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Laguna Revo 24/36 VS Grizzly GO800

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by John Hicks, Jan 31, 2020.

  1. John Hicks

    John Hicks

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    I am trying to decide on either one of these lathes. I'm not sure why the Grizzly costs more? Maybe a bit more cast iron? It appears the Grizzly may be a version of the older Lagunas, but I'm not sure. I'm a disabled Veteran with a very limited income and this is a "last lathe" purchase for me. I've dealt with Laguna since the Robland X31 days when the actual owners answered the phone and talked with you: Now their customer support people in California answer the phone with an instant attitude. Not to mention Kim Tippin on YouTube trying to get her revo lathe running without a wobble. I have an older Laguna 18/47 Platinum lathe that I bought a few months ago; but am quickly finding out is not built very well and the motor bogs down very easily.
    So, I'm stuck trying to decide.
    Sure I'd rather plop down a bunch more and get a Robust American Beauty. But the likelihood of the Disabled veterans disability doubling is a bit on the "miracle" level!
    Anything you guru's know would be helpful.

    https://lagunatools.com/classic/lathes/revo-24-36-220v/

    https://www.grizzly.com/products/Grizzly-24-x-48-Heavy-Duty-Wood-Lathe/G0800
     
  2. John Walls

    John Walls

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  3. Arkriver

    Arkriver

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    Powermatics seem to be the work horse of the lathe world. You rarely hear anything bad about them. Our club has one and it has served us well. I have a Grizzly bandsaw and based on it I would never recommend anything made by Grizzly. Some may have better luck than I have with them.
     
  4. Roger Chandler

    Roger Chandler

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    I looked seriously at the Laguna Revo 2436, and also the Grizzly G0800. What sold me on the G0800 was the build. It is really heavy duty. The Laguna 2436 has the nice tailstock pendant contol, and the Grizzly doesn't.

    The G0800 has a high efficiency advanced motor, and a more advanced inverter from Delta Electronics - the "EL" series, which is more efficient in energy transfer than the older "S" series inverter on the Laguna lathes. The build on the G0800 is very heavy cast alloy, and the Laguna has a steel bed. The Laguna 2436 Revo has 2 spindle bearings, and the Grizzly G0800 has 3 heavy duty spindle bearings all bigger than a baseball. The smallest being 80 mm, and the other 2 being 85mm diameter. A baseball is 74.68mm diameter. This means for heavy wood [which I turn frequently] the extra support of those large bearings is likely to produce less wear and tear on the bearings, and the frequency in which they may need to be replaced. If I understand correctly, both of the Laguna Revo bearings are smaller than the ones on the G0800.

    If you are not likely to turn really large items, then the Revo should do very well for you, but a steady diet of heavy wood might make you wish you had the heavier frame, bed, headstock and tailstock of the G0800. The revo does have some really nice features, and I looked seriously at it, but decided to go with the G0800. I am happy as a clam with my choice, even after two years of heavy usage. The G0800 still impresses me every time I turn a project because of its quality machining, solid lock down on a much heavier banjo and tailstock, and the high end performance. I have turned on numerous PM 3520b's, a Robust American Beauty which a friend has, and the monster Serious SL-2542, at nearly 1600 lbs. I almost purchased a Robust American Beauty at the time 2 years ago, a sweet machine for sure, but am really happy I got the G0800. There is nothing I could do on the AB, that I can't do on my G0800.

    I may yet purchase an American Beauty, just to have one, as I really like that lathe! But with the G0800, I do not feel like I've given up anything, and am actually impressed with the G0800, even after 2 years of heavy usage. I just turned a bowl this morning......man, that is one sweet and heavy duty beast of a lathe! Oh, the G0800 is manufactured by the Harvey Industries Machine Co. which also makes the Powermatics. The G0800 is most comparable to the Powermatic 4224b in class, but does have the ergonomic cone on the headstock and other features as well.

    Good luck on whatever lathe you choose.....my opinion is that you would do well with either the Revo 2436 or the G0800, but for me the heavy duty build was what sold me on the G0800. I also like the swing away tailstock, and the bed extension which I have and can turn up to 66 inches between centers or up to 38" diameter off the end with the extension in the lower position.

