1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. ATTENTION FORUM MEMBERS!

    Guest, if you have not yet updated your forum bookmark to a secure log in connection, please delete your unsecure book and add the following secure bookmark: https://www.aawforum.org/community/index.php

    You can dismiss this notice by clicking the X in the upper right of the notice box.

    Dismiss Notice

Anchorseal vs Anchorseal 2

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by john lucas, Sep 28, 2012.

  1. john lucas

    john lucas AAW Forum Expert

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2004
    Messages:
    7,317
    Location (City & State):
    Cookeville TN USA
    We have started a discussion on these on another Forum and would like to get your opinion both on how you use it and which you prefer. If you can tell my why you prefer one over the other.
    I'm getting ready to buy another 5 gallons and would like to know. I am going to call UC coatings in a day or so and talk to the tech rep as well.
    If you have another sealer you prefer please fill me in on that as well.
    Also any other methods for preserving wood either before turning or after roughing would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Ronald D. Black

    Ronald D. Black

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2010
    Messages:
    23
    Location (City & State):
    Michigan
    I purchase the Anchorseal for our club. It was my understanding the the original is no longer available. Only Anchorseal 2 is. That being said, I don't use a lot of it but, I found that I needed to use two coats (second after first is dry). Since it is water soluble I did not concern myself with the drips as the rain removed them. No expert just my 2 cents worth.
    Ron
     
  3. Richard Jones

    Richard Jones

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2006
    Messages:
    87
    Location (City & State):
    VA
    John,

    Haven't used the newer version. I always call UCC and order direct, nice folks. Just tell them you want the original formula. The last time I ordered a 5 gal. bucket the lady said, oh yeah, you must be a woodturner.......

    Again, can't speak to the Formula II, but from what I read, I'll stay away in droves..........

    Rich

    As an aside, I would think that it would matter more how/where you stored your roughouts, location, humidity, etc. I wax mine as soon as they come off the lathe, then they sit on the floor for a few days, then I store them up between the floor/ceiling joists. I have not seen any difference in bagging vs not bagging. All in my basement, not the driest spot on earth.............. Someone in Arizona would most likely have to do something different.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2012
    Tom C. Jones likes this.
  4. john lucas

    john lucas AAW Forum Expert

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2004
    Messages:
    7,317
    Location (City & State):
    Cookeville TN USA
    Richard That's part of why I'm asking more questions. You get a lot of hear/say on the web and don't know what's factual. I've been reading what I can find but I want more evidence if you know what I mean.
     
  5. Steve Harder

    Steve Harder

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2009
    Messages:
    35
    I've been reading the V1 vs V2 postings since V2 came out.

    Folks' happiness with V2 seems somewhat based on geographical location.

    I've seen a number of postings from the midwest where the preference is for V1.

    And since UCC will sell you either, it seems everyone gets to have their choice.

    As I posted in the other forum, UCC immediately offered to replace V2 with V1 when I contacted them for comments, not with a complaint.

    They do seem to connect V1 with woodturners.
     
  6. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    11,250
    Location (City & State):
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    John, there is a thread on SMC about this subject. Most of the posts seemed to be idle speculation and conspiracy theories so I decided to go to the source and check out the MSDS for both. What I found is in the last post in the thread and basically, there is very little difference. The newer Anchorseal is paraffin wax in a water emulsion and the older Anchorseal appears to be a mixture of more than one petroleum based wax in a water emulsion. I presume that this means that the original formula may be a bit softer and not as likely to flake off, but the newer version provides a better moisture barrier.

    By the way, for the alarmists, the original formula is still available. All that it takes is going to the UC Coatings web site to verify that.
     
  7. Bill Blasic

    Bill Blasic

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2006
    Messages:
    467
    Location (City & State):
    Erie, PA
    Seeing that my club has purchased 110 gallons of each (total) over the last 5 years, I have seen no difference between the two myself. They both have the same record of use for my wood. We have always got the variety that has freeze protection. One person in my club thought that the wood cracked more with II than with I but I have not found that to be the case.
    Bill
     
  8. Jay Simmons

    Jay Simmons

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2018
    Messages:
    4
    Location (City & State):
    Dalton, GA
    As a long time user of various wax emulsions in the rug industry, the manufacturers of these emulsions have needed to reformulate due to unavailability and shortages of certain petroleum based waxes. Some major producers have discontinued offering any waxes. Of course out of this the emulsions have become more expensive. For a rug backing compound some of the newer formulations have not worked as well as my suppliers have tried to minimize cost/price increases to us. I have tried several of the emulsions that I use in rug compounds and all work as well or better than either Anchorseal or the various private labeled brands.
     
  9. Greg Norman

    Greg Norman

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2020
    Messages:
    69
    Location (City & State):
    Germantown, NC
    I’ve used the Klingspore brand for over 20 years and have had great results with it. I started using it mainly because they have a store in town and I don’t have to pay shipping, which greatly reduces the total cost. It’s currently $17/ gallon. I have never used anchorseal so I don’t know how it compares.
     
    John Hicks likes this.
  10. Walter Mooney

    Walter Mooney

    Joined:
    May 26, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Location (City & State):
    Houston, TX
    John,
    A few months back our club had an IRD with Mr. Mike Mahoney. At one point during the demo (probably after seeing the shots of his shop and seeing hundreds of rough-turned bowl blanks stacked all over the place!), the subject of sealing roughed-out bowls came up. Mike said he uses good old white pva glue - Elmer's glue - diluted 20% with water. IIRC, he said he thinks the glue penetrates the wood somewhat and strengthens/stiffens the surface fibers. I currently have a bowl I'm trying it our on, but in Houston I find I have to wait 9 - 12 months to have them be dry enough to finish turn. So I won't be able to tell you how the glue sealer works for quite some time. Mike of course lives in northern CA and doesn't have nearly the humidity we have!
     
  11. GRJensen

    GRJensen

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2011
    Messages:
    170
    Location (City & State):
    Bay Settlement, WI
    I use PVA drywall primer ... about $10 a gallon at most home centers. I apply 2 coats, and have had consistently good results.
     
  12. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2015
    Messages:
    2,180
    Location (City & State):
    Maui, Hawaii
    Home Page:
    By now, 8 years after @john lucas asked this question, he should have an update. Last year we bought a 55 gallons drum of Anchorseal, I only use it on very nice pieces that I want to make sure they do not crack. Living only a few miles from the rain forest, I do not have any problems drying my rough turned bowls.
     
  13. Damon McLaughlin

    Damon McLaughlin

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2017
    Messages:
    276
    Location (City & State):
    Eastern Washington
    Our club recently purchased a drum of the original Anchorseal, our distribution was last weekend. The person in our club that does this order every other year says that while there is little difference between the two in regards to results there was a significant price difference. For the original formula the members paid $12.50 a gallon. One thing that was noted over and over at our distribution is that the original Anchorseal is not freeze proof in its liquid form, so we cannot store it outside or in unheated shops during the winter in our area.

    I've used both and really can't say one works better for me than the other, at lease here in eastern Washington.
     
    Richard Peters likes this.
  14. John Hicks

    John Hicks

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2020
    Messages:
    200
    Location (City & State):
    Hoodsport, Washington
    I believe it is made by the same folks that make anchorseal, and by the way, it works great! Military get 10% off also from Klingspore
     
    Greg Norman likes this.

Share This Page