls the CA fumes in and keeps the shop from smelling like a chemical factory. My dust collection system consists of a broom and dust pan; then the power tools get a cleaning with a shop brush from HF and then I vacuum the floor. Would love to have a DC system but no room inside or outside the shop.
     
  15. Dennis Weiner

    Dennis Weiner

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    I have an Oneida economical internal filter system with Leason 2hp 240v that I bought 19 years ago and it’s extremely reliable. I have never Replaced the filter all these years but I do blow it out every now with compressed air. I don’t know if they still offer free engineering but they provided it back then. It was very useful. Their products and services are first class. I would call them for mentoring.
     
  16. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    Some times I 'forget' to check levels in the DC. Since I cut bowl blanks end grain wise, I get long strings of blade shavings inside the filter. Being frustrated with trying to tap the sides of the paper filter to get all the shavings out of the pleats, once I took it out in the back yard and used the garden hose to clean it out. Worked excellently, and no dust blowing around.

    Oneida will still design your duct work for you. With the move to my new shop, I was able to use all of the old duct materials, and don't have any runs longer than what used to be in the old shop, even though new place is more than double the size...

    robo hippy
     

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