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Hose clamp chuck for round objects

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Dave Fritz, Dec 29, 2020.

  1. Dave Fritz

    Dave Fritz

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    I want to drill a straight hole through a ball. I've seen a home made chuck that has slits cut in the end and a band clamp is placed around it and tightens around the ball but I can't find the video or plans for making such a thing. Can anyone help please?
     
  2. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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  3. Dave Delo

    Dave Delo

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    Haven't been on his site lately but have you seen David Reed Smith's site. He shows plans for a number of homemade jigs & fixtures.
     
  4. Don Wattenhofer

    Don Wattenhofer

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    DSC00782.JPG
    This is one of several that I have made over the years. I didn't have a plan I just turned a piece of wood made the inside contour to fit the piece I wanted to hold then made the cuts and added a hose clamp. The biggest problem with this type chuck is that the hose clamp does not pull the fingers tight evenly so the piece you are holding ends up slightly off center.
     
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  5. Dennis Weiner

    Dennis Weiner

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    I have turned many custom jaws using the Oneway strong hold flat jaws. Instead of the hose clamps, you may try hollowing a set of cove-like jaws near the diameter of the spheres you are holding. I have not tried this but it appears that it may be a worthwhile alternative.
     
  6. Dennis Weiner

    Dennis Weiner

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    Don, to offset the pulling of the hose clamp (absence of continuous pressure due to the screw) you can try two hose clamps with the locking mechanism 180 degrees of each other. You would alternately tighten each one to get even spacing between the slots thus getting your piece closer to center. What do you think?
     
  7. Tom De Winter

    Tom De Winter

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    I would turn a cove in the first 3/4” of the slots so that it took less force from the hose clamp to tighten against the part.
     
  8. Mark Jundanian

    Mark Jundanian

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    I was thinking about some wax on the outside of the chuck and on the inside of the hose clamp.
     
  9. Kevin Jenness

    Kevin Jenness

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    A Straka chuck will work for this and will accommodate a range of sizes. You can find instructions for making one in @hockenbery recent "Ball in a Ball" thread on the tutorials forum.
     
  10. Don Wattenhofer

    Don Wattenhofer

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  11. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    You have some good suggestions for making slotted jam style Chuck.

    whenever possible I drill holes before the turning. Pretty easy to line up a block with a hole drilled though or partway and then turn a sphere with a hole already in it that goes through or toward the center.

    another easy solution is a vacuum Chuck if you have one

    also a straka Chuck or donut Chuck will do well if you can center the ball or if it is not a through hole.
    I use one for hollowing the big ball to do a ballin a ball.
     
  12. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    I did drill some on the drill press, and 100% accuracy was not critical. I drilled a recess in a waste block with a forstner bit, maybe 1 1/4 inch diameter, and then without moving anything, changed bits to drill through the sphere. It was pretty close.

    robo hippy
     
  13. Don Wattenhofer

    Don Wattenhofer

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    That would undoubtedly be an improvement if you connected two smaller clamps together, but that would leave two quadrants questionable.
    I will not be making or using any of this type again since I have started going the scroll chuck route.
     
  14. Don Wattenhofer

    Don Wattenhofer

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    Excuse me but I don't understand what a "slotted jamb style chuck" is.
     
  15. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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    It's the "style" of chuck we are talking about... I call it a finger chuck, same thing, different name... I believe the "You" Al was referring to was the OP
    finger chuck.jpg
     
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  16. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Below is a nice looking Jam Chuck with slots cut in it to let It open and close. And a hose clamp to keep it closed.

    When I took a class with Christian Burchard we cut patterns on spheres and hollowed them using Jam chucks.
    Those were cylinders hollowed to hold the balls. No slots the balls were a tight fit and pushed or tapped in.
    After hollowing the balls usually came out when the side of the Chuck was hit with a tool handle.
    sometimes the chucks had to be split with a chisel to free the hollowed sphere

    upload_2020-12-31_15-47-32.jpeg
     
  17. Don Wattenhofer

    Don Wattenhofer

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    Yup a jam chuck is something that you have to "jam" the work piece into where as a collet chuck can be opened and closed to grip or release the work piece. Question would you call the collet chucks being sold which use multiple sizes of steel spring collets a slotted jam chuck?
     
