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Recommendation for oneway easy core

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by John Hicks, Aug 2, 2020.

  1. John Hicks

    John Hicks

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2020
    Messages:
    185
    Location (City & State):
    Hoodsport, Washington
    What template did you make or buy to use the easy core system? Is there a laser available for this system? I can't seem to find one.
    Also, is the carbide cutter worth the cost?
     
  2. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

    Joined:
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    Location (City & State):
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    Basically this tool cuts an arc if you have a ruler you can mark the depth the blade will cut to.
    If there is enough of the big bowl left you are good to go.

    A laser would let you know where you are cutting and when the core is about to break loose.
    After you do a 5 cores you would probably not use the laser again.
    Because you will know the things it tells you from experience because the cut arc is always the same and the core wobbles before it breaks free.
     
    Josh Stevens likes this.
  3. guy laizure

    guy laizure

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2010
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    14
    Location (City & State):
    Farmington Hills,Michigan
    Glenn Lucas has a downloadable demo of how to use the Oneway coring system.
     
  4. Roger Wiegand

    Roger Wiegand

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    Yes, the carbide cutters are worth their weight in gold, which is about what they cost. Kidding aside, they stay sharp much, much longer. Night and day difference. I'm told, but haven't yet tried myself, that they make coring in dry wood a reasonable experience. Every 5-10 or so cores I hit the top with a diamond paddle for a quick honing, I haven't had to do a "real" resharpening yet.

    I believe there is now a third party provider of carbide cutters of a somewhat different design. They might be worth exploring but the sticker shock may be shocking.
     
    John Hicks likes this.
  5. Damon McLaughlin

    Damon McLaughlin

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2017
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    276
    Location (City & State):
    Eastern Washington
    When I had my easy core system I made a laser for it using a couple dowels, a flat piece of wood and a laser pointer from the pet store. There were three positions for the laser, one for each size cutter. It worked well for the times I used it.
     
  6. Randy Anderson

    Randy Anderson

    Joined:
    May 25, 2019
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    Eads, TN
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    Yes the carbide cutters are worth it. They do last a lot longer and are easy to touch up to stay sharp. I don't have a laser but made an extension post for the cutter arm. It fits into the hole the arm goes into and extends upward enough to clear most any bowl I have in place. The top of the post has a hole drilled that the cutter sits into. Lets me get a top down visual of the arc of the cutter and where I will likely hit center or be close enough to try and snap it off by hand. Not exact since I have to look down on it to see where it swings and will end up but works well enough. And of course the spacer between the mounting base and the head stock to make sure I am in no risk of running into my chuck.
     
    John Hicks likes this.
  7. James Seyfried

    James Seyfried

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    Jan 7, 2012
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    Location (City & State):
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    I made these so I would know how deep the cutting knife will go. I think it is sort of what a laser would tell you, they work well for me.
    index.php
     
  8. robo hippy

    robo hippy

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2007
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    2,802
    Location (City & State):
    Eugene, OR
    When I core, I remove the largest blank first. This is because I turn green to final thickness, and use a forstner bit to drill a recess in the top of the bowl to mount, rather than using a face plate, so each core already has a center mount ready. You can set up the blade first, and pivot it through the arc to make sure it clears your chuck jaws and leaves at least 1/2 inch thickness. I also made some plywood spacers like Jim shows, but made mine so one side of the rectangle was for one blade, and the other side was for the next size up or down. I still prefer the McNaughton...

    robo hippy
     

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