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Best Full-Sized Lathe / Upgrade Help

Joined
Feb 8, 2021
Messages
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Location
Vancouver,WA
The Record Power Coronet Regent is an interesting machine. Rotating/pivoting & sliding headstock, outrigger capability for outboard turning, and 2HP/220v. The only drawback of concern may be that it's a bit 'lightweight' across the board in terms of build and actual weight (less than 400 lbs overall). Around $2,400, though I haven't found one in stock for certain, yet. I could see making use of the pivoting headstock a lot of access and saving the old man back that I have ;). Default swing is 18" but it's easy to get more via slide, pivot, or roatate to outboard of I understand correctly. Interesting feature set but I've zero experience first or second hand about Record Power machines or the company.

PS I hope the new YouTube channel is behind a paywall - nobody wants to see that...
 
Joined
Feb 5, 2021
Messages
69
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32
Location
Melbourne, AR
The Record Power Coronet Regent is an interesting machine. Rotating/pivoting & sliding headstock, outrigger capability for outboard turning, and 2HP/220v. The only drawback of concern may be that it's a bit 'lightweight' across the board in terms of build and actual weight (less than 400 lbs overall). Around $2,400, though I haven't found one in stock for certain, yet. I could see making use of the pivoting headstock a lot of access and saving the old man back that I have ;). Default swing is 18" but it's easy to get more via slide, pivot, or roatate to outboard of I understand correctly. Interesting feature set but I've zero experience first or second hand about Record Power machines or the company.

Allen, received an email yesterday from Tim at Turners Warehouse in AZ saying they just received the Envoy & Regent lathes.
 

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Joined
Feb 5, 2021
Messages
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Location
Melbourne, AR
You own one, Larry?
No I don’t Allen. During my search/research for a new lathe, I came across these models but they weren’t available yet. Contact with Ed at Highland Woodworking in GA, Chad and Tim at Turners Warehouse in AZ and Mike Davies from Record Power were my contacts during the awaited release/arrival of the lathes. The email yesterday was just my notification of there arrival. Rusty Nesmith has a new Envoy.
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
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Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
The only drawback of concern may be that it's a bit 'lightweight' across the board in terms of build and actual weight (less than 400 lbs overall).

Allen......One thing about it, is the motor is directly attached to the headstock, putting weight directly where it might be making the most good.

Weight elsewhere will also help to absorb minute vibration, but the worst place to add weight for that purpose, is on the legs. To my thinking, adding weight to the legs, as it seems most turners add weight there......is helpful, mainly for keeping the lathe from "walking" with out-of-balance turnings.

Just a thought here.......I wonder if one could epoxy bulk weight to the headstock and bedways......adding to the "good weight".....?????

-----odie-----
 
Joined
Feb 8, 2021
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Location
Vancouver,WA
I'll have to find out how tall that lathe (Regent) is and how tall it can get. One attractive thing about the PM3520C is the riser blocks. I'm 6'2...
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
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Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
I'll have to find out how tall that lathe (Regent) is and how tall it can get. One attractive thing about the PM3520C is the riser blocks. I'm 6'2...
I'm a shortie, so that doesn't make as much difference to me........:D

One thing about it, that 3520C seems to have the weight where it counts! .....and the banjo has the pinch type securing method for the 1" tool rest post. I like cast iron......everything about it, seems to be well thought out, and engineered. I believe I would have already bought that lathe, if it had a rotating headstock.....:rolleyes:......that is the deal killer for me.

I understand that it may be the perfect lathe for someone else, though......same for the VL240, AB, Oneway, and a few other top-of-the-line lathes. :)

-----odie-----
 
Joined
Oct 25, 2020
Messages
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70
Location
Minneapolis, MN
Food for thought on equipment, the best lathe, the perfect lathe for you......

The well know author says to the equally well know photographer "I've always admired your work, what kind of camera do you use"? The photographer pauses in thought, then replies "your books are my favorites, what kind of typewriter do you use"?
Doug, that is perfect! I belong to a small, local photography club, I'm going to share this with the group. Thanks for posting!
 
Joined
Feb 8, 2021
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12
Location
Vancouver,WA
Food for thought on equipment, the best lathe, the perfect lathe for you......