    I hope this info helps you, and would encourage you to find owners who may have either of the lathes and see if you could take a test drive and kick the tires......you will know for certain then!
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2020
    Thurman Mason likes this.
  5. John Hicks

    John Hicks

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    Anything made in china has the potential to have been passed by on any certain day. That is by the quality control inspector.
     
  6. Chris Fairbanks

    Chris Fairbanks Adminstrator Staff Member

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    I have had my G0800 for a few years now and love it. I have not turned much on it due to a change in jobs about the time I bought it so my shop time is limited but the times I do get to use it I love it. Coming from Jet 1442 was a slight shock
     
  7. Ed Weingarden

    Ed Weingarden

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    I used to own a Revo 24/36, before I sold it and bought the Grizzly G0800. Let me condense my months-long saga with the Revo to a few sentences. The original headstock started to make a scraping noise not long after delivery; headstock replaced by Laguna. Digital readout failed not long after getting the second headstock; another headstock sent by Laguna. Motor (or electronics) failed one day after receiving the headstock. At that point, I was rather frustrated with the experience. Customer service started out to be attentive, but that faded after awhile. And with each headstock replacement, I had to get the dysfunctional one out of my basement to be re-crated, and the new one down to the basement. After three replacement headstocks, and waning customer service, I decided that even if the latest headstock functioned properly, and for a good period of time, I would sell the machine and move on to the Grizzly. One of my woodturning club-mates has the Revo 18/36 and has had issues with the headstock as well.

    I've had the G0800 for not quite a year now. I haven't had one issue with it, and I'm very pleased with it's performance. With respect to pricing, you have to take into account that the Revo has a 36" bed, while the Grizzly is a 48" bed with tailstock swing-away. If you want the equivalent on the Revo, add $300. When Grizzly runs a 10% sale, the price points will be similar. Good luck with whichever you decide on.
     
  8. John Walls

    John Walls

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    I heard that the last week of April, Powermatic lathes would be on sale, 10% off? That's what I'm waiting to see, would bring the price close to 4k?
     
  9. Mark Jundanian

    Mark Jundanian

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    @John Walls , Powermatic will be 10% off at Woodcraft Feb 7 to 17.
     
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  10. John Hicks

    John Hicks

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    Thank you for your help everyone! The problems with the Laguna seem to be too consistent for me. I was also looking at the Powermatic, but in that price range, you lose 4 inches of swing.
     
    Chris Fairbanks likes this.
  11. John Hicks

    John Hicks

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    This is the older Laguna 24/36 Revo lathe. Look familiar? I'm wondering why they dropped this lathe?
    Capturelaguna1.JPG
     
  12. Daniel Warren

    Daniel Warren

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    I believe Laguna was using a design shared by Harvey at the time Much like Grizz is probably still doing.

    https://www.harveywoodworking.com/products/t-60-lathe

    Much of the equipment is manufactured in a shared facility. There are spec tolerance differences from one company to the next, again as I’ve heard.
     
  13. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    My lathe (Robust AB) has 25½" swing, but I've never turned anything over 18" in the eight years that I have owned it. Large pieces look impressive, but in reality very few people buy pieces that large. The Powermatic is capable of turning pieces larger than 20" diameter ... just slide the headstock to the end of the bed and then using an outboard tool rest you're good to go.
     
    Tim Tucker likes this.
  14. Daniel Warren

    Daniel Warren

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    I was hung up on swing when I was searching for a lathe. Wound up with an 18” capacity lathe. Turns out that’s more than plenty for what I usually do. I tried a few pieces that maxed the lathe out and it was fun, but as Bill mentioned pretty obscure to have a 20”-16” bowl. Unless you’re into big bowls and do it for fun or there’s a unique demand, 18-20” of swing is plenty.
     
  15. Mark Halleran

    Mark Halleran

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    $4321.30 with free shipping on a 3520C from Woodcraft. Called them to verify today.
     
  16. John Hicks

    John Hicks

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    That is a good price. Of course our sales tax is 10%, so I may wait till they have a sale. There is a lathe that is the same one Harvey sells, that through a Chinese distributor is 3,680 for the 24/48 that is the same as the G0800. Just not sure if I can trust them or not.
     
  17. Randy Heinemann

    Randy Heinemann

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    Oh . . . And that's not true in the US?
     