  18. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    No because a collet chucks close by being compressed into a taper.

    When a wooden chuck is turned just like a jam chuck and would work as such and then modified,
    I think slotted jam is as good a name as finger Chuck. They do hold similarly to a collet Chuck so that is a reasonable name too although they close differently.

    just another example of the lack of standard definitions in woodturning.
     
  19. Don Wattenhofer

    Don Wattenhofer

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    Yes because a collet needs to close uniformly whether it be a taper or scroll !@#$%^ so there
     
  20. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I don’t understand. I assume you are joking and I’m missing the joke.

    The way your post comes across to me is that you are now saying a machined collet should be called a jam Chuck based on the question you asked.


    Really doesn’t matter what you call a home made Chuck as long as it holds good enough to do the job.
     
  21. Dave Fritz

    Dave Fritz

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    I have a question for Al. I thought about sending an email but then I thought, there may be others that have a similar problem to the one I'm having with a Straka chuck. I downloaded your plans and followed them. When turning them round on the lathe I held them together with short bolts, marked both parts as top and bottom and drew a registration mark across both. The problem came when I replaced the short bolts with the carriage bolts. For some reason the registration mark isn't lined up exactly anymore and it's really hard to adjust the outer ring as there's a lot of binding with the bolts. I was wondering about opening the holes on the bottom plate a little bit and tighten everything in place making sure the registration line is where it should be. Interested in your thoughts about where I may have gone wrong and what the fix might be. I'm drilling a hole through a 1.5 inch ball and will be doing at least a dozen so I'd rather not take so long to put one in and take it out.
     
  22. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    My answer may be disappointing.- thought of a couple of things. Maybe some one else has a thought.
    not sure what is wrong.

    If it fits and lines up with the short bolts then I think it has to line up with the long bolts.
    I’m sure you watched the alignment of the outside faces- they face outward and then they face inward.

    I have done 20 - 30 this way for workshop sets and have given several away.
    They all lined up with the long bolts. And most have been field tested by students.


    One thing that I thought of is if the holes are not drilled square it could cause a “twist” with the long bolts.
    Check the long bolts for square with the top plate.

    I do struggle sometimes with the bolts not sliding easily through the bottom plate when opening and closing it.
    there is a stiffness in the beginning and I may have to tap the bolts some with a tool handle. This may be from the MDF absorbing moisture or the drill leaving a fuzzy hole. The threads on the bolts will clean the hole with a tap.

    You could drill the base plate holes a 1/16 larger - you have a washer on that end.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2021
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  23. Dave Fritz

    Dave Fritz

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    Not being square holes could definitely be the problem. My drill press appears to be square but when I drill a ball on that the hole is off center, that's why I made the chuck. I wonder why you use four bolts and not three? I think Alon Lacer uses 3 in his. Wouldn't three be easier to register sort of like a three legged stool compared to a four legged stool?
     
  24. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    .

    I just felt more comfortable with 4 bolts. With most balls I don’t have to remove a bolt to get the balls in and out.
    Also I get the top plate perpendicular top the bed and tighten all the nuts the same (torqued to the same finger pressure). So registration isn’t an issue.

    three bolts are a big advantage for bowls. With 3 bolts you can get bowls in and out with removing 1 bolt or maybe none. With 4 bolts you have to take 1 and probably 2 bolts out to get bowls in and out.

    Probably a small advantage for registering with 3. The three bolts would register better with the top plate at an angle if there were a need for that.
     
  25. RichColvin

    RichColvin

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    Woodturning Wizardry by David Springett is a really good reference for this type of work holding. Your club’s library probably has a copy.
     
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  26. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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  27. Dave Fritz

    Dave Fritz

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    mea cupla: I had the front disk on the wrong way as you mentioned Al. Thanks, perfect alignment and runs true. Thanks for everyone's help.
     
  28. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I would never ever do that:):):):):)
    If you believe that I have a bridge you may be interested in.
     
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