The well know author says to the equally well know photographer "I've always admired your work, what kind of camera do you use"? The photographer pauses in thought, then replies "your books are my favorites, what kind of typewriter do you use"?
Well said
 
Joined
Feb 8, 2021
Messages
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Location
Vancouver,WA
Someone gave me a video demo of the Record Power Coronet Regent lathe and it's definitely a contender for me due to its ergonomic features. The bed extension and outrigger are affordable. 18" swing (39" w/ outrigger). Slowest speed is 200rpm. 2hp motor and a 3 step pulley system. The included under bed shelf can be loaded up with tools or bags of cement/sand to add weight, if needed. The 320~375lb weight is one of my main concerns. How much of one I don't know? A less than $3000 price tag with outrigger and bed extension is nice. Some concern about ability to use a vacuum chuck with it.

That brings me back to the Laguna 2436. Outboard turning, sliding headstock, side mount or end of lathe lowered extension all are features and two of those include the tailstock being able to be used. Laguna sells a vacuum chuck for their lathes, a plus. 610lbs. 3hp motor. 50rpm lowest speed. Only 2 step pulleys. Spindle lock will require a workaround. I do really like the look and feel plus my experience w/ Laguna lathes. $4000 price tag is fine.

The Harvey T60s has sliding headstock but no outboard turning and the motor still is a bit of an unknown. Swing away tailstock a nice feature. 24" swing, 2hp (servo) motor, 60rpm lowest speed, 726lbs. Still need to find out the truth about cost. Only 2 step pulleys. Looks great and very solidly built. Listed at $5300 in some places and $3500 in others.

Everyone knows the 5yr warranty, weight (700+lbs), and gereral info on the Powermatic 3520C. $4000 price tag

Mass/weight vs power vs ergonomics....

Also, turning outboard or on the end of some lathes is done tailstock-free. While others find a way to incorporate being able to use the tailstock at the end and/or outboard, or even on the side near the headstock with a lower bed extension for additional capacity. Important or not for some lathes vs others?
 
Joined
Jul 10, 2017
Messages
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511
Location
Windermere, British Columbia
Someone gave me a video demo of the Record Power Coronet Regent lathe and it's definitely a contender for me due to its ergonomic features. The bed extension and outrigger are affordable. 18" swing (39" w/ outrigger). Slowest speed is 200rpm. 2hp motor and a 3 step pulley system. The included under bed shelf can be loaded up with tools or bags of cement/sand to add weight, if needed. The 320~375lb weight is one of my main concerns. How much of one I don't know? A less than $3000 price tag with outrigger and bed extension is nice. Some concern about ability to use a vacuum chuck with it.

That brings me back to the Laguna 2436. Outboard turning, sliding headstock, side mount or end of lathe lowered extension all are features and two of those include the tailstock being able to be used. Laguna sells a vacuum chuck for their lathes, a plus. 610lbs. 3hp motor. 50rpm lowest speed. Only 2 step pulleys. Spindle lock will require a workaround. I do really like the look and feel plus my experience w/ Laguna lathes. $4000 price tag is fine.

The Harvey T60s has sliding headstock but no outboard turning and the motor still is a bit of an unknown. Swing away tailstock a nice feature. 24" swing, 2hp (servo) motor, 60rpm lowest speed, 726lbs. Still need to find out the truth about cost. Only 2 step pulleys. Looks great and very solidly built. Listed at $5300 in some places and $3500 in others.

Everyone knows the 5yr warranty, weight (700+lbs), and gereral info on the Powermatic 3520C. $4000 price tag

Mass/weight vs power vs ergonomics....

Also, turning outboard or on the end of some lathes is done tailstock-free. While others find a way to incorporate being able to use the tailstock at the end and/or outboard, or even on the side near the headstock with a lower bed extension for additional capacity. Important or not for some lathes vs others?
If you phone company to prices clarify I believe it’s 5300 for t60 and 3500 for t40.
 
Joined
Feb 8, 2021
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Location
Vancouver,WA
I believe someone phoned them and they said it was the T-40 a mistake. But I could be wrong. I looked on every store that seems to sell them and the 5t40 is 3500.
I'm getting ahead of myself but the Harvey website will let you add the t60s to a cart at that 3.5k price...interesting
 
Joined
Feb 8, 2021
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43
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12
Location
Vancouver,WA
Question: how important is weight in a full-sized lathe? I'm having trouble navigating the differences in weights as some are 300-ish lbs and some are closer to 700 lbs. Feedback needed on this please.

I understand stability and vibration to some extent and I won't be doing gigantic logs necessarily, but I will be hollowing and mounting some logs and larger pieces, probably coring, as well as doing some resin work. Can I get away with a lathe on the lower end of weight or is it simply: the heavier the better?
 
