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Neck protection

Discussion in 'Woodturning Health & Safety' started by Mike Jennens, Sep 29, 2019.

  1. Mike Jennens

    Mike Jennens

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    What does everyone use for neck protection? I can envision a wild piece of wood getting below my face shield and embedding itself in my neck, so I'm going to add another piece of safety gear. Plus, it would be nice to have something to keep the shavings from going down my shirt. Neck protector or apron?
    Thanks!
     
  2. Gary Beasley

    Gary Beasley

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    Woodturning smocks generally have a high neck to keep the chips out. Dont know if thats enough protection though. You thinking of something like the shroud on a welding mask?
     
  3. Mike Jennens

    Mike Jennens

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    I guess I'm not 100% sure what would be best. I've had the errant piece fly off the lathe, so I want to be proactive. I'm thinking something leather or kevlar, but something comfortable.
    Thanks
     
  4. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    The face shield face I wear will protect my neck sufficiently.
     
  5. Russell Nugent

    Russell Nugent

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    My face shield covers my neck and usually rests just against my chest while turning.
     
  6. Mike Jennens

    Mike Jennens

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    What face shield do you guys use?
     
  7. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    I use a Uvex Bionic face shield and it covers my neck as well.
     
    Davis Stevenson likes this.
  8. Mike Jennens

    Mike Jennens

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    Thanks!
     
  9. GRJensen

    GRJensen

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    I use either a Uvex Bionic or Trend Airshield Pro ... I think either one affords sufficient protection.
     
    Mike Jennens likes this.
  10. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    You need to also be aware that your face shield may be giving you a false sense of security. It is designed to protect your face and eyes against things such as chips,pieces of bark, and other small chunks of wood, but provides insufficient protection against what you describe as a "wild piece of wood" that has enough energy to embed itself in your neck. Personal protective equipment (PPE) should be considered the last line of defense rather than the only protection. There are a number of things that you can do to greatly reduce the chance of injury:
    • Probably most important is to stay out of the zone of fire.
    • Make sure that the wood is being solidly held by a properly made tenon or mortise or a flat surface for a faceplate.
    • Make sure that the wood isn't punky where it needs to be strong,
    • Verify that the wood doesn't have cracks or other flaws that might cause it to come apart while spinning.
    • Listen to the wood ... it's talking to you. If there is a change in the sound stop immediately and look for the cause.
    • Life is too short to turn crappy wood ... don't make it even shorter by ignoring this advice.
    • Beginners are typically plagued by epic catches that are sometimes strong enough to knock the piece off the lathe. This usually says that something isn't being done right. This needs to be addressed ... otherwise the problem won't go away and could result in injury.
    • Hidden flaws are always a possibility, especially in "interesting" wood. This is why it is important to frequently stop and examine the wood. Listening for sound changes are also critically important.
     
  11. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Using the proper tool correctly usually minimizes the chance of large splinters coming off the wood piece. Once you master the proper use of the tools you can direct the wood chips in a direction away from your body.
     
    hockenbery and Mike Jennens like this.
  12. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Like @Mike Johnson said
    I recommend getting a quality class or spending some time with a mentor.

    a little learning greatly reduces the chance of any part of a blank coming off the lathe.
    Learn basic stances that keep you out of the line of Fire. Learn cutting technique, blank inspection, holding techniques

    Learning to turn with either hand forward is a valuable skill that helps you see the form better.
    It has the side benefit of easily shooting the chips so the don’t hit you.
     
    Gerald Lawrence and Mike Jennens like this.
  13. Jerry Bochenek

    Jerry Bochenek

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    As an added precaution I bought a lathe guard (Metal Cage) that is an optional accessory for my Jet lathe. It swivel's over the top and front part of the wood blank. When locked in place for use it is very strong and appears that it would protect against a chunk of wood flying off of the lathe. When not in use It swivels up and an out of the way, Or it can also easily be removed from the lathe when not in use. I don't use it very often so it is usually off of my lathe. I usually only use it during the initial rounding of a piece of suspect wood where I may see a minor crack or some punkiness. I don't hear much about the use of this item from other members on this forum. I did see a video by Mike Peace reviewing the use of this type of guard.
     
  14. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    The guard on Powermatic lathes has been discussed a few times on this and other woodturning forums, but I don't think that the subject has ever been discussed seriously. I think it has some design shortcomings that interfere with turning and that may be the reason that it isn't widely used. I'm sure that a more usable guard could be designed. The problem is that a comprehensive safety test program would be prohibitively expensive and there might not be a directly applicable safety standard that would serve as an overarching guide to create a test program. Add to that the cost of product liability insurance and nobody could afford it.
     
    Tim Tucker likes this.
  15. Jason Matisheck

    Jason Matisheck

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    There are various neck/throat protectors available for ice hockey, field hockey and lacrosse that you could look into. Search for goalie throat protector.
     
    Mike Jennens likes this.

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