Milwaukee Drill Parts

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Emiliano Achaval, Aug 9, 2017.

  1. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2015
    Messages:
    322
    Location:
    Maui, Hawaii
    Home Page:
    I took my very old Milwaukee angled drill to a friend of mine that claimed he could change the brushes and the cord for me. So far he hasn't been able to find the brushes... Does anybody knows where I can buy brushes for it. I keep biding on Ebay for used ones but I keep getting outbid. Thanks to Odie for helping me with that... As a side note, this is the forum that feels like home to me. There are other places that I go, but what better place to feel welcomed than the official AAW sponsored forum... Aloha
     
  2. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    7,683
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    It's been about ten years, but I used to buy a lot of industrial motors and controllers on eBay and I never put in a bid until there was just a few seconds left on the bid clock. I think that I sometimes even beat the automated bids. I don't know the cost, but you could have your bids automated for a nominal fee.

    Have you tried the Milwaukee Tool website? Go to Support and then either Parts or Manuals. You might also try calling them. It's possible that they no longer have parts for your drill, but it's worth asking. Getting brushes is easier if they aren't integral with some special holder, but in a lot of small hand tools the brushes are part of an oddball assembly which makes just replacing the brushes a problem.

    I have a Sioux drill and I know that there aren't any parts available for it, but I hope that it just keeps on keeping on.
     
  3. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    7,683
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    BTW, I Googled "Milwaukee drill brushes and got several hits. Here's one at eReplacement Parts.
     
  4. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2015
    Messages:
    322
    Location:
    Maui, Hawaii
    Home Page:
    Sorry, you just reminded me, my old drill is a Sioux... So, I'm looking for brushes for a SIOUX, not a milwaukee...
     
  5. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2015
    Messages:
    322
    Location:
    Maui, Hawaii
    Home Page:
    I will try that for the SIOUX... Thanks!
     
  6. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    7,683
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    I had a hunch that it was a Sioux. :D
     
    Emiliano Achaval likes this.
  7. Doug Rasmussen

    Doug Rasmussen

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2015
    Messages:
    102
    Location:
    Seattle
    Try here first::
    http://store.eurtonelectric.com/brushes.aspx

    Years ago I was able to get brushes for an obsolete tool at my local power tool repair shop. It was a matter of finding brushes close in size to what I needed. Brushes can be carefully sanded down to the needed dimensions. Not always so easy to find a repair shop..willing to let you look through their inventory. though. This could be especially hard on Maui.

    Custom brushes can be made, not cheap and most small tools aren't worth the expense. 20 some years ago I had brushes custom made for a 5hp DC lathe motor, $125 for two sets.

    Cords can be expensive. If you could even find a factory replacement it could be in the over $25 range so it's best to make up your own with a length of cord from Home Depot or Lowes. If there's a rubber strain reliever boot needing replacement that's another problem, finding a generic boot that can adapted.may be possible..
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2017
    Emiliano Achaval likes this.
  8. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2015
    Messages:
    322
    Location:
    Maui, Hawaii
    Home Page:
    Thank you Doug! Good idea, I will bribe a worker at the repair shop, they told me they could not fix it, but they fix other brands, so I’m assuming they have brushes...
     
  9. olaf Vogel

    olaf Vogel

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2015
    Messages:
    185
    Location:
    Toronto, Ont, CA
    Home Page:
    I find it REALLY depends on who you get. Many guys have little initiative. So "if its not on the list..." then they just turn it down.
    Realistically, its a lot more profitable to just plug in a new part that was sitting on a shelf, rather then do real work.

    Frequently, its the small shops, with limited suppliers, that do well with such work
    (you can always take it to Cuba - they can fix any old thing. The ingenuity there makes McGyver look stupid.

    e-Replacement parts is really good. Lots of selection. have used them a lot.
    And you can try OWWM.ORG. Those guys love old domestic, stuff and know all the places to look for parts.
     
  10. John Torchick

    John Torchick

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,016
    Location:
    Southeast Tennessee
    What Bill said in post #2. I couldn't find both blade wrenches for my Ryobi TS. Ryobi only had one size and was out of stock on the other. Went to the website and found both, the stock indicating they had several of each size.
    FWIW, I have heard that Cubans are still driving cars from the 50s when Castro took over. Be a great place to hold a Barrett auction! Cubans can fix any old thing? Maybe I should go to Cuba and see what they could do for me!
     
