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Chuck size vs lathe size selection...

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by Michael Ascenzi, May 20, 2020.

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  1. Michael Ascenzi

    Michael Ascenzi

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    So I picked up the Laguna Revo 1216 and I'm finishing up tool selection. The next thing I'm looking at is the chuck. I think I've settled on ordering an Axeminster lathe chuck. But I'm not entirely sure which way to go. Either the sk100 or sk114. I'm looking at those two as, per videos, the different jaws available for each will work with either.

    I like the closed design of the sk114, but the open gear design of the sk100 doesn't push me away. I think it would just make it easier to clean and grease. I do like the allen key rather than the geared aspect of loosening and tightening the chuck on the sk114.

    However, I was more thinking the sizing of the chuck. They are not sized that much different, so does it really matter what size I go with for the lathe that I'm using. Obviously the sk114 will have more rotational mass, but I image the revo 1216 would be up for it.

    The sk114 is a little larger, so I'll be able to turn larger items than with the 1216. I think the limiting factor is more the lathe than either of the two chucks when it comes to size.

    Is there anything else I'm missing in regards to chuck selection?
     
  2. Mark Wollschlager

    Mark Wollschlager

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    I have the sk100 and like it.
    The exposed gear has not caused me any problem.
    I would buy the longer chuck key if you have the chance. The one that comes with the 100 is very short.
    The lathe I use it on is a bit larger than yours, I normally use a talon on my jet midi.
    My primary interest was for the O'Donnell jaws, which I really like.
     
    Michael Ascenzi likes this.
  3. Michael Ascenzi

    Michael Ascenzi

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    Hey Mark,

    Honestly, I'm leaning towards the sk100. I figured that would get me going with the wide range of projects I want to work with. Its cheaper than the sk114, and they have kits that come with some extras. I'm going to order directly from the UK. With shipping its still cheaper than Lee Valley, plus the kit seems to be only available from the UK.
     
  4. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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    Yes, this makes it sound like you are planning on only buying one chuck... Bwaaa Haaa haaa ha... Oops, sorry, that was quite rude on my part... It sounds like you have a great set up, I think you would be happy with either of those chucks as your "first" chuck. I too like the idea of an allen over a geared key as you can replace an allen at your local hardware store. I'm kidding about only one chuck, I know plenty of turners who have only one chuck... Ok, just one guy...
     
  5. Michael Ascenzi

    Michael Ascenzi

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    @Clifton C

    haha, yea ive gotten the impression multiple chucks were in my future. Did not think you were rude. However, lets just start with one... haha...
     
  6. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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  7. Russell Nugent

    Russell Nugent

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    I ordered my second chuck before my first one even arrived.
     
    Mark Jundanian likes this.
  8. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Several chuck options are useful for any size lathe to increase the productivity and reduce the frustration level of dropping screws when swapping jaws. Morse taper mounts also expand the range and usefulness of work piece mounting on all sizes of lathes. The Morse Taper MT2 is fairly common amongst a broad range of wood lathes commonly used, for the larger lathes you also have Morse taper reducers that will allow the use of your MT2 tools with your large lathes utilizing larger Morse tapers. The use of a Jacobs chuck will also increase the options on both ends of the lathe similar to other Morse taper accessories. These mounting options quickly expand the potential of all woodturners when these tools are added to the tool collection.
     
  9. Doug Freeman

    Doug Freeman

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    Chuck size is dictated by work size not lathe size. Just like lathes, larger chucks (with the right jaws) can do small work but smaller chucks are limited in work size. Its best to use a direct thread or insert (my preference) body that fits the spindle. You do not want an “adapter”, which extends the chuck out by 1-1/2-2”, although I do use one for a “mini” chuck I use for small items where the loads are small.

    The advantage I find with smaller chucks with smaller work is accessibility on the chuck end of the work. Get the smallest chuck that can handle the largest piece for your lathe size, if you can find chuck/jaw/work size info. I know Nova provides what I consider pretty conservative info on this (damn liability chasers) and I know I have seen some info other places, wish I could remember. Decide whether you will only turn inboard, 12” on that lathe, or outboard (16”?) then look for chuck & jaws based on that.

    IMO Grease or oil has no place to be used in a wood lathe chuck - just a magnet for dust and dirt. When purchased my chucks are degreased, deburred, and coated with non gumming rust inhibitor and then paste was on all moving/sliding surfaces. I rarely need to disassemble - a shot of compressed air blows everything out.
     
    Bill Boehme and Michael Ascenzi like this.
  10. Michael Ascenzi

    Michael Ascenzi

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    @Doug Freeman

    This is actually a great response. "Get the smallest chuck that can handle the largest piece for your lathe size", this makes 100% sense to me. I think I'm going to change my mind and go with the smaller sk80. This way when i eventually want to turn larger items, i'll pick up the sk114. This way I have a chuck for smaller projects, which I plan to start out on. I'll work up on sizes and when I move on to larger items I'll jump to the sk114, if I need to.

    Whats your opinion on Dry lubricant, such as silicon sprays. On my mtb, I typically use dry lubricants on my chain rear cassette. I can't stand how much grit is attracted with wet lubricants. Which is your point with grease/oil on the lathe.

     
  11. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    Silicone can cause problems with finishes. If it gets airborne in the area where you do your finishing, you might get a mysterious problem and not know where it's coming from.
     
  12. Robert D Evans

    Robert D Evans

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    I just wipe everything clean. I don't use any lubricant on my chucks. My shop is in a climate controlled basement so I don't have to worry about rust. The moving parts of a chuck are not subject to the friction of high speed. They only move when you turn the allen key or chuck. Getting dust gunked up with lubricant in the chuck is an unnecessary mess. Just keep it blown out and wiped off, especially after you get finish or glue on the chuck.
     
  13. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    What Doug says. A small chuck will hold just as well as a large chuck as long as you don't chuck up a piece of wood that is too large (the upper limit would be roughly 16 inches diameter).
     
  14. William Rogers

    William Rogers

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    Michael, I have both the SK100 and SK114 chucks. Both are great chucks. I would suggest the SK100 over the SK80 as there are more jaw options with the SK100. I can use almost any Axminister jaws between my chucks. I’m not sure of the same with the SK 80 chuck. I would advise against the SK114 at this time. This is because the Axminister chucks are direct thread and should you ever upgrade to a different spindle size. The SK 100 would be “ok” with an adapter, but I feel the SK114 would be a bit large with an adapter.

    Edit: I would also buy the spanner wrench for installation and removal of the SK 100 chuck. It makes it much easier.

    On my SK 100 I have their “C” jaws that are 50mm. On my SK 114 I have the O’Donnell Jaws that are for smaller work, but they live on that chuck. The O’Donnell Jaws are very versatile for a lot of things. I also have two other sets of jaws that can be used on either chuck. I also have the HTC 125 chuck that is used for larger bowls. This all works well for my Robust AB.
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2020

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