Chainsaws & Size (probably again)

Discussion in 'Main Forum' started by Tom Albrecht, Jul 16, 2017.

  1. Tom Albrecht

    Tom Albrecht

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    This is a question for those of you who have large, professional saws, and use them on large diameter logs for bowl blanks.

    I am currently using a Stihl with a 25" bar. It is a 59cc engine running at less than 5 hp. I need a bigger and more powerful machine.

    What saw and bar length do you recommend?
     
  2. Glenn Lefley

    Glenn Lefley

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    Im from logging country a stihl 59 cc with a 25 in bar is extremly maxed out. 20 inch is good for that saw 24 is for one ofs, cutting slow. Go to a stihl ms-661 7.2 bhp and then you can throw a 28 -36 in bar on .
     
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  3. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    I have several saws... My favorite is the Husqvarna 372 XP 83 CC, 32 in bar. Its a beast, a super saw. Have to wear double hearing protection... And even that sometimes can't get the whole log....
     
  4. Tom Albrecht

    Tom Albrecht

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    You're right Glen, though I didn't know why. My 362 with that 25" bar does cut real slow but I never thought about the possibility of being "maxed out". Now I wonder why they would offer that option?
     
  5. DON FRANK

    DON FRANK

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    Tom, Another option is to port the exhaust on your Stihl. I did that on mine when I went from an 18" to 25" bar. It is easily done and there are multiple videos on youtube about doing it. It is simply allowing more exits for the exhaust. It gave the saw a noticeable power difference.
     
  6. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    If your going to modify the ports you might as well polish them and install a Teflon coated piston
    and use racing fuel in the motor. :)
     
  7. Tom Albrecht

    Tom Albrecht

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    Thanks, this helps a lot!
     
  8. DON FRANK

    DON FRANK

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    I think I used the wrong terminology. There is a sheet metal shield over the exhaust that is used for noise suppression. By drilling holes in this shield it does make the saw louder but it also allows the exhaust to leave the engine faster and does increase the h.p. You do have to adjust the carb and the videos explain this. I watched a lot of videos and read everything I could find before I tried it myself. This modification seems to be widely known in the logging industry. I have run the saw for a year or more since these modifications and I'm happy with the results. I am not a motor mechanic so I suggest anyone considering this to do their own research.
    There is a considerable leap in price and weight of a saw that is intended to use more than an 18" bar. The saws go from a "farm" saw to a logging or commercial saw and the prices increase considerably. I have used several logging saws and the overall weight of the saw becomes a consideration. My saw handles the larger bar with roughly the same power as it handled the 18" bar before the modifications.
     
  9. Richard Coers

    Richard Coers

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    When anyone says their saw cuts slow, I ask about the chain. What tooth and raker combination are you using. Some of the new chains are called safety chain, and hardly take much of a curl at all. Ditch the safety chain, and go to a full chisel tooth. If you sharpen yourself, have you filled down the rakers? I've broken down a LOT of big urban trees. I have a Sthil 029 with a 20" bar and a Husqvarna 3120 with a 36" bar. The Husqvarna is a machine, 119 cubic centimeters, 8.3hp. You can set the bucking teeth and pull the handle with both hands!
     
  10. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

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    Good thoughts on the chain configuration; that can make a tremendous difference.

    You:[​IMG] Me:[​IMG]
    I am in awe of you guys with your huge saws. I have two saws — my primary saw is a Makita 54cc with 18” bar, my second is an old Stihl 041AV (61cc) with 24”?/26”? bar. Working the Stihl gives me rubber-arms in fairly short order but I keep it because I love its unique exhaust tone. Rather than sounding like a mosquito, it kinda goes pocky-pocky-pocky.
     
  11. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    Perhaps I'm overly cautious, but I'm not 18 anymore and one thought that went into which saw to purchase was how much saw can I safely handle. There are those times when huge logs and crotches come along and need to be processed and I can't part them out with my power and bar capacity, but the great majority of the time I can process blanks to the capacity of my lathe.

    In my experience, if my saw isn't cutting well, it's the chain and not a lack of power. (The darn saw just LOVES eating hidden nails and occasionally snacking on gravel :()
     
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  12. Glenn Lefley

    Glenn Lefley

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    Everyone is so right on a sharp chain. Its just like a dull lathe chisel! Needs tlc all the time. So much easier on the motor.
     
  13. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Many years ago we had a super demo by a husqvarna rep.
    He covered safer, saw maintenance, tuning the carberator, sharpening.

