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Protective finish for dyed bowl

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Darrell Stokes, Jan 6, 2021.

  1. Darrell Stokes

    Darrell Stokes

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    I recently made this bowl for my sister. It's maple with Chestnut brand aniline dye on the inside. I didn't want to darken the color of the bare maple, so I buffed with the Beall system and only used Renaissance wax as a finish.

    My sister will probably use it for jewelry, pocket change, things like that, so the wax will wear off very fast and then the thin layer of dye will get scratched up. I'd like to add something more protective to the inside, but I'm not too keen on spray lacquer for this one. What would you use?
     

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  2. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I use Waterlox over dyed pieces.
    The first coat needs to be light as some of the dye can dissolve into the finish.

    often the first coat looks dull.

    With multiple coats the colors begin to pop
     
  3. Darrell Stokes

    Darrell Stokes

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    Thanks! Do you think it'd be ok over Renaissance wax, or would I need to remove it? (Not too easy to do without damaging the dye.)
     
  4. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    The wax will not allow a good adherence of finish. That said it is a gamble in that "maybe" the finish will adhere and then to remove the wax will remove the stain. Might be able to remove the wax with mineral spirits but alcohol is best and that will remove much but not all of Chestnut Stains since it has shellac (alcohol soluble) in it. however if too much stain is removed you can dilute it and reapply to get the shade you want.
     
  5. Darrell Stokes

    Darrell Stokes

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    It's a conundrum! Thanks for your responses, both of you.
     
  6. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I’m with @Gerald Lawrence . Not much way to remove the wax except using alcohol and that will bring up some of the dye too.
    so once you removed the wax and stain you would want to sand and dye it and cut the rim again.
    If all goes well it would look as good as it does now. But you could turn another in about the same time.
     
  7. Doug Freeman

    Doug Freeman

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    Mineral spirits or naptha will remove the wax. For a dyed surface like you have, a film forming sprayed finish is the best solution. Build enough film to be able to rub it out. Why not spray lacquer? You can get rattle can shellac as well. Another option is to pad on, or french polish, shellac. Difficult to get a perfect finish over a sealed surface with wipe on varnish.
     
  8. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    Not Shellac as that would redisolve the dye and maybe create more runs. The lacquer is the way I always go with Chestnut Stains
     
  9. Karl Loeblein

    Karl Loeblein

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    I’ve have good luck using rattle can polyurethane which doesn’t seem dissolve the Chestnut dye as easily as lacquer (which has lacquer thinner). If you do use lacquer spray then use very light coats at first.
     
  10. Darrell Stokes

    Darrell Stokes

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    @hockenbery @Gerald Lawrence @Doug Freeman @Karl Loeblein Thanks for all of your good advice. I've used rattle-can lacquer on previous dyed bowls with good success. I was going for a different look for this one, but should have stuck with lacquer! Probably the best thing now is to remove the wax, sand, and re-dye, like Al says.
     
  11. Doug Freeman

    Doug Freeman

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    The alcohol in spray shellac will not dissolve the dye shellac any more readily than the thinner in lacquer. Either can be used, in the same way, couple of light coats to start. I have done both.
     
  12. Curt Fuller

    Curt Fuller

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    A little late here, but in my experience finishing aniline dyed pieces lacquer works fine UNLESS you have a distinct line or border you want to keep natural. Then lacquer will often cause the dye to blead into the natural area. It all depends on what you're trying to do but if you can burn a wire line along the border that works pretty well to both keep the initial dye from bleeding and the lacquer from causing it to bleed. Poly finishes don't seem to cause much bleeding.
     
  13. Darrell Stokes

    Darrell Stokes

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    I have had success with spray-can lacquer before, and it didn't breach the border—but the border was the inside rim. You can probably see in the reflection inside the bowl that I didn't fully get rid of the orange peel in all places—mostly, but not entirely. That was one of the reasons I didn't use lacquer on the new one. I thought I could take the easy way out and just wax it!
     

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  14. Richard Coers

    Richard Coers

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    If you use a good touch up gun instead of an aerosol can, most all of your orange peel woes will go away. Aerosol cans have horrible nozzles.
     
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  15. Breck Whitworth

    Breck Whitworth Sharp Dressed Woodturner

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    Not all spray lacquered pieces have to be high gloss, I've had good results over dyed pieces using clear flat or matte spray lacquer. Just a thought.
     
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  16. Doug Freeman

    Doug Freeman

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    Yes, most any spray gun, even a cheap one from HF, can be made to spray solvent lacquer. Need about a compressor tho, or a turbine sprayer.
     
  17. Darrell Stokes

    Darrell Stokes

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    I'd love to invest in this and probably will eventually, but right now I'm saving for a bigger lathe! And after that on the list is a "real" dust-collection system. So for now it's rattle cans!
     
  18. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    The orange peel dilemma is fairly easy to avoid. Mostly causes by applying too much or too little lacquer. When I slowed down my swing with a spray gun or a can most of the problems ended. Oh and as to buffing use a slower speed
     
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