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Need some hints on a scorched surface.

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by 42Olds, Jun 15, 2020.

  1. 42Olds

    42Olds

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    Dec 13, 2005
    Messages:
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    I came across this image on Pinterest, and would love to duplicate the gnarled surface - which I assume is scorched. I've done a lot of scorched ash bowls, but have never gotten anything near this deep of a crackled look. I would appreciate any suggestions on what wood would give me this look, and if it is perhaps something other than scorched...
     

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  2. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    You could review a few YouTube videos on the Japanese technique called Shou Sugi Ban, which is used for various purposes.
     
  3. Richard Coers

    Richard Coers

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    My guess is that the red surface is some kind of solvent based or lacquer based paint that was set on fire while still wet. More to it than just scorched. Scorching will just produce a charcoal surface, not a uniform peeling look like that.
     
    charlie knighton likes this.
  4. Damon McLaughlin

    Damon McLaughlin

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    I can't speak for the surface cracking as I haven't done that (though it looks like a crackle paint base). For the underside of the bowl it appears torched/burnt. The way I achieve keep grain patterns when burning is first I burn the wood with a butane torch. Once its all charcoal like and won't burn any more I take a brass wire brush and scrub all the 'charcoal' away which leaves the harder grain. Then I burn again to get the next layer of soft wood between the grain. Then go at it with the wire brush again. I usually do this three or four times until I get a nice deep texture.
     
  5. Timothy Allen

    Timothy Allen

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    I agree that the crackled top surface sure looks like it is a finish layer that is crackled, not necessarily the wood itself.
     
  6. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    One technique for a crackled type finish is to apply a base layer of black milk paint and let dry, then a layer of hide glue, let it cure for a couple hours, and then apply red water based milk paint top coat. Any water based top coat might possibly work. The result might not be quite as dramatic as what you have shown.

    Another technique that I have seen is to use yellow wood glue instead of hide glue. While the glue is still slightly soft apply the top coat.
     
  7. Richard Coers

    Richard Coers

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