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2 questions

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by Brian Grenia, Aug 30, 2011.

  1. Brian Grenia

    Brian Grenia

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2011
    Messages:
    29
    Location (City & State):
    Lake St Louis, MO
    1) what is a fair hourly rate to pay for local lessons. I would want someone to come to my shop and train me on my tools. I don't want to waste a lot more time on trial and error and I would like to get some advice on tools, sharpening, cuts, finish, etc...Obviously I don't need Ellsworth to come to my house, but I would want to pay someone, with some experience a fair wage to help me with the craft.

    2) I need a bandsaw that will turn out large, wet bowl blanks. 14-16 inch. Any suggestions on brands, hp, etc...
     
  2. john lucas

    john lucas AAW Forum Expert

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2004
    Messages:
    7,498
    Location (City & State):
    Cookeville TN USA
    I can't say what rates would be. I've always taught for free for local people unless I'm doing a workshop. I would look for a club in your area and ask if someone is willing to help you out. It would probably be inexpensive. If that doesn't work try taking a weekend workshop somewhere. If you'll tell us where you are we may be able to help you find a club, a class, possibly an instructor.
     
  3. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

    Joined:
    May 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,540
    I think a lot of people would be turned off by offers of a "wage" to talk about and practice something they love. Hit the local clubs or suppliers for some assistance, and get together with one, then another turner. That will give you some insight into what's fundamental and what's personal. Find out what their preferred beverage is, then have it or a "spare" chunk of wood or two around when they drop by.

    The capacity between the guides is what you're interested in for your bandsaw. For 14-16" diameter one supposes that a bandsaw like my Delta with its one horse would handle the average depth likely after slabbing the heart and a place for the chuck. He does 6 1/4 clean, up to about eight with a whittle. Eight inch capacity would be a substantial bandsaw if you have the room. MiniMax, Rikon, as well as other makers come to mind. The iron types like mine often have extenders to get to 12" capacity between the guides. It's the blade and the feed more than the HP with wet wood. One to one and a half is good.
     
  4. n7bsn

    n7bsn

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2005
    Messages:
    886
    Location (City & State):
    wetter washington
    Home Page:
    As for bandsaws, I have the Grizzly G0457, a 2 HP 14" bandsaw. The only downside is it doesn't use the "standard" 14 inch blade. The G0555X has been very popular (and uses the standard blades), but it is "only" 1-1/2 HP
     
  5. Patrick Miller

    Patrick Miller

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    Messages:
    114
    Location (City & State):
    Central Washington State, the dry side.
    My mentor charges $75.00 / hour unless you are a member of the local AAW chapter- then it's for free and for fun- three of the best hours I spend each week!
     
  6. Bart Leetch

    Bart Leetch

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Messages:
    207
    So why not get one of Bill Grumbine's DVD's Amazon has them or Google his name to fine his web site. I have his DVD Turned bowls made easy & have learned quite a bit about proper tool presentation.
     
  7. Dick Sowa

    Dick Sowa

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2007
    Messages:
    112
    Location (City & State):
    Dundee, MI
    Home Page:
    I agree with Bart...buy some DVDs and then spend some hours trying the techniques. It is money well spent. Then, join a local AAW chapter, and you will find lots of folks willing to "teach" whatever technique you are interested in for free. I have had several folks from my club out to my shop to show them how I do it, and what tools I use.

    As far as bandsaws go, I have a Grizzly G0555 with a riser block. The riser block option is common with a lot of brands, and is a good investment. I have found the HP on bandsaws is seldom a real issue, unless I want to re-saw boards that are a foot thick...then I need to just introduce the wood slower. My saw has yet to lug down, and cuts like butter...as long as I have a sharp blade.
     
  8. David Wilkins

    David Wilkins

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2008
    Messages:
    181
    My starting rate for a class is $25 an hour. Students can bring wood if they like or buy from me. Plenty of times I have students or other turners over just for fun. I had one student call me at 9:45 pm on a Friday because he had messed up the grind on his bowl gouge and it was the time his wife gave him to turn. I also took any new members of the local club in if they needs help sharpening, it's rough to endure the same meeting year in and out. I know a number of my students have given out a similar courtesy. DVDs are another good source, but there is nothing like hands on.
     
  9. TJ Hamilton

    TJ Hamilton

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2007
    Messages:
    61
    Location (City & State):
    Douglasville, GA
    Brian, when I starting turning the Houston AAW club teachers were charging $125/day. Lessons in my shop, I bought lunch and had a fabulous day. Did it twice and then the DVDs, magazines and conversations at club meetings made sense. Highly recommend lessons regardless of the price.

    Bandsaws: I've got a Grizzly 513 series. 2HP, 12 inches under the guides. Cuts all I can lift.

