• We just finished a major forum upgrade. Please check out the "Whats New and Help" Thread at https://aawforum.org/community/index.php?threads/forum-upgrade-whats-new-and-help-march-2021.17436/ If you are having problems using the forums, please clear your browser cache and that should clear up any issues. Otherwise post in the Help Thread or email us at forum_moderator@aawforum.org. Hope you enjoy the refreshed site!
  • 3/30/21 - We finished what was hopefully the last part of the forum upgrade we started earlier this month, the rebuilding of all of the permissions. In our testing everything seems to be working correctly but if you have any problems please post in the "Forum Technical Support" forum and we will take a look at it. You will also see a few changes with the main forum index. We have moved the AAW Member Forums to their own group and the Marketplace Forums to their own group. This simplified the permissions configuration for the forums and hopefully it will make the forums a little easier to naviagate. Thanks!
  • Gallery Images: Title and Description Required

    Please read the new sticky announcement HERE for full details.

  • Welcome new registering member. Your username must be your real First and Last name (for example: John Doe). "Screen names" and "handles" are not allowed and your registration will be deleted if you don't use your real name. Also, do not use all caps nor all lower case.

Gouge suggestions

Joined
Apr 20, 2006
Messages
568
Likes
263
Location
Erie, PA
Something else? If I were to buy a M42 tool I would buy it from D-Way. A great article for the American Woodturner would be to ask the sellers of M42 tools how they got their start.
 
Joined
Feb 7, 2020
Messages
9
Likes
2
Location
Sykesville, Maryland
I'd like to hear why too. I have several Thompson tools and 3 Carter & Sons. The carters are M42 steel: 1-1/4" spindle roughing gouge, 1 1/4 skew, and a 1/8" tapered parting tool, all have Carter handles. All 3 are excellent tools. The SRG is especially nice with a big heavy round tang. The handles are shaped to fit your hand nicely, but are a bit cold. As far as I can tell, there are no short cuts taken on quality. Beautiful machinings.

I do prefer the toolless Jimmy Clewes cam releases where you make your own handles. Rather than have a handle/socket. length for every size tool, I use the biggest sockets and buy adapters for the smaller tools. This way you have less handles. So far the adapters have not gotten in the way of sharpening. Not sure if they will as the tool gets shorter. I currently have a medium and long handle variety, but want to add a short handle version to the stable. Also, while the cams work on flat tangs, they do inadvertently loosen more quickly on them. Lock is solid on round tangs, though. Wooden handles feel the best to me.
I guess we'll never know why not C&S..... You know, I'm OK with poo-pooing a brand/supplier as long as a reason is given for it. But to put a business down without giving a reason..... I think you should just say nothing. It's not fair to anyone.
 
Joined
Aug 6, 2009
Messages
367
Likes
129
Location
Lummi Island, WA
I was fortunate enough when starting to turn seriously to find myself in a club where Dave S of D-Way Tools was a member and mentor. I learned to turn on D-Way tools and have way more than a reasonable nuer of them. They are my gold standard for taking an edge and staying sharp. That said, the gouge made by Thompson for Lyle Jamieson is a jewel, I've got a couple - the parabolic flute is a joy. Can't really see a lot of difference in the metal - both are superior. I have three Robust gouges and have not yet decided on where they fit in my arsenal. I love the flat ground on top - makes it easy to sharpen right up to the nub or use the longer stickout on Ron Brown's 40/40 setup, but trying to judge the edge life compared to my standard. I have only played with one of Hunter's tools - the Osprey - and find it great for box bottoms and sides. I also have a hunter cutter for my hollowing rig.

As Bill mentioned, all of these companies are headed up by men who built them basically from scratch, who love turning and create exceptional tools to excel in this endeavor. In my opinion Carter tools offer nothing of any difference - they are simply derivative.

As for handles, The Robust handle with the collet is really nice and feels good in the hand. The D-way aluminum handles with vinyl (I think) cover are also very 'hand friendly' and I have more than a few. What I like most is making handles using the Hoseluk adapters - I get just what I want with full interchangability.
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2017
Messages
110
Likes
34
Location
Roscoe, Illinois
I love the Crown Pro-PM Ellsworth gouge made with "powdered metallurgy". Not being knowledgeable about those things, I'm not exactly sure what that is, but it does seem to stay sharper longer than other steel tools. Anyway they are great and I can get a razor sharp edge, even though I don't consider myself an expert at sharpening. They are a little expensive though. I bought mine from Craft Supplies USA, but I would guess they are available other places also.
 

brian horais

Beta Tester
Beta Tester
Joined
Dec 20, 2014
Messages
142
Likes
952
Location
Knoxville, TN
Website
www.horais.com
Ok so I currently use handled tools however I am debating buying unhandled tools and using a Clews or Robust system to hold the tools. Demonstrator came to my shop a couple months ago and I liked the idea of having several sharp gouges and only having to change a handle.

What is the favorite unhandled tool supplier? D way, sorby etc. Open to suggestions.

Thanks
Mark
I have a roughing gouge made by Carter and Sons and it is very well built with an all aluminum handle that is solidly made and well balanced. I also have an Ellsworth gouge that is a terrific tool and one of my favorites. Bottom line, get quality tools with good handles or get the quality tools like Thompson makes with interchangeable solidly built handles. Either way I think you will be satisfied
 
Top