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Proper tool use

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by Cecil Dean, Aug 19, 2013.

  1. Cecil Dean

    Cecil Dean

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    Aug 7, 2013
    Messages:
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    Location (City & State):
    Montana
    As a newbie I am looking for a book that shows the proper way to use the difference basics tools I have for my lathe. I would like something that shows proper angle etc. and when to use each type of tool.
    Thanks
     
  2. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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  3. CTutor

    CTutor

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    Nov 29, 2005
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    turning books

    I like "Ellsworth on Woodturning". His videos are also very good. There are so many good ones out there it is difficult to pick just one or two.
     
  4. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Location (City & State):
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    If your interest is in turning bowls
    The Ellsworth book is excellent. Raffan on Bowls is good too and a bit more general.
    A large number of successful turners use the Ellsworth ground gouge and many of the techniques David uses.
    So the Ellsworth book is a good place to start if your goal is bowls and/or hollow forms.


    If your interest is spindle turning. The " Practical woodturner" by Paine. Or " Fundamental of woodturning" by Darlow

    I strongly encourage you to get hands-on instruction. It speeds the learning process immeasurably.
    Local clubs are a great source for mentors etc. I see you are in Montana. It a big place with relatively few woodturners so it may not be as easy for you to hookup with other turners but it will be well worth the effort.




    Maybe a trip the rocky mountain symposium......

    Al
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2013
  5. john lucas

    john lucas AAW Forum Expert

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    Location (City & State):
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    For books i like raffen's and Ellsworths. If you interested in bowls get Bill Grumbines video on bowl turning. Feel free to go to youtube a d view any of my videos. Just type in john60lucas in the search block
     
  6. Mike Peace

    Mike Peace

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    I like Taunton's The Complete Illustrated Guide to Woodturning by Richard Raffan. It is a great reference book for just about all things woodturning.
     
  7. Don O. Jr.

    Don O. Jr.

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    Location (City & State):
    Schenectady, NY
    I think one of the best books is Keith Rowley's "Woodturning:A Foundation Course."

    Very good advice on getting some personal instruction too.
     
  8. Hu Lowery

    Hu Lowery

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    Location (City & State):
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    Lots of good info on youtube, lots of junk too!

    A lot of good info on youtube, a lot of bad info too. You can find video by a handful of the active posters on here on youtube. I searched out most of them including John Lucas'. All good info!

    Someone else who has excellent youtube video, very good quality, close ups, and very good information, is Lyle Jamieson. I watched his tool handling video's a couple times a week for awhile, need to watch them again now to make sure bad habits don't sneak in. He has excellent grinding video too and his own signature grind which I try to mostly copy. A modified Ellsworth as are many of the signature grinds. If turning bowls or hollow forms the swept back wings are much much easier to use than square or near square wings for most areas inside and out. Tightish inside curves need something different sometimes but they should probably be avoided by us beginners anyway.

    One thing, there are many ways to skin a cat and many ways to turn wood and get to a finished product. If you use any of the master turner's process start to finish you can get a very good result. However, gonna make that a big bold however, sometimes you can get in trouble taking a little from one master and a little from another!

    Find one person whose work you admire and is much like you want to do and try to learn how they do things to have a good basic foundation. You can always branch out and certainly will if you turn wood very long but the solid foundation is important.

    Hu
     
  9. Cecil Dean

    Cecil Dean

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    Location (City & State):
    Montana
    Thanks to everyone for your suggestion and help.
    Cecil
     
  10. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Check the local library. Ours has a good book by Mike Darrow (I think that is correct).
     
  11. John Lawson

    John Lawson

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    Location (City & State):
    The Adirondacks
    Mike Darlow
     
  12. John Nesmith

    John Nesmith

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    Tallahassee, FL
  13. KellyDunn

    KellyDunn

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    Cecil, as has been suggested hands on is best. There are 4 AAW chapters in Montana. Whitefish, Great falls, Belgrade and Billings. If you are close to any of those places make contact and see if they have a mentor program. Or folks that will let you watch them turn. Club meetings often include turning in some manner. Many clubs also bring in outside demo folks. Having someone show you how to sharpen a tool. Show you how a particular grind can be presented to the wood for a given effect. You can look at videos or read books. My opinion is they are best for folks that know turning basics. You can get those basics real fast one on one. Then books and videos will make much more sense. My 2c.
     
  14. Bill Bulloch

    Bill Bulloch

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    Location (City & State):
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    Check out Lyle Jamison's videos on Youtube.
     

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