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Oneway Stronghold Chuck Question

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by Steve Kephart, Mar 24, 2020.

  1. Steve Kephart

    Steve Kephart

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    Feb 15, 2020
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    Location (City & State):
    Nipomo, California
    My Oneway stronghold chuck was delivered yesterday along with my Jet 1840 lathe. I am new and have never turned anything. I followed the instructions on installing the chuck by screwing until it contacts the spindle shoulder, then locking the spindle, unscrew the chuck slightly, then give it a firm spin. It came with the adapter on. When I tried to remove it I discovered that the screws were not installed in the adapter. The chuck just slide off the adapter, then I had a heck of a time getting the adapter off. Before I put the chuck back on I was wonder how hard it is to remove when the adapter is screwed in.

    Also, it came without the set screws to lock the adapter to the spindle and cautioned that damage may occur it used. Should the set screws be used if I were to use the reverse for sanding etc.

    Thanks for the help for what may be simple questions. I have joined a local club but the first meeting was canceled and in California it maybe some time before everything is back to normal.
     
  2. BobCoates

    BobCoates

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2008
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    If you call oneway I am sure they will send you the screws. As far as the screw to lock the adapter, I don't think they provide one. My 3 std oneway don't have any. I may have purchased one at HD, but seldom use it. The one or two times I run in reverse don't have a problem with the chuck backing off.
    Bob
     
  3. Dave Landers

    Dave Landers

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    I have drilled out a dimple where the set screw seats from the adapter into the chuck body (vicmarc chuck, but a set screw is a set screw). Before I did that, I had the adapter come loose a couple times. The dimple just gives the set screw something to set in.

    There are several schools of thought on the chuck-to-spindle connection. I've been very successful by giving the chuck a final little "flick" to seat it on the spindle. It takes a bump to get it loose, but for me that's usually lock the spindle and bump the chuck key with my palm.
    Never had problem with it coming loose either when spinning down or reverse turning.

    Now, that technique goes really bad if there's any sort of damage to the seating face on the spindle or chuck (or even debris in there) - it'll lock on and you'll have a heckuva time getting it off.

    So you will find turners who swear by a little plastic washer. Makes the chuck come off easier. You can make one from the side of a milk jug, or you can buy one. I don't use one, so can't comment on how it works. I'm sure someone will.

    I've also talked to turners who swore you absolutely have to lock down the set screw to the spindle. And others who complained about the damage that does to a spindle. Certainly, if you use the set screw, make sure it's either all the way set, or all the way out. Loosen it half way and remove the chuck, you will drag that set screw across all your spindle threads, and that's not good.
     
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  4. John Walls

    John Walls

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    Jan 20, 2020
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    Location (City & State):
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    Found out the same as you with my Talon, adapter was installed in chuck, 3 screws securing it was not. Turned a couple pieces before I found them missing. I would not install a screw myself to hold chuck onto lathe, it would bugger up the threads. I don't see a need to do that unless your lathe has brakes, mine doesn't and is fine, so far.
     
  5. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

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    Oct 25, 2005
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    Location (City & State):
    Newberg, OR: 20mi SW of Portland: AAW #21058
    Not sure what you're asking exactly...

    1) When the adapter is properly secured to the chuck with the three cap screws, it won't come off the chuck. Even when you want to remove the adapter, you have to use two of the cap screws in the two opposing holes to drive the adapter off the chuck body.

    2) The chuck and properly secured adapter can be difficult to remove from the spindle if you "snap" it on with too much enthusiasm. When I "snap" it on, the chuck is only backed off from mating with the spindle flange by 1/8 turn or so -- and even then, it's not a very hard "snap".

    The spindle screws are easily obtained from a hardware store - probably 20¢ ea.. They are merely metric Allen screws using the same blue Allen wrench as the jaws. I don't lock my chucks to the spindle often but it is certainly advised and helpful when you have a very large turning running backwards. The forces exerted against the screw friction are large when you are working 8-12 inches away from the spindle axis. As to harming the spindle if you try to back off the chuck without releasing the Allen screws, the spindle should be hardened steel while the screws are not. Is there an unthreaded section of the spindle where the set screws are to land? If you don't have that, then I'd not use them.
     