  11. olaf Vogel

    olaf Vogel

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2015
    Messages:
    185
    Location:
    Toronto, Ont, CA
    Home Page:
    Due to necessity, they can fix anything.
    And no, you dont want to buy a Cuban car. You'll find parts from 20 different manufacturers under there. Our mechanics would have a heart attack.
    I was in an 1960's Pontiac, with a 2000(ish) Peugeot diesel 4 banger, plus god knows what to make it work. And it had A/C!
    Ingenuity!
     
  12. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    7,683
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    I replaced a drill cord with a heavier duty cord and reused the strain relief boot since it was in good shape. However, I had to ream out the boot in order to accommodate the larger cord. I think that I wound up using a couple rat tail files, but everything worked out fine. There are also some standard strain reliefs sans boot if all else fails. Necessity is the mother of invention. Not sure who the daddy is. :D
     
  13. odie

    odie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    4,262
    Location:
    Deep in the woods
    I have both Sioux and Milwaukee angle drills, and they are virtually identical.......would be willing to bet they are both made by the same manufacturer, and parts interchangeable.......

    -----odie-----
     
  14. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2015
    Messages:
    322
    Location:
    Maui, Hawaii
    Home Page:
    I was thinking
    I was thinking the same Odie! I'm searching all these replacement web sites too. But finding a used decent Milwaukke and taking the brushes out might work.. My Soux at the end was screeching and halting a little, and noticed the one on Ebay the owner said thats the problem. I wonder if thats a gear problem as opposed to brushes? Old habits die hard, went thru 2 Sioux drills, and I got so used too them. Now I have a buch of drills on my bench, included the Metabo orbital sander, a milwaukee angled drill, a Dewalt regular drill corded, a palm orbital sander for big platters and of course a whole lot of sand paper...
     
  15. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    664
    Location:
    Newberg, OR: 20mi SW of Portland: AAW #21058
    Screeching and halting sounds like a bearing that’s seized or gunked up. As I recall, the bearings are common off the shelf pieces and being pretty small aren’t expensive. Keep in mind that these tools were designed to drill holes, not put up with a lot of sanding dust and grit. That means the cleaning maintenance needs to be a lot more frequent than a tool used for drilling.

    As long as we’re on the subject, I got tired of using the keyed chuck so swapped in a keyless. Not sure yet if that was wise...

    AND, if anyone out there has a non-working or screeching Sioux/Milwaukee, I’ll take it off their hands.
     
  16. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    7,683
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    Mine doesn't screech ... it just hums while it works. :D
     
  17. Leo Van Der Loo

    Leo Van Der Loo

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2016
    Messages:
    170
    Location:
    Rainy River District Ontario Canada
    The biggest problem IMO is that they use just shielded bearings, and that is fine for the intended drilling use, but with the sanding use, wood dust will get into the bearing and seize up the bearing, than the bearing will rotate in the plastic housing and the seat will get ruined, the drill is done.

    I had this happen with my Milwaukee as my son had used it for some sanding, he told me the drill was starting to make some noise, I opened it up and found the rear bearing had seized up and destroyed the seat.

    Long story short I used epoxy to fill around the bearing and closed it up, next day opened and cleaned/cut the excess away and then removed the seized bearing and installed a new bearing, worked again and I still use it now when needed.

    If I have to buy a new one again, I will exchange the rear shielded bearing with a sealed bearing before starting to use it.

    As for parts, you can get parts for it I believe from Milwaukee, here’s the parts for the close quarter drill, the drill housing looks a little different,but the inside looks the same as mine.

    https://documents.milwaukeetool.com/54-06-0374.pdf
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2017
  18. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2016
    Messages:
    505
    Locate the parts break down for that model of tool and determine the part number for the brushes.
    This part number will allow you to search the "Ebay" and "Amazon" type outlets more efficiently.
    The part number or model of the tool can also help you find an after market set of brushes for
    such a tool. A supplier like Grainger can also look up a cross reference for many of these parts
    if they are commonly available. There are several manufacturers that make after market brush assemblies
    and contacts for electrical equipment and tools. You can always find a set of brushes that are close in design
    and sand/file them into the profile you need.
     
  19. John Stegall

    John Stegall

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2009
    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    Kerrville
    This post may be too old but one of club members who can make almost anything said Sioux made the Milwaukee drills you are talking about. He was one of the original starters of AAW.(James Johnson). So if you find a Milwaukee part, it should fit your Sioux.
     
  20. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    7,683
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    Yes indeed, James is a very innovative engineer. I remember when he used to bring his giant lathe to SWAT every year.

    I plan to see what kind of giant bowl corings I might be able to take off his hands this weekend.
     

Share This Page