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DIY - Lathe Stand w/built-in dust collection...suggestions

Discussion in 'Woodturning Health & Safety' started by Michael Ascenzi, May 24, 2020.

  1. Michael Ascenzi

    Michael Ascenzi

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2020
    Messages:
    15
    Location (City & State):
    Beverly, Massachusetts
    So I'm currently in the process of building a stand for my lathe. Its part of the clean up and organization efforts I'm making to my basement in order to better utilize the space. Right now, there's just to little space and needs to be better organized. So I'm doing a flip top stand for my Miter Saw and Planer. Its about 90% of the Fischers Flip Top stand. Well that's the current stand I'm building.

    The very next stand I'm building is going to be my lathe stand. I'm in the process of designing the stand. I've done a rough pass at an initial design. I sort of like it, but there needs to be tweaks and I actually need to take into account dimensions on the next build.

    Full Stand.PNG

    I wanted to get some input. Here is the breakdown of my thinking.

    The stand width is going to accommodate the Laguna Revo 1216 plus the 20" extension. Figured I would add the width so that at some point I might find the need to add the extension. But I'll probably also use this extra space for the grinder, when I eventually get one. I'll throw the extension in the bottom left space. The cabinet will house the grinder/grinder jigs when it needs to be in storage.

    With the exception of the table top, I didn't want any flat services, which is why the back is angled from the top. The upward angle in the back is for directing the air flow. From the 2nd photo there will be two air ducts that will be connected to my dust collector. Planning on having the ability to cover up the right vs left duct, so I can have just one or both uncovered.

    dustCollection.PNG

    I know it would be better the closer the duct is to the actual piece I'm turning. But the ability to brush the turned pieces directly into the dust chute, as well as some air collection I think is a good direction. I also have an air filtration that will be set up fairly close by. about a couple feet away.

    The dust collection is the new Rockler 1250cfm with a Super dust deputy.

    What are peoples thoughts?
     
  2. Robert D Evans

    Robert D Evans

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    Jan 31, 2020
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    Location (City & State):
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    I think the wall space behind the lathe would be better utilized for tool shelving and tool racks as opposed to dedicated to dust collection. Just 4" deep shelves would be very useful. There are lots of ways to attach a dust collection port to your lathe bed and remove it when not needed. The vast majority of my sanding is within 12" of the headstock. It's amazing how many gadgets and gizmos you acquire when woodturning. You'll need lots of space to store this stuff so you can find it when you need it.
     
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  3. Mark Jundanian

    Mark Jundanian

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    Location (City & State):
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    I have my doubts about the dust collection. It might be more effective than some plans for corralling sanding dust, but I don't think that it will be any more effective for wood chips than standard solutions. Which is to say most of the wood chips will be on your shoes.

    The stand will limit your access to the turning from the back and end of the lathe, which depending on what and how you turn may cramp your style.

    I suggest making it, but by using screws rather than glue as much as practical. That way should your real life experience dictate a re-design you will have the opportunity.
     
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  4. RichColvin

    RichColvin

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    Michael,

    I put a dust collector below a midi lathe one time. It turned out to be a far worse idea than I’d thought it could be. The problem was that anything I dropped also ended up there. That included the nut on the end of the pen mandrel, which happened too many times to count. So, I ended up putting a “trap” into the suction line to catch the metal pieces, with a clean out to allow for their retrieval.

    Good luck in your endeavors.

    Kind regards,
    Rich
     
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  5. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Location (City & State):
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    Wood shavings and dust go everywhere except where you want them to go, with various tools used during the woodturning process shavings and dust will go in different directions.
     
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  6. Michael Ascenzi

    Michael Ascenzi

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    Location (City & State):
    Beverly, Massachusetts
    @Robert D Evans, Hey I agree about the storage. Thats why the dust collection is positioned out of the table. and not out of the back. the back wall I'll use french cleats or something of that nature to make tooling storage. as for the sanding, i'm going to add another round hole so I can attach a hose that will allow me to get up close.

    @Mark Jundanian, I was actually thinking that it would be more for dealing with smaller elements and for sweeping chips into that remain on the table top.

    As for access, I plan on moving the end of the lathe to the far left so I can turn off the end of the lathe, but your right I wouldn't have access to the back side. This is actually the first I've heard anything mentioned about turning off the back of the late.

    @RichColvin, My first thought was to build something directly under the lathe, but decided against that as I am sure I would be dropping things I didn't want to drop into the dust collector. Thats why I moved the dust collection ports to the back rather than directly underneath. There's still a risk, but I am sourcing the main dust chute from rockler.

    upload_2020-5-25_10-31-33.png

    I'm going to remove the lid and the side hooks, but the blue screen will remain for catching larger items. When I need to sweep larger chips I can just lift the blue screen.