  18. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    John, considering you live in Wetter Washington, I'd suggest picking whichever lathe has the most stainless and the least iron. ;)

    BTW, one of the forum members just purchased one of the scratch and dent Powermatics from Equipment Sales and Service in Auburn. They become available from time to time, so you have to be patient and persistent, and also check them over very carefully. You could PM the poster in the Want to Buy section of the classifieds here for more info on his price and experience.
     
  19. John Hicks

    John Hicks

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    Name a list of US made lathes that had lots of qc problems.
     
  20. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    The first powermatic 3520s were US made and had lots of problems maybe more due to design than manufacture.
    One was the headstock locking plate cracked often. Sort of critical on a sliding head stock machine.
    Certainly a quality control issue if the plate can’t withstand the force of the locking lever.
     
  21. John Hicks

    John Hicks

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    I have decided not to include the Laguna in my search. Too many reports of problems with poor QC. Now it's between the G0800 and the Powermatic.
     
  22. Roger Chandler

    Roger Chandler

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    The G0800 is a lot more lathe than the PM 3520c. Both made by the same manufacturer. I’ve not seen the 3520c up close and personal, but have turned on many 3520b’s. The pendant on the 3520c is a nice feature, if that is important to you. The 3520c has a longer warranty. For the heavy build and the quality, if I had to make the choice between the 2 lathes today, I’d still choose the G0800. The 3520c had not come out quite yet when I got my G0800.

    I wanted my lathe to be able to handle anything I might want to throw at it, including some 38” turned table tops for some accent tables I plan to turn. Being able to turn off the end with the swing away tailstock and lower bed extension was important to me in my choice of a lathe. You may limit your turning to smaller things, so a 20” swing lathe may suit you well. I think you made a good call in crossing that brand off your list. I’ve read of a number of issues reported lately, and that concerns me.

    I’m not trying to talk you into the G0800 or sell you on it, but give you my honest experience with mine, so take it as just that. One thing that impressed me right out of the crate was the pure precision with which the G0800 is machined....as nice as any lathe I’ve ever seen, which is quite a few makes! Mine was in total alignment right out of the crate. The centers lined up to an exacting degree, the lockdown of the banjo, tailstock and headstock are solid as a rock.

    It has power and torque for coring, and my unit has had some heavy stuff on it, including half of a chestnut oak burl that weighed over 250 lbs when I put it on my lathe.....made a rather large hollow form from that burl. It handled that piece very well, which just confirmed to me all over again, I made a great choice for my turning interests.

    Your interests may vary a good bit from mine, so your choice may vary as well. Good luck in your quest!
     
  23. Tim Tucker

    Tim Tucker

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    Roger, I am confused. Can you clarify the following?

    "The G0800 is a lot more lathe than the PM 3520c."...." I’ve not seen the 3520c up close and personal".....
     
  24. Roger Chandler

    Roger Chandler

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    Yes Tim, the 3520c is a 20" swing lathe and the G0800 is a 24" swing lathe, heavier in build, etc. Don't misunderstand, so thanks for allowing me to clear up any misunderstanding. I am not saying the G0800 is better built than the 3520c, taking a dive into the schematics of the headstock [spindle bearing size, etc,] the bearings are smaller on the 3520c, so the G0800 is built heavier in the frame, banjo, headstock, tailstock, more horsepower motor, more so it will take a heavier load than the 3520c. The specs sheet on it does not list the actual inverter name, but most of Powermatics use the old "S" type Delta Electronics inverter, which is good, but the more advanced inverter on the G0800 is more efficient and allows greater energy transfer to the motor to the spindle for more torque at low speeds.
    Hope this helps. I do like the PM lathes........have turned on numerous units from them. :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2020
  25. Tim Tucker

    Tim Tucker

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    Oh.. O.K. - I understand thanks for explaining.
     
  26. Bill Szydlo

    Bill Szydlo

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    Have you seen the ads for the new Rikon 70-3040? It looks like it will be available in April and might be in the competitive mix with the Laguna/Grizzly/Powermatic.
     
    Rob Price likes this.
  27. Rob Price

    Rob Price

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    That’s a cool idea. I wonder how cumbersome it is to move the tool rest from the regular ways to the lower ways. That’s a lot of swing. It doesn’t weigh as much, 679lbs, I guess with the shorter bed overall, I wonder how it would swing a big blank compared to an 800+ lb lathe.

