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New dust mask

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by BobCoates, Jan 6, 2020.

  1. BobCoates

    BobCoates

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  2. Mike Zip Hamilton

    Mike Zip Hamilton

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    If this unit had MSA, OSHA approval, that would probably be in the product info. Good luck getting it under a face shield.
     
    Tim Tucker likes this.
  3. Fred Belknap

    Fred Belknap

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    Bob, it looks good. The only thing I see that rings the alarm bell is the price. High-end power respirators may cost ten times that price or more. I have been a Grizzly customer for years and some of their products are more than worth the money, and some not so much. My advice is to read the reviews and research what others have to say about this product. It just might be great.
     
    Tim Tucker likes this.
  4. BobCoates

    BobCoates

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    I agree the price is great, wondered about using a mask. I got a jsp in july and works ok, but if I had seen this may have given it a try. Interesting to see more comments.or some willing to take the plunge....
    Bob
     
  5. Bill Blasic

    Bill Blasic

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    That mask has been sold for years as the WoodRiver Power Mask Powered Respirator. I included it in a review in More Woodturning Magazine. I purchased one about 5 or 6 years ago from Peach Tree Woodworking Supply I think it was. New to Grizzly but not new at Woodcraft or Rockler or Amazon when available.
     
    Tim Tucker likes this.
  6. Richard Coers

    Richard Coers

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  7. Mike Adams

    Mike Adams

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    0.3 micron would qualify it for N95 if it had been rated. I'm not impressed with the design. It seems a bit flimsy and toy-like to me.
     
  8. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Particle size by itself is insufficient information to say what the rating is. A filter that is rated N95 or P95 will remove 95% of particles 0.3 microns or larger. A filter that is rated N100 or P100 will remove 99.97% of particles 0.3 microns or larger.
     
  9. Mike Adams

    Mike Adams

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    Since it isn't rated, yes. But to obtain an N95, the 0.3 spec is sufficient. I'm sticking with what I'm using.
     
  10. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I think that is a smart move.

    To meet the N95 spec requirement, the filter must capture 95% of 0.3 micron particles. A filter that captured a smaller amount of 0.3 micron particles (for example, 50%) obviously can't be a N95 or P95 or R95 filter.
     
  11. Mike Zip Hamilton

    Mike Zip Hamilton

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    I've been retired long enough that I've forgotten much of what l knew about respirators, but one point that is neglected on this topic is fit. Paper masks that many use provide a poor fit and would be unlikely to pass a fit test. Many have great concern about grinding newer metal tools. Do we have data that shows a danger? Welding or otherwise vaporizing these metals produce particles that we can absorb, but does grinding?
     
  12. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Heavy metal poisoning from breathing metal dust is a serious health hazard. Some of the dust produced by grinding is so fine that it can stay in the air for hours. Here is a study on lung function deterioration from metal exposure. There are a number of other heavy metals that are woodturners are exposed to as a result of exotic high speed steel alloys being used for turning tools.
     
  13. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    Bill I did not read the entire report only parts, however it appears to be based on exposure in a manufacturing plant. In that case the exposure will be maybe 100X what we will find in a home shop. Not to degrade the risk as yes I remember getting dust in my nose from grinding the mower blade and maybe felt a little respiratory distress. My conclusion is that if there is metal dust in the air for a long time are we to wear dust mask all the time we are in the shop?
     
  14. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Obviously we won't find any studies about metal dust exposure in a woodturners workshop, but it should be obvious that breathing any amount of heavy metal dust (or any type of dust) will have some effect on the respiratory system. Not knowing anything about the need for respiratory protection before I got into woodturning, I've spent a lifetime breathing all sorts of dust including asbestos, beryllium brake pad dust, grinder dust, lead fumes, mercury, dust from mowing hay, wood dust, etc. It's only recently that I've experienced the cumulative effect of ignoring respiratory protection. Decreased lung capacity has made recovery from my recent open heart surgery a very slow and difficult process.
     
  15. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    On a windy day when you can see dust particulate in the air, we are breathing various amounts of pollens, molds, organics, minerals, bacteria etc. etc., your bodies immune system usually takes care of these foreign entities entering your sinus and lungs. When you have a compromised immune system these small amounts of foreign bodies can get a foot hold and cause health issues. On those days when you can not see dust particulate in the air, you are still breathing in smaller amounts of the same little critters trying to do us all in.
     
  16. Randy Heinemann

    Randy Heinemann

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    The Tree Airshield Pro seems to take care of both the air filtration and face shield needs for turning (actually for other woodworking as well). I realize that some find this unit uncomfortable but I've worn it for a couple of hours straight before taking a break and really don't find it a problem. It's certainly more expensive than this Grizzly mask, but then I have always felt that cheap does not necessarily give the best results for air filtration. The goal is to keep dust from you lungs.
     
  17. Doug Freeman

    Doug Freeman

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    No actual filter rating negates it from my consideration. No organic vapor cartridge available - no good for finishing. Wonder how long 4AA batteries last?

    One of the more expensive areas for powered respirators, especially those approved for organic vapor, is the typically custom battery, and then the custom charger for it. Havent calculated how long AA batts would last.
     
  18. Rick Crawford

    Rick Crawford

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    When I got back into turning in 2007, I was a registered respiratory therapist, and I wanted the best protection that I could find and afford. I bought the Trend Airshield Pro based on my research of what was available at the time. I still use it everytime I create dust. The earmuffs don't fit well, and after many uses and recharges, the battery pack needs replacement...and not a cheap pack either. Of course, it's proprietory, so no substitutes available. I now also have a hanging air filtration system, and also a point source dust collector. You only get one pair of lungs as original equipment.
     
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  19. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I'm guessing that they don't sell refurbished lungs yet.
     
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  20. Russell Nugent

    Russell Nugent

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    You can get anything you want on amazon these days.
     
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  21. JeffSmith

    JeffSmith

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    Rick - I use the air shield pro, too. Lots of info on rebuilding the batteries and changing out the charger for better battery life - I rebuilt mine several years ago and they’re still going strong. Pretty simple if you can handle a soldering iron. A quick search of the forums should turn up many hits on old discussions.
     
  22. Tim Tucker

    Tim Tucker

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    I have owned the same respirator that the OP posted about, and hated it. I t protruded out too far to fit under a face shield and felt "front heavy, so I had to tighten it on my face to the point of...discomfort. Then I bought a Trend Airshield. Better - but top heavy, and caused me some problems with my neck. Could only wear it for about 2 hours per day. Not enough.... Then I bought the JSP Power Cap - and for the type of unit this is...it is the lightest, most comfortable unit. Because of how it is made - the perceived weight is only 1/2 of the Trend. External batteries. Comes with a good charger....the best of it's product type.

    But....if you are serious about "total protection"...and we all should be - ... eyes, face in general, AND lungs..... then a PAPR respirator such as a 3M 300, or better yet, 600 series ( the 600 can do VOC as well as HE particulate filtration. ). I am waiting on my new PAPR to arrive - hopefully today. It is a RPB Safety Z-Link Plus. Here is a link to the manufacturer's page: https://www.rpbsafety.com/respirators/z-link I chose this one because of the flexibility to serve for any purpose where face and lung protection is needed. Very light, modular, and you can add on a welding face shield, or others...and different filter cartridges are coming for almost any need. AND...it offered the highest total protection factor of any made.

    And, YES...it is expensive. But, so was my lathes. And so are all of my tools. But I can buy more of those. I can't buy more lungs. Or eyes. So, WHY do we look for "cheap" solutions to protect the most expensive components of wood turning....YOUR HEALTH....?:rolleyes::D
     
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