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Carrying tools

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by Michael Butterfield, Nov 29, 2012.

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  1. Michael Butterfield

    Michael Butterfield

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    I am hoping to start with the mentoring program offered by my local club and will be visiting different shops, and using different lathes. I'd like to bring my tools along and am curious what you use to carry your tools when traveling locally? Fancy tool roll, plastic bucket, PVC pipe, bag, or something else?
     
  2. john lucas

    john lucas AAW Forum Expert

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  3. john lucas

    john lucas AAW Forum Expert

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  4. Michael Butterfield

    Michael Butterfield

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    John, do you have to protect your tool edges to keep them from hitting each other when carrying in the toolbox?
     
  5. Mike Peace

    Mike Peace

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    I use short lengths of plastic tubing you can buy in different diameters from Lowes by the foot. Another technique one demonstrator used was just wrap the tip in painters tape. Take the roll with you for the return trip!
     
  6. Michael Butterfield

    Michael Butterfield

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    I have some old bike innertubes which might work great for sheathing the tool edges.

    Edit to add: I also use them as rope and as hose to blow sawdust out of hollow forms.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2012
  7. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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    Given the current "zero tolerance" policies in public schools, make sure you have a full description and permission slip for all your tools before entering a school. Probably wise to precoordinate when entering any public facility like a community center, as well.

    Be sure to take that Gerber tool off your belt before you enter a school, too. DAMHIKT
     
  8. john lucas

    john lucas AAW Forum Expert

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    I put a protective cover on the skew because I keep it razor sharp. I also put tubing of different sizes on any carbide tools to keep them from hitting anything else and chipping. I don't worry about the gouges they seem to do fine.
    I have done quite a few demos in school art departments. I've never had a single problem. You do have to sign in at the principals office. The kids really love it so I would highly recommend it. One time I thought I was doing a demo for a 3rd grade class. turns out I was doing demos every 30 minutes for all the classes. I ran out of wood pretty fast so I started taking pencils and crayons from the students and turned those. that was much better than the other projects I had planned to turn.
     
  9. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Good tips from all!:p The bike innertubes and Lowe's tubing would work great and last a long time.
    John, what did you turn from the crayons?
     
  10. jschnell1203

    jschnell1203

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    I help teach down in out Technical school so I built a 5 gal full of 2 inch PVC pipe. I wrap sets of 3 together together with 2 sets of tape, then tape them all together into a big round, then 3 sets of tie wraps, insert into bucket then put in expanding foam. After a few days of drying and expanding I popped it out of the buck and clean of top and bottom with a saw blade. I've had a few suggestions like a rought wood disk or rubber mat at the bottom. Also you can leave the center round and put in a container in the middle for smaller things like chuck used the heavier PVC and would recommend using the lighter one because of weight. I think I used 16 of 12 inch pieces and is heavy without tools. I cut the pipe with my chop saw but be carefull and use clamps for every cut and a fine toothe blade, support the pipe. Have fun and pot pictures. I take some today. Oh yea another thing make sure the foam has dried/cured before putting tools in it. You then can also put another but on top and tie it altogther. I've see another person use the second buck as a stand so it's easier to grab tools from it.
     
  11. Gun Case

    Checkout the local sporting goods store for rifle and pistol cases. I find that most of my tools are too long for the 22" Craftsman case. Need something that holds tools up to 26" long. Rifle/pistol cases can be purchased in a variety of sizes. The foam lining in the case holds the tools firmly and keeps them from moving around. Since the tools do not move, I don't have to worry about sharp ends piercing the case. Circular cutout in foam for chucks and other specialized tools. Give it a try! - John
     
  12. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    5 gallon plastic bucket.

    On the zero tolerance, I was teaching at a school in Oklahoma, every kid carried a folding knife.
     
  13. Patrick Miller

    Patrick Miller

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    bucket brigade

    I use a rectangular laundry soap bucket (Costco methinks). I cut a piece of 2x4 to fit in half of the top of the bucket. I drilled a number of 1/2" to 1-1/8" holes in the wood that lets me drop the tools in. The handles are sticking straight up and the tips protected and I can swing the bail up to carry the bucket. I use the additional space in the bottom of the bucket for a chuck, bowl blank, whatever else I may need to carry. The nice thing is I have a place to put my tools while I am using them especially during a demo as the lathe is often setting out by itself....and everything smells springtime fresh!
     
  14. jschnell1203

    jschnell1203

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    Here's the pictures of it. Also Hard Golf Club cases I've seen being used.
     

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  15. Scott Austin

    Scott Austin

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    At You When I was driving back and forth to my turning classes I had this issue. I built a handy little tool caddy that worked good. It holds 8 gouged plus a couple places for spur centers and misc. Things. Very simple to make. Two boards of whatever material you have handy. Tape them together and drill your holes to whatever diameter fits your tools. Drill holes all the way through the top board and.halfway through the bottom board. Align them and fasten them together with two risers and turn yourself a nice handle to hold the top together and you have a nice handy tool caddy. Make the base wide enough that it will ride ok sitting in the floorboards of your car. It is also handy because you can sit it on the floor next to your lathe and all.your tools are stood up and organized within easy reach. And there is a good chance that you have enough scrap laying around to build it and it won't cost you a dime.
     
  16. john lucas

    john lucas AAW Forum Expert

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    I'm currently working on getting my traveling tools so that they all can be removed from the handles. This makes the tool much shorter and it's easier to protect the tips. I went to the last demo with the shorter of the 2 Sears Toolboxes. I've made them all fit handles that use the same set screws so it just takes a couple of minutes to put the blades back in.
     
  17. Ian Robertson

    Ian Robertson

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    That looks like a rocket pod on a blackhawk.;)

    I use a canvas roll that has divisions sewn in.
     
  18. odie

    odie

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    Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
    That there is a terrific idea......quick access, and easy tote.

    Thanks

    ooc
     
  19. Michael Butterfield

    Michael Butterfield

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    Thank you for all of the great tips! I think I decided to make an open top wood tool box with turned handle and protect the tool edges with electrical tape or bike innertube. I'll post pictures when I make it after the New Year.
     
  20. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    Maybe we can make a Caddy Shack style Rodney Dangerfield remote control version?
     
  21. Grant Wilkinson

    Grant Wilkinson

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