CBN for Tormek

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Bill Boehme, Sep 14, 2017.

  1. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Raul I don't know how long the CBN wheel's last. Mine is over 3 years old and still working perfectly.
     
  2. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    So you were using a Tormek stone on the Griz? ... And, then replaced it with the CBN wheel? Do you like the 1200 grit?

    At first I was a bit disappointed with the 1000 grit CBN wheel being too coarse, but it seems to be "wearing in" after initially shedding a lot of excess CBN crystals.
     
  3. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Update on using the CBN wheel on the Tormek:

    • Since the old shaft on the Tormek had a small amount of corrosion pitting and was worn slightly from rubbing the plastic bushings (the plastic bushings were well worn), I ordered a new shaft kit that included new bushings, drive pin, drive wheel washer, precision machined washer for the grindstone, and EZ Lock nut for changing grindstones without tools.
    • Since my Tormek is approaching its twentieth birthday, I went for a total makeover and got a new drive wheel and a new leather honing wheel.
    • The new drive wheel is metal instead of plastic ... not that there was anything wrong with the old plastic wheel except that the rubber was starting to harden a bit and develop a slight glaze on the surface.
    • The old leather honing wheel had a nice glossy black patina, but also had a pronounced dip worn in the middle.
    • The first thing that I discovered when installing the CBN wheel was that it rubbed against the housing. The reason is that the hub of the CBN wheel is recessed 3/16 inch on both sides whereas the Tormek grindstone is recessed only on the outboard side. So I had to hunt for a sufficiently thick flat washer that was uniform in thickness. I'm still experimenting with different washers, but I think that I will go with a ⅛" thick.nylon washer.
    • Initially, I used the wheel dry, but didn't like a the dust scattered everywhere. I also didn't like the rough bevel that the CBN wheel produced.
    • I have been using the CBN wheel wet and like that much more than dry.
    • I tried the blackstone wheel to see how well it would work sharpening a bowl gouge. The finish is nearly as good as the standard gray stone. The blackstone is also supposed to be good for touching up carbide cutters.
    • It has been a month since my back surgery, but I still haven't been cleared to do any turning. All my tools are sharp and just sitting there. sigh
     
  4. Jon Murphy

    Jon Murphy

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    Bill, I saw this one before signing off. It is late, my lady needs a ride at noon, so I'll open just one more beer.

    I had a Tormek wet 10" a for a while, I gave it to my AAW chapter when I got a CBN wheel for my 8" dry grinder. The available jigs for the dry grinder are better, in my opinion, than the Tormek jigs. The slow speed of the Tormek does allow for small adjustments in the grind, but I found that the time to get an edge, even if just duplicating it, was excessive on the "slow/wet". As my shop is in my bedroom I don't have room for a lot of tools - my choice was to give the "slow/wet" away and go with a variable speed 8" grinder. I have no regrets. My CBN wheels are D-Way, with the "fine" (180, I think) wheel having the rounded edges for making my cutters, and my coarse wheel having a small grinding edge on the sides.

    When my "slow grinder" died I bought a standard Delta VS to replace it, a lot cheaper than the 1750 "slows". It has a low rpm of 2200, and a high of 3400. At 2200 the CBN wheel gives me a clean edge comparable to the Tormek slow/wet and the 1750 slow with a fine grit high grade AO wheel.

    Tonight I was working on reshaping some tools, I reground them to shape with the Delta VS grinder at the top (@ 3400) and had no problem with overheating of the M2 steel. I dropped the speed to refine then, then, using the same jig, moved over to the fine wheel to refine them.

    Unless one wants a concave bevel from a 10" wheel, which you will only get when the wheel is new, I see no advantage to the Tormek "slow/wet". I loved it when it was my only alternative in shaping my tools as I wanted them, but times change and so do the devices.

    Contact me directly via email, if you would like - I'd prefer to offer the details directly. The email address, with the symbol substituted by the word in quotes, is jon"at"murphsays.com.
     
  5. James Seyfried

    James Seyfried

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    Bill, did you get the aluminum wheel or the new Spartan nylon one?
     
  6. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    The wheel that I have is the aluminum Tornado (4 in 1 style). I don't like the Spartan design because it doesn't have grit on the side. Also the narrow hub on the Spartan wouldn't work well with the EZLock nut.

    The aluminum wheel is surprisingly heavy ... very close to the same weight as the AlO wheel ... maybe even heavier.
     
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  7. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    Bill, what do you use the side grind feature for? I prefer the straight wheels without the radius edge. I don't think I have any particular use for a flat bevel, but then have never used one either...

    robo hippy
     
  8. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I use the side grind with slightly rounded edges to grind my hollowing tool cutters. They are 3/16 square HSS. Learned that technique from Lyle Jamieson. You sort of pull the left side of the tool across the right hand radius of the stone. then do the same to the right side of the tool pulling it up and over the left hand side of the stone and the round over the nose. Gives you an edge that looks a lot like a bowl gouge but without the flute of course.
     
  9. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I use it for several things:
    • flattening hand chisels
    • flattening hand planes
    • gently flattening the top of scrapers to knock off the raised burr.
    I should mention that this is on a 1000 grit stone or CBN wheel running at only 90 RPM so it is more like hand honing and not comparable to what you would do with a grinder with a 180 grit wheel running at 1750 RPM. Since I'm working on a large surface area it's more like polishing the surface flat and not grinding away much metal.
     
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  10. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    Hmm, I do know the radius edge was a David Ellsworth idea, and the hollowing bits are apparently easier to sharpen with the rounded edge. Never considered using the side to hone off the scraper burrs, always did that by hand. Same with chisels and plane irons. The slow speed of the Tormek would make this a good use if the side grind was a couple of inches long/wide.

    robo hippy
     
  11. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I should clarify what the wheel looks like. It is 2" wide with square corners on the edges and then It's 1" wide on the sides ... no rounded corners. The way that a tool is presented at an angle on the side of the wheel, you have the equivalent of a wider grinding surface ... and by moving the tool quickly side to side you can actually flatten an even wider surface.
     

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