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Bondo Rotted Wood Restorer

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Bruce Miller, Feb 15, 2021.

  1. Bruce Miller

    Bruce Miller

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2019
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    Location (City & State):
    Glen Spey, New York
    https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/company...ed-Wood-Restorer/?N=5002385+3293240936&rt=rud

    Anyone ever use this stuff for Punky wood. I picked up a can this weekend and just now applied it to some really nicely spalted maple that maybe is/was a little too rotted.
    It applies very thinly soaking up into the fibers and you then put subsequent coats on it that seem to fill in the punky fibers real nicely with a crystal clear coating.
    I think it might be a good alternative to the super glue application.
    Any experience with this stuff?
     
  2. Bob Sheppard

    Bob Sheppard

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    Location (City & State):
    South Plainfield, NJ
    I've used the Minwax Wood Hardener quite a bit. It's probably the same stuff as the Bondo. It does penetrate deeply into soft/punky wood. I usually wipe a coat over the entire piece when done with the turning, so any finish will go on uniformly.
     
  3. Randy Anderson

    Randy Anderson

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    Haven't tried it but interested to know how it works. I deal with a fair amount of punky wood, sometimes on the edge of usability. It's a challenge to work with but I really like the result when it works out. I've been using JB Weld Wood restorer and like it but don't have any experience with other products. Running low so good to know before I get more.
     
  4. Tim Connell

    Tim Connell

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    Jan 22, 2018
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    Location (City & State):
    Cameron, Illinois
    Rather than pay the high prices for mostly solvent, I've been experimenting by thinning epoxy with acetone. Around 60% epoxy and 40% acetone. Been happy with the results so far on the half dozen or so bowls I've tried it on.
     
  5. Richard Coers

    Richard Coers

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    Location (City & State):
    Peoria, Illinois
  6. Bruce Miller

    Bruce Miller

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2019
    Messages:
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    Location (City & State):
    Glen Spey, New York
    Thanks Tim for the money saving idea. I have plenty of both of those ingredients.
    it is a bit pricey for what it is
     

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