    When he got to the bucking prongs he related a story of a logger who said
    " bucking prongs? We call that the DCO - Dull Chain Over Ride"
     
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  14. Richard Coers

    Richard Coers

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    Dull chain override? He never did a full day of bucking logs if that is his opinion. Well that and he may have not cut anything over 12" diameter. It's a work smarter not harder technique. Drop a saw into a 24" white oak log and ignoring the bucking teeth is just plain crazy. It's simple physics and good technique to shorten the fulcrum and get better leverage with the bucking teeth. I've seen people using chainsaws like a one man buck saw. They are constantly rotating the saw and even pulling it back and forth, in and out. Why put all the effort into the saw? Those high performance speed cutters don't use the bucking teeth, but they are only cutting for a couple minutes at a time.
     
  15. Paul M. Kaplowitz

    Paul M. Kaplowitz

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    I have two Sthil saws that rip through anything. The smaller one is an MS 391 with a 20" bar, and the other is an MS 440 Magnum with a 25" bar. I use the Magnum to rip through logs of any diameter up to 40",( Coming in from both ends) and the 391 to round the blanks. Once in a while I get larger logs and I borrow a friends 660. I use the agressive chains that have a yellow square on the box. The green ones don't cut fast enough for me. I buy 5 chains at a time from my local dealer and he gives me the sixth one free. I have a Timberline sharpening jig I like. pmk
     
  16. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    Gas can contribute to the saw not running and cutting well... Husquavarna now sells mix in a can. 95 octane clear with the mix already in it. I tried out a case of it. Normally, I would just use premium gas straight from the pump. My saw and weed whacker both ran a lot better on the higher octane clear gas. It is pretty spendy, and great if you seldom run your saw. I went to a local station that carries clear gas and tried some 92 octane clear. They still run well. They also have 97 octane which I haven't tried yet, but it runs about $7 per gallon, but may try it as well, just out of curiosity....

    I do have 2 saws. One Husky with a 24 inch bar, and a Sthil with a 36 inch bar. Most of the time I use the Husky. I don't often need the 36 inch bar any more..

    robo hippy
     
  17. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    DCO came from loggers with the six foot bars when the speaker was doing an osha class.
    The speaker was relating DCO to us as a joke.

    Sharp chains always work best. Like any cutting tool they begin to go from sharp to dull as we use them.
    I've never had a chain that could stay sharp much past 2 tanks of gas with my Stihl 44 mag with a 24" bar. Dirt and foreign objects can dull one in an instant
     
  18. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    A bit of trivia about gasoline:
    • The energy in a gallon of 80 octane gasoline is 114,000 BTU.
    • The energy in a gallon of 90 octane gasoline is 114,000 BTU.
    • The energy in a gallon of 100 octane gasoline is 114,000 BTU.
    Q: So what is the difference between the various octane ratings if they all deliver the same amount of energy?
    A: The difference is the rate at which gasoline burns. The higher the octane rating, the slower it burns. With low octane gas, the spark can cause the gas in the cylinder to burn explosively especially if it is over lean ... a condition known as detonation. Detonation is hard on the engine and causes the engine to run hotter. With high octane gas, the spark causes the gas to burn slower, creating a high pressure wave front that pushes the piston down rather than hammering it down. The engine runs cooler and more of the gasoline's thermal energy gets converted into mechanical motion. So, the difference is whether energy is wasted in heating the engine or converted into useful mechanical motion. We ought not get carried away with thinking that higher octane rating is always better. There is an optimal octane rating based on the engine design and using gasoline with a higher octane rating than the optimal value doesn't provide any performance gain.

    My two chainsaws don't warrant mentioning, but I'll do it anyway. I have a 30 year old gasoline Stihl 025C and a Sthil MSE170C electric saw both with 16" bars which is plenty long enough for most of the the trees that grow in the rather dry central Texas area.
     
  19. Leo Van Der Loo

    Leo Van Der Loo

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    High compression engines need high octane, as you will get combustion before top dead center of the piston, so it will push the piston down back and this can/will cause engine damage, like broken crankshafts
    High octane prevents the pre-combustion of the gasoline.
    Timed fuel injection does away with this problem, as is the reason why Diesel engines have to have fuel injection.
     
  20. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Interesting. I have never had a problem with gas in anything I owned.
    I had a friend who was a chemical engineer and worked at a local refinery in Louisiana. He revealed a lot to me about the refinery. They ran many different brands of oil- even well-known brands. They would even make a brand for you- just change the label. What was more interesting, if my memory serves me, is that when the octane rating was lower than needed, they just added naphtha.
    I had a 65 Corvette. Does anyone remember the Shell blended gas? You dialed the proper setting and filled up. I used the highest rated gas and my V-8 ran like a scalded cat! Yes, wish I still had it!
     

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