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Is it worth that much money?

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by John Hicks, Jun 25, 2020.

  1. John Hicks

    John Hicks

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2020
    Messages:
    149
    Location:
    Hoodsport, Washington
    the mystery of metallurgy
     
  2. R Henrickson

    R Henrickson

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    151
    Location:
    Kentucky
    That's how it's been done for centuries across North Africa and into the Near East. Spindle turning with a bow lathe. Wood has always been expensive there, so most turnings were done from small pieces. Wood was too valuable for things like bowls or plates --- pottery was much cheaper to produce, whatever the size of the item. Yet the woodturners guild was one of the largest in Ottoman Cairo, and spindlework turned from wood was ubiquitous in vast numbers of houses and other structures -- furniture, window screens, dividers, balusters, etc etc. Some was incredibly complex. Window screens often had 100-200 pieces *per square foot*, and typical window lattices were 10-20 square feet (so 1000-4000 pieces for a single window).
     
    Lamar Wright likes this.
  3. John Torchick

    John Torchick

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Messages:
    2,592
    Location:
    Southeast Tennessee
    Just think- that is how it was done in the past. Saw a photo of an Egyptian chair that had beads and coves on the legs and spindles.
     
  4. David Shombert

    David Shombert

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2020
    Messages:
    41
    Location:
    Harrisonburg, VA
    I'm a little late to this discussion, and others have already expressed the same take that I have on this, but I'll just add my $0.02 - I always choose Doug Thompson's tools first. Idon't see much difference among any of the higher quality tools, steel-wise, but Doug is a great guy, an individual (not a big corporation), and has done a lot for the woodturning community. He's been helpful to me on more than one occasion. I just plain like the guy so I give him my business whenever I can.
     

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