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Applying Epoxy

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Emiliano Achaval, Apr 12, 2020.

  1. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    I have been using the brass threaded inserts with the last few urns I made. I used to make an insert and then chase threads. This added a lot of time, and I have run out of big pieces of boxwood. I like to make my opening at least 2.5 inches wide. I'm using the 3-inch brass insert. Rick Brantley recommends 5 minute epoxy for the inserts. The recent post about using an eyedropper type of applicator with CA made my light bulb go off. What if I can suck up the mixed epoxy into a syringe to then apply it where it goes. Right now i'm using little popsicle sticks and some skewers. I tape the area around the spigot to prevent staining. I know a syringe would be a one time use. Price is not a problem, I'm getting good money for my urns. The question is if the epoxy is too thick. Has anybody tried this? Or do you have any tips to apply epoxy more efficiently? Thanks in advance, stay safe, Aloha
     
  2. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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    I cut a 4x4 inch piece of freezer paper (heavy duty wax paper), squeeze, mix mix mix, then fold in half long way, then the other, fold in the corners, then fold down the open end. You end up with a little pointy thing that looks like a miniature piping bag for decorating cakes. Snip the point as big or small as you want and pipe away, no muse no fuss. It is tempting to move the blob of epoxy to the middle of the square, but its easier to fold if it's spread out a bit.
    Regular wax paper works, I just happen to have the other.
     
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  3. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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    Pic worth 1000 words...
    epoxy piping bag.JPG

    But if it looks like this, you've gone too far...
    Too far.JPG
     
  4. Dave Bunge

    Dave Bunge

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    West Systems sells syringes for use with epoxy and has some info about using the syringes to bond fasteners: https://www.westsystem.com/application-tools/syringes/

    It looks like they are available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Adhesive-App...&keywords=epoxy+syringe&qid=1586692805&sr=8-4

    I don't have any affiliation with the company, but should disclose that I have very positive vibes towards them. I got the opportunity to to tour their plant and labs. And some of their technical folks spoke at a meeting of my woodworking club. They have a strong technical support dept and may be able to suggest options for you if you call them: https://www.westsystem.com/contact/need-help/

    Dave
     
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  5. Paul M. Kaplowitz

    Paul M. Kaplowitz

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    I fold a piece of thin cardboard,(like a cereal box cardboard). Flatten it out, mix epoxy on it, heat it with a torch or heat iron from under the cardboard. Epoxy will thin to water consistency. Refold cardboard and pour.
     
  6. john lucas

    john lucas AAW Forum Expert

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    You can get large needle.syringes from Harbour Freight and probably on line. They workmwell.with thicker. epoxies. They can be re used by cleaning them.with alcohol afterwords. I used to use a glue called F26 for gluing metal to wood. It stays somewhat flexible. I dont know if it's still available. Cant be used with a syringe however.
     
  7. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Get syringes from a farm supply. Needle isn't needed. Cost about 50 cents for the smaller ones. Used them to mix epoxy for custom fishing rods. I used a syringe for each part and stored them in a cottage cheese container with holes in the lid. Mix on aluminum foil. Gently blow through a soda straw to remove the bubbles. BTW, fold the epoxy and do not mix. Folding keeps bubbles to a minimum. Hold the straw off to the side as you don't want any breath condensation to drip into the epoxy. This was for small amounts of 2-3 cc of each part.
     
  8. Robert Satterfield

    Robert Satterfield

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    I get my syringes from the local Vet clinic...Dairy farms in the area keep the supply high and cost low!
     
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  9. Mark Jundanian

    Mark Jundanian

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  10. Roger Wiegand

    Roger Wiegand

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    I do it all the time. Rinse the syringe with acetone and you can re-use indefinitely. It's hard to push epoxy through a needle smaller than 18 ga.
     
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  11. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    In rod building, you need thin epoxy to coat the thread. With 2 part epoxy in plastic jars, you can nuke them in the microwave for a few seconds (10-20 seconds, not minutes) and the epoxy when mixed will be thin and easier to drip from a syringe. (repeated heating does not affect the epoxy components long term) Like John, I mix on aluminum foil so there are no fibers showing in the finish, but people won't be able to see your epoxy. And bubbles probably won't matter for you either.

    Clifton's idea is slick--thanks for sharing that. It should work for filling cracks with good control, too.
     
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  12. Rick Crawford

    Rick Crawford

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    Check the marine supply stores in your area, as they carry epoxy and supplies. I've used West System products alot when working on boats. They used to put out a newsletter which was quite informative...check their website.
     
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  13. Rick Brantley

    Rick Brantley

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    While we are talking about epoxy and syringes, I buy the large ones from Farm and Fleet locally and store the two parts in them. I had noticed I was using the clear part faster than the amber fluid. Now I can use the increments on the syringe to squeeze out the same amount each time. Made a little stand to hold the syringes upside down and cap it with a wire connector between uses.
     
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  14. Tim Tucker

    Tim Tucker

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    I am a cheapskate. There...I have said it publicly:D....I have used a lot of different methods to apply epoxy. But the one that comes to mind for your particular usage is to mix the epoxy- then transfer it into the appropriate zip-lock baggie. cut the corner off the baggie - careful...make the cut small - it is surprising how small a hole you may need....then, use it like a cake decorator. Twist, fold, or squeeze it to suit your needs and get the material where you want.
     
  15. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    Grear easy and inexpensive solution!!! Genious! Appreciated. Aloha
     
  16. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    I sort of needed that extra visual help. Thank you for taking the time to do it.
     
  17. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    Is the opening of a regular animal syringe big enough for the epoxy to flow in and out Bob?
     
