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Keeping the chuck key in sight!

Discussion in 'Woodturning Health & Safety' started by John Torchick, May 6, 2020.

  1. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    A while back, I was getting ready to drill a piece on the lathe. Reaching for the switch, I noticed the key was still in the Jacobs chuck in the headstock. The key is black with Delta blue plastic coating- hard to notice. I realized even at the low speed, it could result in a nasty injury. My wife donated a piece of yellow ribbon, tied it to the key and stuck it on the lathe with a magnetic hook from Harbor Freight. Photo shows the location where it can't be missed.
    IMG_6655.JPG
     
  2. Mark Wollschlager

    Mark Wollschlager

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    Keyless chucks are nice to have too. I rarely need to crank down on a drill bit, so they work well for me.
     
    Gerald Lawrence likes this.
  3. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    I use my drill chuck in the tail-stock which eliminates any issues of the key being in the chuck or not. A stationary drill bit is safer to work around while having the work piece turn in the headstock.
     
  4. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Can't remember what the situation was for the chuck in the HS but I learn quick!
     
  5. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    I was in the shop and my thread kept going through my mind with your post. If I recall, difficult at my age, I was shaping a fishing rod grip. The Jacobs chuck goes in the HS. The mandrel goes into the chuck and one end is inletted to 60 degrees to go on the live center. I believe that is why the key was at the HS. Drilling as you say with the JC in the TS.
     
  6. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Whenever I watch a video with a turner using a drill chuck in the headstock and holding the work piece in their hand drilling a hole, I see the potential slip of the hand as the work piece skips off the tip of the drill bit and the hand gets shoved onto the turning drill bit.
     
  7. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    I agree, Mike. Plus, the chuck will drift out unless you have a whatchamacallit in the HS.
     
  8. Don Wattenhofer

    Don Wattenhofer

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    The Jacobs chuck should never be used in the HS without a drawbar. The #2 Morse taper chuck arbor will typically have a 3/8-16 female thread so a drawbar can be made from all thread, but if the arbor dose not have the thread don't use it in the HS.
     
  9. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Refer to post #5 clarifying this thread. I wouldn't use the JC without something in the tailstock to hold it in place. My JC doesn't have threads for a drawbar. Wish it did, though. I put piece of bronze tubing in the JC in the headstock and the 60 degree live center in the TS to turn grips.
     
  10. Don Wattenhofer

    Don Wattenhofer

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    OK that would be an exception but I believe some one had mentioned drilling with the JC in the HS, but now that I think about it why would anybody want to do that.
     
  11. Robert D Evans

    Robert D Evans

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    There may be a situation where you want to use the Jacobs Chuck to hold something small in the headstock. For example, if you wanted to put a point on a short wooden dowel. I wouldn't want to use it without a draw bar. A Jacobs chuck coming out at 1500 rpm is gonna dent something.
     
  12. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    If I needed a point on a wooden dowel, I would use the old-fashioned pencil sharpener. My JC doesn't have threads for a drawbar.
     
  13. Don Wattenhofer

    Don Wattenhofer

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    If you want to hold small round dowels or such it is better to invest in a collet chuck. I have a cheap collet chuck that goes from 1/8th" to 5/8" by 8ths and it mounts with a 2 Morse taper that has the 3/8'-16 female thread. The type that screw onto the HS spindle are probably a better choice and I think they use industry standard ER collets so it would be possible to purchase additional in between sizes.
     
  14. Robert D Evans

    Robert D Evans

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    Absolutely a collet chuck would be better. I don't have any collet chucks so if I need to turn something small, I either make a jam chuck or use the keyless Jacobs chuck with a draw bar. I wouldn't trust the Jacobs chuck to turn anything over a few inches in length. It's only holding by 3 points of contact. I don't do a lot of small turnings so I haven't invested in collet chucks yet. Most of my focus lately has been learning segmented turning.
     
  15. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Hard to beat a collect chuck.. I have the collet jaw set for my strong hold - the come in handy for some jobs.

    You can make a wooden collet substitute accurate enough for most woodturning applications.
    Turn a disc with a tenon on it to fit your 4 jaw chuck.
    Put it in the chuck and drill a hole the size of what you want to grip.
    Take it out of the chuck and cut to the center with a bandsaw.
    Align the kerf between two jaws when the chuck is closed the kerf will close making the hole clamp.
     
    Bill Boehme likes this.
  16. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    I have seen this on YT and it's a great idea. Got some projects in mind that could use this idea.
     

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