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Hollow out Long Cylinder

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Joe Schofield, Feb 16, 2021.

  1. Joe Schofield

    Joe Schofield

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2009
    Messages:
    6
    As I get back into turning, I've had another "I can do that" moment the other day, but I have found that part of it may be a little tricky.

    I was looking on Facebook the other day (ugh) and saw an advertisement for dugout mugs. If you've never seen them look it up they're pretty nice (but the price is not ;)). Of course, as I'm sure all of you have before (and probably will when you see these) say "I can do that".

    I'm pretty much mostly interested in the fun of making one (for the record I have no interest in some sort of money making enterprise here). I couldn't do anything too fancy with it but it would be a fun project - especially the bat shaped one.

    Anyway, I would be interested in hearing if anyone has hollowed out a longer cylinder like that without special hollowing tools. My biggest concern is of course supporting the piece while hollowing.

    Thoughts?

    Thanks
     
  2. Mark Jundanian

    Mark Jundanian

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    My first thought would be to use a Forstner bit.
     
  3. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member Beta Tester

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    This is the kind of project you can make a couple by struggling with inadequate tools.

    The 12 0z mugs are 3x3x10. Probably hollowed 9.5” deep.
    Holding in a good 4 jaw Chuck will work - I would use ONEWAY jaws. Dove jaws a good 2nd choice. If you can avoid a steady rest by no being overly aggressive and finishing the side wall in 2” increments.

    A 2.5” Forster bit would work. You will need an extension. This may be the best solution.
    Need to either pull bit out every 1/2-3/4” of depth to clear the shavings or clear the shavings with compressed air while drilling.

    i you have termite this is a little beyond it’s limit but would work for a couple.
    drill 1/2” pilot hole to depth. Cut from center to side wall. Pull the tool,toward the rime every couple,of cuts to smooth the side wall. This will give about the same surface as the first Forster bit. Probably faster.

    This could be done with a straight hollowing tool. 3/4” diamet
    Drill a pilot hole to depth with a 3/8 or 1/2 bit.
    The hollowing tool cuts from center to the side then finish cuts in 2” increments from rim to the bottom. You would want o finish the surface with a scraper bit and sanding.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2021
  4. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member Beta Tester

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    Ps you can sandblast the logos using a resist - my first choice
    Airbrush the logos - I would use this with the sandblasting
    Carve the logos
    Use pyrography to carve the logos.
    Use stippling to outline the logos
    Hand paint or ink the logos
     
  5. Randy Anderson

    Randy Anderson

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    Forstner bit with extensions an easy way to go here. I've found that it's worth the few extra $ to get a good forstner bit. I make coffee mugs and use a 2 1/4" bit into end grain. After sharpening some cheap ones more than a few times I invested in specific sizes of better quality wave edge bits and it's a huge difference. With that deep of a hole and extensions, that do flex, it would be easy to get a fair amount of hole wobble as you get deeper. If outside done prior to drilling then don't see a need for support to drill the hole.
     
  6. Joe Schofield

    Joe Schofield

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2009
    Messages:
    6
    I did end up getting a cheap piece of 4x4 pine to play with and made something but when I started hollowing it immediately started chattering because its a 12 inch piece being held at one end. Any problems doing that? I guess as long as you use a forstner bit its technically being held at both ends....

    So I stopped hollowing it and I either have a decorative bat or a incredibly soft useless mallet made of pine!

    But all in all it was good skew practice for me.
     

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