    Don’t forget, in the above comparison, the PM headstock can slide down and you can turn outboard to exceed the 20” swing for platters and stuff. I bought the extension kit for some long spindles a few years ago but I’ve never used the outboard capacity. I can barely sell a 18” platter/bowl, not a lot of market for those, but I do enjoy the bigger stuff just for the sake of the challenge of it. But you’re not locked into 20”. I haven’t measured the distance with the bed extension in the lower position, but I’m guessing at least 30” swing is possible. Currently I use the extension to get the tailstock out of the way since I don’t have the swing away- it wasn’t an option when I bought my 3520B.
     
  28. Roger Chandler

    Roger Chandler

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    The Rikon 70-3040 looks like an innovative and very impressive unit. Seems to take features of the Stubby’s and incorporates them into a unit capable of being very versatile. That is the first time I have seen a picture of it. I think we need to hear how well the motorized bed feature works, and if there are any issues when the bed is extended.
     
  29. John Hicks

    John Hicks

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    The Harvey T60-s is like the Grizzly G0800 but with a different motor and additional controls. Not sure if those things are worth a grand though?
     
  30. Roger Chandler

    Roger Chandler

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    The Harvey Turbo-60 has a 2 hp D/C motor with controller. The Grizzly 0800 has a 3 hp A/C motor with inverter. Besides the horsepower increase with the Grizz, the A/C motor inverter combo will produce more low end torque for large turnings and coring than the D/C motor/controller combo. That was an important consideration for me in my selection of the G0800, as I had an 18/47 lathe with a 2 hp D/C motor/controller combo on it. On lower end, the torque produced is greater with an A/C motor with inverter.
     
  31. Brad Winesett

    Brad Winesett

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    I own a Grizzly jointer, shaper, bandsaw, and wet grinder. They have been good machines. Grizzly's customer service is in the USA and is pretty good from my experience. The only problem is when you need a part. If you get lucky and it is in stock, it ships right away. If not in stock, be prepared to wait anywhere from 3-6 months. That is based on real experience. Waiting on a new leather wheel for my wet grinder that I ordered on January 13th, it is out of stock and won't arrive to Grizzly until April. About 10 years ago, it took 6 months to get a part for my shaper.

    I have a Powermatic 3520A, so I may not be impartial, but that would be my choice. It is a very popular machine for good reason, well proven. If it is a concern, re-sale will be much better with a Powermatic. You rarely see anyone hunting a used Grizzly lathe, but many people are usually on the hunt for a Powermatic.
     
  32. Tim Tucker

    Tim Tucker

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    THIS>>>>> "You rarely see anyone hunting a used Grizzly lathe, but many people are usually on the hunt for a Powermatic." I would watch for a used Powermatic 3520 B. They are tough and reliable. 2 HP is sufficient if you are using sharp tools and not being very aggressive. As well - the parts for the 3520B are available should you ever need.
     
  33. John Walls

    John Walls

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    Figures... darn it, I won't be ready to purchase til end of April, but on Amazon right now,
    Powermatic 1353001 2 hp 220V 1PH 3520C Lathe with Risers, has a list of $3,824.99 with FREE Scheduled Delivery
    Hope it goes for this price again sometime this summer.
     
  34. Tim Tucker

    Tim Tucker

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    Wow! That is a GREAT price! - I sold my used 3520B for $3500
     
  35. John Walls

    John Walls

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  36. Bill Szydlo

    Bill Szydlo

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    That's the best price I've seen on the 3520C. Possibly they are going to bring the price down closer to the competition since the Laguna 2436 is $3800 and I understand the new Rikon 70-3040 will be $3800. Both of these have 3hp motors so it will be interesting to see if the 3520C stays at the lower price. Also, I understand the new Rikon will be available in May.
     
  37. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Race to the lowest common denominator usually ends up poorly for the buyer and seller in the long run.
    The bottom turns into no parts, no service, no quality, no future, the vultures swoop in, buy the company, raise the prices and the cycle starts over again.
     
  38. John Hicks

    John Hicks

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    I got a good price from Harvey for the T60-s lathe. It has a couple things I like above the Grizzly. Second set of controls, and the commercial duty motor; though it is a smaller motor, it has some grunt.

    Capture.JPG
     
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  39. Roger Chandler

    Roger Chandler

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    Congrats on your new T-60. That is a nice lathe for sure.
     
  40. William Rogers

    William Rogers

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    Congrats John. You will enjoy that lathe.
     

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