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Drill Bits. What to Use?

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by Chris Edwards, Nov 2, 2020.

  1. Chris Edwards

    Chris Edwards

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2020
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    Location (City & State):
    Lebanon, TN
    If I want to get some spindle type practice making some tool handles, what is the best type of drill bit to use in the tail stock for drilling a 5/8" hole? I have a project plan for a hole this size.

    I have a forester bit in that size, but if a Brad Point is better, I need to order one.

    Thanks
     
  2. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

    Joined:
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    Location (City & State):
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    When I can I drill the hole first on a drill press. Then center the hole with a cone center.
    If using the drill press the Forster will work well.

    When I drill tool handles on the lathe.
    I turn the handle between centers with the butt of the handle driven by a spur bit.
    To drill the hole. I put a bradpoint bit in a Jacob’s Chuck in the head stock.
    Put the spur in the tailstock and use it to push the handle on to the drill bit using the tailstock handwheel.
    Mark where the spur was before turning it around. I rest my hand or wrist on the tool rest and hold the handle on center as l begin to drill.
    Easier to control a 18-24” handle this way.
     
    Dwight R Rutherford likes this.
  3. Chris Edwards

    Chris Edwards

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    Location (City & State):
    Lebanon, TN
    Thankyou, I never thought about doing it that way on the lathe, that was very helpful.

    I tried it using a spur drive in the headstock and a Jacobs chuck with a forester bit in the tailstock, but it got to the point where the friction of the Forster bit overcame the grab of the spur drive even though I was clearing out the drill shavings.

    I will try your method tomorrow, thanks again.
     
  4. Tim Connell

    Tim Connell

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    Jan 22, 2018
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    Location (City & State):
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    Maybe too late for what you have turned, but I have made a small tenon and held the handle in a chuck while drilling with forstner bit mounted in tailstock. Probably less accurate than Al's method, but good enough, especially if you will epoxy the tool in the handle.
     
  5. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    Location (City & State):
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    Hmm, can't remember.... I think I use a tenon on the butt end of the handle, then drill from the tailstock, then use a cone center in the hole so it stays centered on the handle. I do prefer the brad point bits. The forstner bits tend to wander. That some times can be a good thing because if tolerances are tight, then you get a very tight fit because of the wandering. I have never epoxied a handle into a handle.

    robo hippy
     
  6. Chris Edwards

    Chris Edwards

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2020
    Messages:
    85
    Location (City & State):
    Lebanon, TN
    Found a 5/8" Brad Point bit, in my drawer of misc. bits, so I tried the Hockenberry method, as described above, and it worked great.

    Drilled two 4"deep holes, without any issues, one in hard Maple the other in Zebrawood.

    Thanks.
     
    hockenbery likes this.

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