    Best regards, Tom
     
  10. KellyDunn

    KellyDunn

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2010
    Messages:
    361
    Location (City & State):
    Hawi, Hawaii
    Home Page:
    Brian, there are ten AAW chapters in MO. You say Lake St Louis so there are two chapters in the St Louis area. Show Me Woodturners. contact Mike Short go to showmewoodturners.com next is Woodturners of St Louis Chris Weiler go to stlturners.org If they are not near you you can lookup the chapters in the state. We have a mentor program where a person makes an appointment. Brings their tools and what they want to know. I give anywhere from an hour to half a day depending on the person. I get $500 a day to demo so free in our club works well. Many clubs are glad to help folks out. Getting someone to come to your place though? not sure.
    As far as bandsaws I got an 18inch Lobo(taiwan). It takes 155 inch blades so I make my own. A 12 inch saw with a riser block would most likely serve you well.
     
  11. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2004
    Messages:
    2,638
    Location (City & State):
    Plano, Texas
    Home Page:
    As for the mentors, the local clubs probably have a program, join and enjoy at a low cost.

    Bandsaws, the diameter only has to do with table size, thickness, a different story. You can get through 6" on almost any saw with the right blade and patience, 12" is a bigger limit. Yep, there are several that have a 12" throat (resaw), but the speed is a different story, and that's where HP comes in. A good saw in the "lower end" space is the the Laguna 16HD. 3HP (I hear the groans from here) is a great start, above 12" thick, and above $2K-$3K opens up a whole new avenue.
    Personally, I have been through the 12" phase, and then the Laguna 16HD and have settled in on the Laguna 24" with 24" resaw. Most turners don't need it, or do I, but if I do, it is there. 5Hp butter cuts through even thick teak when I need it. But as I stated, not needed for most.
     
  12. Harry Robinette

    Harry Robinette

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    148
    Location (City & State):
    Stow,Ohio
    I get $100.00 a day 8am to about 5pm I supply everything( bring your tools preferred )including lunch.But joining a Club is the BEST thing to do if possible.
    As for bandsaw I use a 2 1/2hp 18" Rikon use to use a 14" Jet 1hp just wasn't enough power.I use a 3/8" 3 or 4 tpi hook or skip tooth blade mainly PS Wood
    Timber Wolf.
     
  13. Doug Stevens

    Doug Stevens

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Messages:
    26
    Location (City & State):
    Lake Saint Louis, MO
    Brian,

    I live less than five miles from you. Call me and we can work something out. I've been turning for 13 years and am always willing to share knowledge with those who ask. 636 614 5598.
     
  14. DOCworks

    DOCworks

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2006
    Messages:
    231
    Location (City & State):
    Apopka, FL
    Home Page:
    Brian,
    I get $100/day with lunch after finding out what the turner wants and or needs. I think that's about average. Club members I don't charge anything, but I don't supply lunch..they do. ;-) Bandsaw I have a MiniMax 16" (new one). But I think any of the better brands will do (MM, Laguna, Rikon, Delta, etc.) what you want unless you are going into production then you need a 24" and a lot of money. If you can look at a few, you want to make sure the tensioning system is up to what blades you are putting on the machine. 16" bandsaws are the smallest you should put a carbide blade on, some will disagree, but that will only be for slicing vaneer. I use a 1/2" 2-3 tpi blade for my saw, the cost about $18/ea + shipping. Cuts green oak like butter.
     
  15. Jake Gevorgian

    Jake Gevorgian

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2011
    Messages:
    81
    Location (City & State):
    Los Angeles, California
    Home Page:
    I've not paid a penny for learning woodturning. Therefore, when I give out my knowledge I shouldn't charge a penny either.

    And if I were to teach woodturning, the student could purchase my lesson with bartering some highly exotic lumber :)

    As for the bandsaws, I've tried a 16" Rikon at my friend's shop, but I didn't like it. The saw would stall when I was cutting 10" thick Olivewood blanks.

    I've tried Agazzani bandsaw at Eagle Tools, here in Los Angeles, and since then I've been dreaming about getting it...too pricey.

    Cheers,
    Jake
     
  16. robo hippy

    robo hippy

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,061
    Location (City & State):
    Eugene, OR
    For cutting 16 high, the Laguna 16HD or the comparable Mini Max. They have 4.5 hp, and with a resaw blade (1 1/4 bimetal Lennox Diemaster), they will cut through just about anything all day long. Cost about $3,000 delivered. I have the Laguna and it has paid for itself many times over. I know Woodcraft is carrying that line now. A 1 hp motor will handle 6 inch high all day long. A 2 hp will handle 12 inch all day long.

    Do find the local club. Mentoring is usually part of being in the club, and cheaper than paying some one to come over, though beer and lunch are nice. Right now, I mentor for lunch, but am too far away. A mentor is better than a DVD because you can ask questions. At a club meeting, you might get a couple of different answers, but it gives you a lot to try out so you can find out what works best for you.

    robo hippy
     

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