Joined
Jul 17, 2010
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Location
Waco, TX
Hi Allen I believe in weight, that being said, mine is bolted to the floor as well. Don’t forget to look at the Oneway 1640 with the outboard extension. Very nice solid lathe.
 
Joined
Apr 1, 2019
Messages
251
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118
Location
Bashaw, Alberta
Question: how important is weight in a full-sized lathe? I'm having trouble navigating the differences in weights as some are 300-ish lbs and some are closer to 700 lbs. Feedback needed on this please.

I understand stability and vibration to some extent and I won't be doing gigantic logs necessarily, but I will be hollowing and mounting some logs and larger pieces, probably coring, as well as doing some resin work. Can I get away with a lathe on the lower end of weight or is it simply: the heavier the better?
I rough turn max size bowls, and core on my nova saturn quite often without any real issues. It's only around 300 piunds I think. More weight would be a help and I may get around to it some day. If I make my lathe dance with an out of balance large blank i don't blame my lathe , I just need to slow down.
 
Joined
Jul 10, 2017
Messages
685
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511
Location
Windermere, British Columbia
Question: how important is weight in a full-sized lathe? I'm having trouble navigating the differences in weights as some are 300-ish lbs and some are closer to 700 lbs. Feedback needed on this please.

I understand stability and vibration to some extent and I won't be doing gigantic logs necessarily, but I will be hollowing and mounting some logs and larger pieces, probably coring, as well as doing some resin work. Can I get away with a lathe on the lower end of weight or is it simply: the heavier the better?
I own two Oneway‘s. I would not even consider a light lathe.
 

Dave Landers

Beta Tester
Joined
Dec 1, 2014
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Location
Estes Park, CO
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dlwoodturning.com
how important is weight in a full-sized lathe?
Weight is good for stability. But it's all relative - if you are going to be turning mainly spindles and small things, then weight is not so important (and it limits your ability to reorganize/rearrange your shop). Larger off-center bowls need a heavier lathe to keep it from dancing around (even at reasonable slower speeds). Well-balanced bowls (like maybe segmented work), even when larger, probably fall somewhere in the middle.

But in my opinion, you should get the lathe you want and worry about weight later. I added a box to the shelf hanger brackets on the legs of my PM3520B and filled it with sand - added a couple hundred pounds to an already beefy lathe. You can also bolt your lathe to the floor, and then it weighs about as much as the Earth (depending on how well your shop is connected to the Earth).
 
Joined
Oct 14, 2019
Messages
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13
Location
Mukwonago, Wisconsin
I really like my JWL 1840 EVS. I also do mainly bowls and platters. The headstock slides very easily and the tail stock is not so heavy as to be a burden to remove when working off the end of the lathe. Virtually every bowl gets roughed and a tenon added with tailstock support. Then reversed, chucked, hollowed and finished off the end of the lathe. I also like the 50-100 RPM range for sanding. No more melted sandpaper from overheating. I activated the remote emergency stop once with my thigh when a large blank started coming loose. It has a magnetic base and can be moved to where you need it. Five year warranty and 10% off through the end of the month with free shipping. BTW, Laguna has a two year warranty in spite of what their literature says. I double checked that before buying my 18 BX bandsaw last year.
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
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Location
Eugene, OR
Well, weight can always be added. Probably equally important to reduce vibration is to make sure all 4 feet are sitting equally on the floor. No floor is perfectly level/flat. I did residential concrete for 30 years, and every one I ever worked for told me I was too dang fussy to do concrete work, I should have been a finish carpenter... I wouldn't expect my floors to be that level. There is an art to making sure all 4 feet are equal. You have to start with leveling up the lathe first. Then back off one foot so it is floating. Put an unbalanced piece on the lathe and spin it fast enough so the lathe starts to vibrate, but not so fast it might launch... Then adjust that one foot down till vibration stops or is almost stopped. Maybe extend it past a little bit, then back it off again. You may have to do this a couple of times. Then, mark where your feet are on the floor, I use a Sharpie. Your lathe will want to walk when you turn unbalanced pieces, so you may need to move it back. Once 'perfect' balance has been reached, you can add all the weight you can stack onto it. Bolting to the floor is another option. I would make sure, before bolting, that all 4 feet are equal pressure/weight. The extra mass makes a big difference for turning any unbalanced piece. Not so much for spindles.

robo hippy
 
Joined
Feb 8, 2021
Messages
43
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12
Location
Vancouver,WA
I've noticed the though-hole bore of the spindle is either 5/8 or 3/8" on most machines. I'm curious about this, particularly as it relates to vacuum chuck systems. Any thoughts?

