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hollowing tools for a newbi

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by Art Scott, Nov 14, 2009.

  1. Art Scott

    Art Scott

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    2
    I have a Powermatic 3520 B (20 inch throw). After blowing up some larger bowls, I decided to start smaller to get use to the tools. That way, if I destroy my project, I won't have a lot of time invested.

    I am doing small bowls, boxes, fridge magnets, wine bottle stoppers and a gazallion finger tops trying to get one to consistently spin longer than 60 seconds.

    I can now avoid catches, for the most part.

    I am ready to try hollowing some smaller forms.

    Since I am going small, initially, would the Sorby Mini Hollowing tools be a good start?

    I also looked at the termite, seems to be a little different approach.

    Thanks for any advice, or short commings the various tool might have, you would like to share.

    Art
     
  2. Malcolm Smith

    Malcolm Smith

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    Blowing up some larger bowls! I would suggest getting some help at a group and at least get some videos of some of the better turners. You'll save yourself a lot of time and trouble.

    There's also a safety issue. One can get hurt by wood flying off the lathe. Most turners are very generous with their time and will want to help you. They've been where you are.

    Malcolm Smith.
     
  3. Dave Moore

    Dave Moore

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    Crystal River Valley - Colorado
    If you can find an experienced turner to spend an hour or so with you, so much the better, and the videos on sale are helpful also.
    But there's nothing wrong with being self taught either, and working these things out for yourself. It just takes longer is all and you will make more flying objects.
    Whichever you do, please do wear full face protection at all times . No joke. Always. I had a chunk from an unseen defect bounce off my mask just yesterday. Without the mask it would have been right in the teeth. It always happens too fast to duck.

    As for hollowing tools, I'd suggest keeping it simple. The Kelton hollowers are relatively inexpensive, and will require that you hollow freehand, which in turn will enhance your "feel" for what's going on. Plus, they come unhandled, so you get the additional practice of making a handle for them.
    Win win.
    The smaller sets of Keltons are quite nimble and you will be able to work comfortably (soon enough) on a small scale with them.

    Good luck.
     
  4. Rick Taylor

    Rick Taylor

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    Location (City & State):
    Kimmswick MO
    Good advice on getting some help from experienced turners or books/dvds at a minimum. All will help lessen the learning curve and allow you to learn correct techniques at the beginning rather than having to unlearn the wrong ways while you adjust to turning correctly/safely later.

    I have, and sometimes use, the termite. I would not advise new turners to start hollowing with this tool. It has limitations and I would say a definite learning curve. I am not sure about the mini hollowing tools either. You can hollow small hollow forms with the midi and standard hollowing tools but it is hard if not imposible to hollow larger hollow forms with the mini tools. Why not purchase tools that will get you more in the long run. I would also advise making your own using cutters standard in the metal working industry.

    Rick
     
  5. john lucas

    john lucas AAW Forum Expert

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    I like the John Jordan tools. They are simple with easily replaceable cutters. There very easy to sharpen. They work well and come in a large and small size.
    http://www.stubbylathe.com/
     
  6. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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    May 16, 2005
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    3,540
    Not into pottery, personally, but a lot of people love it. This is dated information, but it covers several of the basics. You can have scrapes, cuts, or limited cut types. http://www.morewoodturning.net/lyn.html
     
  7. Rick Taylor

    Rick Taylor

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    Michael,
    Great link to information collected by Lyn. I know Lyn was having serious health issues. Anyone hear from Lyn or know how he is doing?
    Rick
     
  8. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    And they can be used handled or in a captive setup.
     
  9. Art Scott

    Art Scott

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
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    And they can be used handled or in a captive setup.
    __________________
    Steve Worcester
    AAW Forum Administrato

    Steve, what is a captive setup?

    An aside to all who responded. I do wear a face shield everytime I turn on my lathe. It is a Uvex. I was told that I could see clearer if I used Son-of-a-Gun plastic conditioner from an auto parts store. It is amazing. There have been times that I've reached to flip my shield down to find it already was. This never happened before I used the conditioner.

    As to blowing up bowls, I sorta over stated the situation. I was trying to get the bowls real thin and perforated.......several different bowls. Guess I'm just a slow learner. Yea, yea I know. Functional bowls need to be thick, not see through.

    I've had the lathe since March and am really enjoying it.

    Thanks for all the advice.

    Art
     
  10. rsser

    rsser

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    Location (City & State):
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    You might look at tools that have a capped cutter, like the Mini Munro hollower or the Mini Proforme. Both are articulated for undercutting.
     
  11. Joe Greiner

    Joe Greiner

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    Captive setup

    Can't go very deep, especially free-hand, but a bowl gouge can cut nicely on end grain in a slicing cut, I've found. Experiment continues.

    A captive setup restrains the tool against vertical movement, with either a wide gate a la Jamieson, or an elbow rig - several versions around. Google is your friend.
     
  12. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    Captive setup would be like a Jamieson rig as he shows here under boring bars
    https://www.lylejamieson.com/tools/tool.asp

    It uses a setup to resist axial torque in a holder so the bar stays in a horizontal plane.
     

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