    Thanks for the feedback. Its helpful as I design the final draft.
     
  7. Michael Ascenzi

    Michael Ascenzi

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    Location (City & State):
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    100% agree. I'm just trying to be proactive as I know dust and shavings will be everywhere short of doing this

    upload_2020-5-25_10-38-29.png

    but even if I do this, there is still going to be a mess at my feet. I need to make a stand and I figured while I was at it, I would try to work in some dust collection. I don't have a lot of space, and I have only one line from my dust collector. Its detachable, so I need to make it easy to connect/disconnect from the dust collection solution for the lathe. Which as you can see from the model, its on the front right side of the stand. The planer and table saw have integrated collection. I made a dust bucket for under my router table and I'm just trying to make something semi useful for the lathe. The only change I've made thus far is adding a round hole, that will allow me to plug in a flex house from the table top. Maybe add some t-track so I can add a stand to hold the hose. That sort of thing.

    upload_2020-5-25_10-43-44.png

    now that I think of it. I think I'm going to move the rectangular dust chutes left, as the lathe will be shifted to the far left.
     
  8. Russ Braun

    Russ Braun

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    Location (City & State):
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    Depending on your dust collection system, with mine, I find that emptying the Collection bag is far more challenging than getting the broom out. Having something in the way of your tool handle as noted earlier is not a good thing either. I suffer from both. My collection chute is in need of a redesign. This design kills the velocity of the vacuum; it captures dust during sanding just OK. Long handles are problematic with the side of the chute




    vacuum upload_2020-5-25_8-9-1.jpeg
     
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  9. Mark Jundanian

    Mark Jundanian

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    Turning from the backside can be helpful to undercut a rim or clear the inside shoulder of a hollow form. But you can also reverse the lathe motor or slide the headstock to the end of bed. Or just lean over the bed.
     
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  10. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    I do like what Russ has up above. This video link is one I did a while back. I am in the process of 'new and improving' it. The plastic is available in sheets up to 5 by 10 feet. I bought a 1/4 inch thick sheet, which is a bit stiff to do a lot of bending with. I am basically making a big C so the fixture is permanent and I can turn as well as sand without having to move it. I will make one for my mini lathe as well. The idea works. I don't use the dust collector for chips, just too much volume.


    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZsVc7qVx7A


    robo hippy
     
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  11. Michael Ascenzi

    Michael Ascenzi

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    @robo hippy

    Thats pretty slick. I like that. I think that would be a great add on, separate project. .

     
  12. Michael Ascenzi

    Michael Ascenzi

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    @Mark Jundanian,

    ok that makes sense. But as you pointed out I can always use reverse. Also, the back side will eventually have a jointer press up against the back. So I won't be able to get to the back in either case.


     
  13. Kent Crowell

    Kent Crowell

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    Location (City & State):
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    I needed to catch the fine dust at a middle school wood shop. The first down draft dust collector was based on someone’s cast off bathroom cabinet converted to a big box. Then we installed a squirrel cage fan salvaged from a furnace. Wired it up to run on lo, med lo, and med. With an open top, fitted a place for filters that we get from the contractor that changes them out. Made tray to go on top of the filter to catch large particles. Clean air exits straight down, hits floor and keeps your feet cool. We made it to hold 2 mini lathes. Makes clean up from pens a snap and keeps the air cleaner. How much sawdust can 175 kids make in a day. Also leave it running when we go to lunch. Remove filters weekly, tap outside, and ready to go. Height is the same as table saw and doubles as an outfeed table. Uses locking castors. Works great. Google “down draft sanding table” for similar dust catchers.
     
  14. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    RE: the stand. A simple rectangular shape may not be best. If the 'legs' angle a bit toward the center, more of a trapezoid cross section, you will potentially have more stability and less vibration. Nova/Teknatools used to have plans for a DIY base on their web site. It was designed for a midi sized lathe, if I recall correctly, so it might not be the dimensions you are looking for, and it definitely is not as sophisticated as the Sketch-up you have presented, but the geometry is the part that may help. I built one similar to it and it's very stable and solid. Long, long ago I built a work bench out of 9000 pounds of 2X6's at 90 degree angles and it's nowhere near as stable as the smaller, lighter trapezoid shape.
     
  15. Perry Hilbert

    Perry Hilbert

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    Location (City & State):
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    It would seem easier to add the collector as a down draft system, perhaps with a slide to seal off the part of the lathe not being used. I thought about a vinyl cover with magnets to hold it fast, but still easily moveable. It just seems that the intake vent system behind the lathe would work better
     

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