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  6. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    You're talking about a Vicmarc chuck where the spindle adapter screws into the chuck body, but that isn't the way that the Oneway Stronghold chuck works. The spindle adapter mates with the chuck body via a precision machine taper ... the same principle as a Morse taper. The screws in question perform basically the same function as a Morse taper drawbar. Years ago I snapped one of the cap screws while changing inserts so I called Oneway and talked to Kevin. He said that I shouldn't ever reuse the screws because of potential metal fatigue. He also said that the only socket head cap screws he would recommend are Unbrako grade 8 screws. He added never use hardware store screws even if they are rated grade 8. He was nice enough to send me new screws free of charge. There aren't many places where you can get a deal like that.

    I agree that a very light flick is plenty. Usually I just do a gentle snug. Unless the register face on the spindle or the chuck insert has a defect there should not be any need for a slam together fit.

    BTW, if you want to use a setscrew to lock the chuck to the spindle DO NOT get the typical hardware store type that has a sharp cup on the tip. That type of setscrew is meant for one-time permanent fastening. Instead go to McMaster-Carr and get one of the rounded nose type setscrews that won't damage the spindle.
     
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  7. Doug Freeman

    Doug Freeman

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    Location (City & State):
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    Dont know about the jet 1840, but my Nova Galaxi comes set for aggressive braking, transferring significant reverse torque requiring a set screw for the chuck. The braking is adjustable but I like it aggressive - quickly stops for inspections. Yes the set screw tips (multiple chucks the dont all stop in the same place) leave dimples on the spindle. Little file work a few times to remove the raised burrs and no more issue. The chuck set screw gets tightened every time a chuck goes on.
     
  8. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I tighten chucks and faceplates with a firm push using either the key, Tommy bar, or spanner wrench. Then it always releases with a firm pull.

    A flick is just too variable and if I over do it it is hard to get off.
    It’s well worth the time to lock the spindle and give a little push.


    The screws for holding the insert in the strong hold chuck serve two functions
    1. They hold the insert in place using the unthreaded holes in the insert aligned with the threaded holes in the chuck
    2. The serve as jack screws to pull the insert free by going into the threaded holes and pushing against the chuck.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2020
  9. Brad Winesett

    Brad Winesett

    Joined:
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    The plastic washer as Dave mentioned is what I use. It definitely helps in removing the chuck from the spindle.
     
  10. Dave Landers

    Dave Landers

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    Well that's a pretty cool design.
     
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  11. odie

    odie

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    There seems to be a bit of controversy on just how to "set" the Oneway Stronghold chuck to the spindle.....or other brands, for that matter! I have four Stronghold chucks, and have been using them since the early 1990's. Yes, you can overdo it, and end up with the aggravation of breaking loose a stuck chuck. I've "been there, and done that", but this is like anything that requires a little acquired sense to "know" how much is too much, and how much is not enough! ;)

    For a time, I tried the plastic washer, but have come to prefer the solid contact of metal to metal......and, the confidence that comes with it that braking the spindle won't break loose the grip between chuck and spindle, without the use of a set screw. (I can remember using the plastic washer, and ruining a bowl that came loose after braking the spindle. It slammed against the tool rest. There was no set screw. (I've never been a fan of using a set screw to lock the chuck to the spindle.) This is a lesson that you only need one "accident" to figure out just what went wrong, and what it takes to overcome the issue! :rolleyes: )

    Instead of locking the spindle, I simply grab the handwheel before giving it the "flick", and that is plenty of stability to "set" the chuck to the spindle. For removal, I use a spindle wrench to lock the spindle to the bedways......but, I think many lathes do not have this option anymore. (Al, having owned a Woodfast lathe, will probably recall that it has a large hex nut on the spindle, and a factory supplied wrench for that nut!) The chuck is easy to remove that way, by using the chuck key for a small bit of leverage.

    Keep on turnin', gentlemen! :D

    -----odie-----

    3  (1) - Copy.jpg
     
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