  18. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    So many great ideas! We have a local supplier here, I will check them out when we can travel again...
     
  19. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    Another good option, yes Mark, this would work. But, dont you have to still stir some after they come out of the mixing tip? Or is it ready to go? This would be easy, fast and painless. Great option!
     
  20. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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  21. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    Hello Rick!! Thanks for the tip. I buy the 5-minute epoxy at Ace, 2 small containers, Devcon is the brand I think. I had the same problem as you, and now I use a small accurate digital scale to make sure.
     
  22. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    Well, I ordered epoxy syringes form West systems, 4 packs of the epoxy with the mixing tips. While I wait, I will be doing some Origami, that's another great option. Thank you, everyone! Aloha.
     
  23. Roger Wiegand

    Roger Wiegand

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    I used to have occasional issues with epoxy not hardening and such, I switched to dispensing by weight instead of volume and those problems disappeared. Just as in baking, it's much easier to get accurate proportions if you weigh your ingredients, especially for measuring small amounts. (the ratios are slightly different than the volume ratios for some products, as the components have different densities). Now that accurate digital balances are cheap this is easy to do.
     
  24. Don Wattenhofer

    Don Wattenhofer

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    Please excuse me for switching subject but:
    Why would you want to mix wood and metal especially in that large a diameter.
    Wood expands and contracts due to moisture changes where as metal changes due to heat (I do understand that you have less variation in humidity out there in the tropics).
    Using machine cut threads it can be done in any wood you can think of, and if the wood is too soft first cut a partial thread, soak with thin CA then make the final cut.
    I have been machine threading for close to 30 years, the first set up was to add a height block to the headstock with a shaft and sprocket to drive the router carriage. The final and best method is to use my old LaBlond lathe with an adapter for 1 1/4" 8 thread so that I can screw the wood turning chuck onto the LaBlond as in the picture. The added feature is that you can make jigs similar to jam chucks except with the mating thread so the bottom of the urn can be turned and the lid can also be finish turned. The piece in the first photo below is the start of the lid for the Urn in my profile and the second photo is the male threaded "jam chuck" with the urn ready to be threaded on for finishing the base.
    101_1340.JPG 101_1331.JPG
     
  25. John Tisdale

    John Tisdale

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    Emiliano,
    Please send me a link to the mfg of the brass inserts for urns - I have one to make for a friends mom.

    Regarding the epoxy: try WEST G-Flex 655.
    PROS: It's thick (doesn't run or even sag), maintains flexibility (used primarily for boat repair), long working time/24-hr set, colors easily (I uses System-3 pigments), and cures at 40F
    CONS: It's noxious, nasty, and should be measured on a jeweler's scale. And expensive - two quart cans are about $110.

    While I use syringes down to #23 with Aero Marine low viscosity, I've never shot G-Flex - might try with a really big needle. For most inserts, a little child's tempera brush would work fine.
    And while it will sand, best to put in on prior to final turning if your filling worm-holes or impregnating bark.

    And, for what it's worth, I think combining a brass insert with the wood adds a touch of class. And permanence.
    John
     
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  26. Rick Brantley

    Rick Brantley

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    Hi John, I make the brass inserts for other woodturners to make threaded lids. My site is http://www.fromwalnuttoantlers.com. Thanks for asking Emiliano.
     
  27. Rick Brantley

    Rick Brantley

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    Don, you and Emiliano have abilities I can only hope to someday acquire. I tried making threads and just found it frustrating. I had to remake two urns with the wood threading issues I encountered. Then I read about using the PVC and ABS fittings and thought these will be great as they can flex if needed with warping. I felt if I can't make real wood threads, brass would look nicer than plastic. Maybe more respectful than plastic. Brass just filled the bill for my tastes and abilities. I haven't had an urn crack due to wood movement - thankfully yet, but my work is mainly segmented kiln dried wood so movement is nil. Now when I'm not turning wood, I'm making threaded brass inserts for myself, and offering them to other woodturners for as long as they are fun to make for me.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2020
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  28. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    I have made several urns and hundreds of boxes with hand chased threads. I was one of the demonstrators in Raleigh, I showed how to do a box with hand chased threads. Since my urns are made out of Koa and or MIlo, I can't chase threads. I won't use CA. I ended up making Boxwood, lignum, quebracho and several other hardwoods inserts. This adds several hours to a project. ANd these woods are expensive. I'm a production turner, not a hobbyist. I can't spend endless hours on a piece. The brass inserts are a godsend item. They have taken hours out of making an urn. Once you set the insert with epoxy either the wood or the insert are not going anywhere.
     
  29. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    Thanks for the advice John. I appreciated it. I agree the brass adds a touch of class to the urns. I'm not sure what my little digital scale was intended for, but it seems to be super accurate. I have not had any problems with my mixing. I did have problems when I measured "by eye" I'm glad Rick already answered you. He has one of the fastest shipping times I have ever seen! You will love hos product. Aloha.
     
  30. Matthew Ferriter

    Matthew Ferriter

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    Rick - do you still sell the threaded brass inserts? I took a look at your website and don't see them currently listed. Thanks.
     
  31. Glenn Lefley

    Glenn Lefley

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    I believe he pasted away. I think his family is going to try and start making them in the future,
     
  32. GRJensen

    GRJensen

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    Here is his obituary ... Rick was a good guy ... he will be missed.
     
  33. Matthew Ferriter

    Matthew Ferriter

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    Wow - sorry to hear it. From the looks of the items that had been listed on his website, he was very talented at both wood- and metal-working.
     

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