Also, the lowest speed can be anywhere from 50rpm on some lathes or 200~250rpm lowest speed on others. How much is this a factor in your experiences?

Thanks (PS most lathes have a 4~6 week wait time so I may as well learn as much as I can - I'll be waiting anyway!)
 
Joined
May 31, 2019
Messages
101
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89
Location
Highland, MI
I would think that the only thing about spindle ID that would affect vacuum chucking would be making sure that whatever you use adapter is the right size,
My first lathe only went down to 250rpm and there were several times when I wished it went lower. My current lathe goes down to almost zero and I do use the lower speeds on occasion.
I don't have nearly as much experience as most people here, so take my opinions with several grains of salt. The lime & tequila are up to you.
 
Joined
Feb 26, 2019
Messages
500
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263
Location
Lebanon, Missouri
Lowest speed depends on 2 things
1) Do you sand or do any finish steps on the lathe? Lower is better. Mine goes to 100 rpm which is ofor round stuff, I do warped 1 turn by turning by hand.
2) how big do you want to go. Large unbalanced pieces may need to be at < 100 rpm for initial cuts, or just to check how unbalanced it is. Would not want to start a large unbalanced piece at 200-300 rpm. Once kind of balanced, Surface speed of the wood past the edge is what is important. As size grows rpm drops. Weight helps a lot with unbalanced work - size-weight of the piece and rpm determine the forces involved. Weight can be added to any lathe.

Dont think the spindle through hole diameter is critical. Will effect fittings etc for vacuum chuck.

Write down what is important to you for a lathe and then prioritize the list. No one here would have the same items listed, and priority would be all over the place. A lathe is a tool to produce something, and the something (ex: spindle, bowl, hollow form) drives the design of the tool. There are also different methods (ex: fixed, sliding, pivoting headstock). Knowing the something to be produced, and the desired method, will result in the proper tool to be used. It is a process design model. Luxuries can then be added until the accountant says NO!
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
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997
Location
Eugene, OR
I have wanted to do a play date on one of them. Never had the chance. Best commercially made lathe for going big... I looked at them up at the symposium in Portland 10+ years ago and went for the Robust. The VB is mostly a bowl lathe....

robo hippy
 
Joined
Feb 8, 2021
Messages
43
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12
Location
Vancouver,WA
I appreciate all the feedback. Measuring my shop space I think the Harvey may actually be too big! Specs say 90". Surely that can't be right? I'm not sure how to reconcile the footprint vs the length specs given (below):

harvey.JPG

I have to say that unless I firmly decide I "need" a rotating headstock (RP): I like the steel bed ways, 3hp, and 24" swing of the Laguna 2436. The scalability of features, including a wheel kit, swing-away tailstock, and easily identifiable vacuum chuck are all nice things. Waiting until the end of May, isn't, of course ideal (backordered). I've read but haven't seen that they sell riser pads to increase the height?

The Harvey stands at 44" to spindle, which is a bout 3" shorter than I want but I'm sure something could be figured out. The Harvey looks very nice and there isn't much not to like other than perhaps a more expensive repair should the motor have issues. The motor is an unknown in many ways, to me. Priced less than the Laguna 2436 and the tailstock pendant is standard. I can't see on in person, however.

Unfortunately, the Record Powers are sold out everywhere. Wait TBD if I go that route. It all seems a bit more light-duty than a 'last lathe' type purchase, but my mind could change still.

I may have already pulled the trigger on ordering a new machine but my Durango broke down a few days ago and it's a motor problem (5.7L Hemi V8) and likely a bent lifter or something perhaps worse. So, I didn't want to drop 4K on a lathe until I get a firm estimate on my truck. Sadly, priorities sometimes get in the way, lol. That said I've still budgeted for the lathe. I hope to decide in the next few days.

Perhaps familiarity with the Laguna 1216 gives me a comfort level. I'm going down the the local Woodcrafters to put my hands on the 1836 (in stock, actually) and see how that machine looks and feels in person. I like the added HP, swing, and controls of the 2436 vs the 1836 but they're similar enough to get a good feel for.

Ultimately, the only choices with a "good" warranty are the PM3520c and Rikon 70-3040 (5yrs each). Haven't totally ruled out the old standby, PM.
 
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